Notes Demostrator Protests Rave Reviews for Course

By Associated PressJuly 23, 2006, 4:00 pm
135th Open Championship HOYLAKE, England -- Tiger Woods can't seem to win a British Open without some type of disruption. There was a streaker at St. Andrews, and purple flour bomb Sunday at Royal Liverpool as he was about to play his third shot from behind the 18th green.
 
A man was heard to shout, 'Fathers For Justice' as six flour bombs were thrown onto the putting surface, drawing boos from the fans sitting around the 18th green. The man was led away by police, who wore plastic gloves to clean away the residue.
 
The flour bombs left small purple stains on the grass but didn't seem to affect the players.
 
'We only saw the paint,' said Sergio Garcia, who was Woods' playing partner. 'We didn't see when they threw it. It's very disappointing to see that happen in a championship like this one is, the best championship in the world. It didn't affect me at all. I wasn't putting through the paint anyway.'
 
Fathers 4 Justice is a campaign for father's rights in child custody cases. Similar devices were thrown at Prime Minister Tony Blair in the House of Commons two years ago during a debate.
 
BIG DAY:
Marius Thorp won't forget Sunday at Royal Liverpool anytime soon.
 
The European Amateur champion got to play the final round with five-time British Open champion Tom Watson. He ended it with a birdie on the final hole for a 1-under 71 to win the silver medal that goes to the low amateur.
 
Thorp finished at even-par 288. His only competition came from U.S. Amateur champion Edoardo Molinari of Italy, who finished at 295.
 
'I played with one of the biggest legends in the game and that was simply fantastic,' Thorp said. 'I learned so much today.'
 
Watson learned a bit, too, such as what it was like to be 18 again.
 
'He's fearless with the putter. I remember those days,' Watson said. 'I reveled in it and I wish I could be like that these days.'
 
Thorp said his parents introduced him to golf, despite the lack of courses in Norway. He said he was inspired by watching Tiger Woods on television.
 
On Sunday, Thorp played in the same final round as Woods, then got his last thrill of the day when he stood next to him at the medal ceremony to receive his award.
 
RISING SUN:
Hideto Tanihara started the final round hopeful of becoming the first Japanese player to win a major.
 
He ended it by missing an 8-foot birdie putt that cost him an automatic ticket to the Masters, spoiling an otherwise good week.
 
Tanihara, playing in his second British Open, closed with a 1-under 71 and tied for fifth with Sergio Garcia at 11-under 277, seven shots behind Tiger Woods. The top four and ties from the British Open are exempt to the Masters.
 
'It's kind of bittersweet,' he said. 'I felt I left a few shots out there today, but on the other hand it is a great finish.'
 
The one consolation? He won't have to qualify for the British Open next year because the top 10 automatically return.
 
'This is by far my best achievement,' Tanihara said. 'I never expected to be in the top 10, but I did expect to play well this week.'
 
Tanihara has played on the Japanese Tour for the last five years, where he has won three times, including once this year. In his last Open appearance in 2003, he missed the cut.
 
RAVE REVIEWS:
Royal Liverpool hadn't been in the British Open rotation for 39 years. Based on how the players felt about it, the venerable club won't have to wait that long again.
 
'Hopefully the R&A will now put this course back on the rotation sooner rather than later,' former U.S. Open champion Michael Campbell said.
 
Tiger Woods called it a 'fantastic test' that allowed for more creativity than usual for a British Open. It was a brown links course, courtesy of a hot, dry spell in England that turned the rough into wispy strands of grass.
 
Asked if the Open should return to Royal Liverpool, the champion replied, 'Yes.'
 
The last Open at Royal Liverpool was in 1967, but the course was dropped from the rotation because of logistical problems getting people to and from the course squeezed into a Liverpool suburb.
 
Those problems were largely overcome at this Open, with some 38,000 people a day attending, and players generally liked what they saw.
 
'It's a very good golf course and it's right there in front of you,' Thomas Bjorn said. 'It's a good test and while it's not the longest the way it played, somehow it has still put up a good test.'
 
Former champion David Duval also liked what he saw.
 
'It was as much about the links experience as any I've played, even St. Andrews,' Duval said.
 
WEARING TWO HATS:
Steve Lucas kept regular hours in the insurance business until he took on a part-time job as caddie for his son-in-law, Sean O'Hair. Lucas was a steadying influence for O'Hair, whose father used boot-camp tactics to train his son to play golf.
 
After a year on tour and a victory last year in the John Deere Classic, O'Hair decided to switch to a professional caddie.
 
Lucas was behind the ropes Sunday, chomping on a cigar, shouting encouragement to his son-in-law. Standing behind the 17th green, he sounded like a caddie again.
 
'Front middle. Let it funnel to the hole,' Lucas said.
 
The ball soared toward the flag, narrowly missed the bunker and stopped 4 feet away for a birdie. Lucas raised both hands over his head and clapped, turning from caddie to father-in-law again.
 
O'Hair birdied the 18th for a 67, matching Tiger Woods for best score of the final round, and he tied for 14th.
 
PLAYING FOR PAY:
Edoardo Molinari stayed an amateur long enough to play in the Masters, U.S. Open and British Open.
 
But after closing with a 75, the Italian is ready to turn pro.
 
Molinari, who earned his exemptions by winning the U.S. Amateur last year, will make his pro debut this week at the Deutsche Bank Players Championship in Germany through a sponsor's invitation.
 
He signed with a Swiss sports agency.
 
'The last year has been an incredible journey with many fantastic experiences,' Molinari said.
 
Related Links:
  • Leaderboard - 135th Open Championship
  • Course Tour - Royal Liverpool
  • Full Coverage - 135th Open Championship
     
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    Woods favored to miss Farmers Insurance Open cut

    By Will GrayJanuary 24, 2018, 1:54 am

    If the Las Vegas bookmakers are to be believed, folks in the San Diego area hoping to see Tiger Woods this week might want to head to Torrey Pines early.

    Woods is making his first competitive start of the year this week at the Farmers Insurance Open, and it will be his first official start on the PGA Tour since last year's event. He missed nearly all of 2017 because of a back injury before returning with a T-9 finish last month at the Hero World Challenge.

    But the South Course at Torrey Pines is a far different test than Albany, and the Westgate Las Vegas SuperBook lists Woods as a -180 favorite to miss the 36-hole cut. It means bettors must wager $180 to win $100, while his +150 odds to make the cut mean a bettor can win $150 with a $100 wager.

    Woods is listed at 25/1 to win. He won the tournament for the seventh time in 2013, but in three appearances since he has missed the 36-hole cut, missed the 54-hole cut and withdrawn after 12 holes.

    Here's a look at the various Woods-related prop bets available at the Westgate:

    Will Woods make the 36-hole cut? Yes +150, No -180

    Lowest single-round score (both courses par 72): Over/Under 70

    Highest single-round score: Over/Under 74.5

    Will Woods finish inside the top 10? Yes +350, No -450

    Will Woods finish inside the top 20? Yes +170, No -200

    Will Woods withdraw during the tournament? Yes +650, No -1000

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    Monahan buoyed by Tour's sponsor agreements

    By Rex HoggardJanuary 24, 2018, 12:27 am

    SAN DIEGO – Farmers Insurance announced on Tuesday at Torrey Pines a seven-year extension of the company’s sponsorship of the Southern California PGA Tour event. This comes on the heels of Sony extending its sponsorship of the year’s first full-field event in Hawaii through 2022.

    Although these might seem to be relatively predictable moves, considering the drastic makeover of the Tour schedule that will begin with the 2018-19 season, it is a telling sign of the confidence corporations have in professional golf.

    “It’s a compliment to our players and the value that the sponsors are achieving,” Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said.

    Monahan said that before 2014 there were no 10-year title sponsorship agreements in place. Now there are seven events sponsored for 10-years, and another five tournaments that have agreements in place of at least seven years.

    “What it means is, it gives organizations like the Century Club [which hosts this week’s Farmers Insurance Open], when you have that level of stability on a long-term basis that allows you to invest in your product, to grow interest and to grow the impact of it,” Monahan said. “You experienced what this was like in 2010 or seen other tournaments that you don’t know what the future is.S o to go out and sell and inspire a community and you can’t state that we have a long-term agreement it’s more difficult.”

    Events like this year’s Houston Open, Colonial in Fort Worth, Texas, and The National all currently don’t have title sponsors – although officials at Colonial are confident they can piece together a sponsorship package. But even that is encouraging to Monahan considering the uncertainty surrounding next season’s schedule, which will include the PGA Championship moving to May and The Players to March as well as a pre-Labor Day finish to the season.

    “When you look back historically to any given year [the number of events needing sponsors] is lower than the typical average,” Monahan said. “As we start looking to a new schedule next year, you get excited about a great schedule with a great group of partners.”

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    Day WDs from Farmers pro-am because of sore back

    By Golf Channel DigitalJanuary 24, 2018, 12:07 am

    SAN DIEGO – Jason Day has withdrawn from the Wednesday pro-am at the Farmers Insurance Open, citing a sore back.

    Day, the 2015 champion, played a practice round with Tiger Woods and Bryson DeChambeau on Tuesday at Torrey Pines, and he is still expected to play in the tournament.

    Day was replaced in the pro-am by Whee Kim. 

    Making his first start since the Australian Open in November, Day is scheduled to tee off at 1:30 p.m. ET Thursday alongside Jon Rahm and Brandt Snedeker.

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    Farmers inks 7-year extension through 2026

    By Golf Channel DigitalJanuary 24, 2018, 12:04 am

    SAN DIEGO – Farmers Insurance has signed a seven-year extension to serve as the title sponsor for the PGA Tour event at Torrey Pines, it was announced Tuesday. The deal will run through 2026.

    “Farmers Insurance has been incredibly supportive of the tournament and the Century Club’s charitable initiatives since first committing to become the title sponsor in 2010,” PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said.


    Farmers Insurance Open: Articles, photos and videos


    “We are extremely grateful for the strong support of Farmers and its active role as title sponsor, and we are excited by the commitment Farmers has made to continue sponsorship of the Farmers Insurance Open for an additional seven years.

    In partnership with Farmers, the Century Club – the tournament’s host organization – has contributed more than $20 million to deserving organizations benefiting at-risk youth since 2010.