Notes Wittenberg Low Amateur

By Associated PressApril 11, 2004, 4:00 pm
AUGUSTA, Ga. -- The green jacket is going to someone else. Still, nobody can say they had a better finish at the Masters than amateur Casey Wittenberg.
 
The 19-year-old business major at Oklahoma State made three birdies and an eagle over the last six holes, and shot 31 on the back Sunday to finish 13th. The 31 tied the day's best back nines, by Sergio Garcia, K.J. Choi and Phil Mickelson, the fourth, third and first-place finishers.
 
More importantly for Wittenberg, it put him in a tie for 13th and earned him an automatic return trip to Augusta National next year.
 
'It's kind of indescribable, the way I feel,' Wittenberg said.
 
Wittenberg finished at even-par 288, the best score by an amateur since Charlie Coe, who also shot 288 in 1962. He became the first amateur to win a return trip back since Matt Kuchar in 1998. When Kuchar did it, the top 24 finishers qualified and he finished 21st. Now, it's the top 16.
 
Wittenberg's chances were dim when he made the turn at 38 and stood at 5 over. He said he felt momentum building when he hit his approach close for a birdie on the par-5 13th, then saved par from the woods on 14.
 
'It's really interesting to play with all the pros here,' he said. 'They all say that one shot can change the momentum of a round, and that's what happened today. You just have to keep on grinding.'
 
Wittenberg had his father on the bag and played the first two rounds with Tiger Woods. Even though Woods struggled all week - in fact, Wittenberg finished two strokes better than the three-time champion - the amateur said it was quite a learning experience.
 
'It showed me all the things I need to improve before I can make it with these guys,' he said. 'You can see where his game is really polished, and mine really isn't.'
 
Sergio's Surge
A birdie here, a made putt there earlier in the week, and maybe Sergio Garcia would have been celebrating his first major championship. Now, he might be replacing Phil Mickelson as The Best Player Never to Win a Major.
 
He certainly showed he had the stuff to make a charge down the stretch at Augusta. He made seven birdies and an eagle over the last 12 holes to push his score from 5 over to 3-under-par 285, good for fourth place.
 
'I feel like I played well enough to win, but unfortunately, I'm not going to,' Garcia said during an interview more than an hour before the leaders finished. 'That's the majors. It's not all about playing well. Sometimes, you've got to get lucky, too. A couple good breaks could have made the difference.'
 
Garcia went 2 over through the first six holes, but said it easily could have been 4 under.
 
He then ticked off the shots that slipped away, all because he felt he missed the right bounce by an inch or two. On No. 6, the ball was going so straight toward the hole, 'I thought I was making a 1. I can't even see the pin, it was going so straight at it.' Instead, it ran into the gallery and he made double bogey.
 
On No. 18, he hit an 8-iron to 20 feet and had the putt tracking to the hole, only to see it stop on the lip. As he walked to the hole to see just how close it was, he stopped and turned around - as though he just couldn't stand to look at such a near miss.
 
That putt wouldn't have made the difference. Still, a fourth-place finish wasn't bad, considering where he began the day.
 
'Unfortunately, I just didn't get the right breaks at the right time in the tournament,' he said.
 
Pair of Aces
Padraig Harrington and Kirk Triplett managed to do in 10 minutes what only seven other golfers have accomplished in the 67 previous years at the Masters.
 
Playing in back-to-back groups, Harrington and Triplett each aced the 16th hole Sunday afternoon. They were the eighth and ninth aces on the 170-yard hole, and the first since Raymond Floyd's in 1996.
 
'I was delighted,' Harrington said.
 
Harrington went first. Using a 7-iron, he put the ball on a slope 30 feet from the cup. The ball trickled down toward the hole, picking up speed before dropping in on the right side of the pin. Harrington's mouth dropped open as the crowd roared, and he exchanged high-fives with his caddie and playing partner Stewart Cink.
 
Fans were still applauding when Harrington walked onto the green, and he tipped his cap before picking up the ball and tossing it into the crowd.
 
The gallery had barely caught its breath when Triplett stepped up.
 
Using a 6-iron, he put the ball in almost the exact same spot as Harrington, and it, too, trickled down and into the hole. Triplett fell to the ground on his back, lying there spread-eagle before playing partner Fredrik Jacobson helped him up. Triplett beamed as he got to his feet, and the smile never left his face as he walked to the green.
 
'Just laying on the hallowed ground - I couldn't believe it,' Triplett said.
 
After his triumphant march, Triplett stopped a few feet from the hole before peering into the cup, almost as if he was afraid to look. He leaned forward again and, yes, the ball really was there. Triplett fished it out of the cup, kissed it and held onto it.
 
Divots
Jay Haas was one shot away from securing a spot in next year's Masters, but his score of 1 over left him in a tie for 17th, one spot out of the top-16 finish needed to guarantee his trip back. If the 50-year-old Haas, who is playing well, is able to qualify some other way, he will be the second-oldest player to compete without having won it. Tom Kite made it when he was 52. ... Justin Rose, the leader after the first and second rounds, rebounded with a 71 to finish at 2 over. He shot 81 on Saturday to fall out of contention. ... Chris Riley had the biggest fall of the 44 players who made the cut. He opened with at 2 under par, three strokes behind Rose, but then shot three straight 6-over 78s to finish at 16-over 304.
 
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    The Tiger comeback just got real on Friday

    By Randall MellFebruary 24, 2018, 1:11 am

    PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Slow play was a big storyline on the PGA Tour’s West Coast swing, but not so much anymore.

    Not with Tiger Woods speeding things up Friday at the Honda Classic.

    Not with Woods thumping the gas pedal around PGA National’s Champion Course, suddenly looking as if he is racing way ahead of schedule in his return to the game.

    The narrative wondrously started to turn here.

    It turned from wondering at week’s start if Woods could make the cut here, after missing it last week at the Genesis Open. His game was too wild for Riviera, where a second-round 76 left him looking lost with the Masters just six weeks away.

    It turned in head-spinning fashion Friday with Woods climbing the leaderboard in tough conditions to get himself into weekend contention with a 1-over-par 71.

    He is just four shots off the lead.

    “I’d be shocked if he’s not there Sunday with a chance to win,” said Brandt Snedeker, who played alongside Woods in the first two rounds. “He’s close to playing some really, really good golf.”

    Just a few short months ago, so many of us were wondering if Woods was close to washed up.

    “He’s only going to improve,” Snedeker said. “The more time he has, as the weather gets warmer, he’ll feel better and be able to practice more.”

    Snedeker has had a front-row seat for this speedy Tiger turnaround. He played the third round with Woods at the Farmers Insurance Open last month. That was Woods’ first PGA Tour start in a year.


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    How much improvement did Snedeker see from that Torrey Pines experience?

    “It was kind of what I expected – significantly improved,” Snedeker said. “His iron game is way better. His driver is way better. I don’t’ see it going backward from here.”

    This was the hope packed into Friday’s new narrative.

    “I’m right there in the ballgame,” Woods said. “I really played well today. I played well all day today.”

    Tiger sent a jolt through PGA National when his name hit the top 10 of the leaderboard. He didn’t do it with a charge. He did it battling a brutish course in wintry, blustery winds, on “scratchy” and “dicey” greens that made par a good score.

    When Woods holed a 25-foot putt at the ninth to move into red numbers at 1 under overall and within three shots of the lead, a roar shook across the Champion Course.

    “It got a little loud, which was cool to see,” Snedeker said. “It’s great to have that energy and vibe back.”

    Woods sent fans scampering to get into position, blasting a 361-yard drive at the 10th, cutting the corner. He had them buzzing when he stuck his approach to 9 feet for another birdie chance to get within two of the lead.

    “I thought if he makes it, this place will go nuts, and he could get it going like he used to,” Snedeker said.

    Woods missed, but with the leaders falling back to him on this grueling day, he stuck his approach at the 12th to 10 feet to give himself a chance to move within a shot of the lead.

    It’s another putt that could have turned PGA National upside down, but Woods missed that.

    “It really is hard to make birdies,” he said. “At least I found it hard. It was hard to get the ball close, even if the ball is in the fairway, it's still very difficult to get the ball close, with the wind blowing as hard as it is. It’s hard to make putts out here.”

    Patton Kizzire, a two-time PGA Tour winner who won just last month at the Sony Open, could attest to how tough the test at Honda has become. He played alongside Woods this week for the first time in his career. He shot 78 Friday and missed the cut.

    Kizzire had a close-up look at what suddenly seems possible for Woods again.

    “He’s figuring it out,” Kizzire said. “He hit some nice shots and rolled in some nice putts. It was pretty impressive.”

    Woods could not hide his excitement in getting himself in the weekend hunt, but his expectations remain tempered in this comeback. He knows the daily referendums his game is subject to, how we can all make the highs too high and the lows too low.

    “We’ve got a long way to go,” Woods said.

    Woods lost a tee shot in a bush at the second hole and made bogey. He hit his tee shot in the water at the 15th and made double bogey. He three-putted the 16th to make bogey. He knows this course can derail a player’s plans in a hurry, but he knows his game is quickly coming around.

    “I’m right there where I can win a golf tournament,” Woods said. “Four back on this golf course with 36 holes to go, I mean, anybody can win this golf tournament right now. It’s wide open.’”

    Woods hit his shot of the day at the 17th to right his game after the struggles at the 15th and 16th. He did so in front of the Goslings Bear Trap Party Pavilion, cutting a 5-iron to 12 feet. It was the hardest hole on the course Friday, with nearly one of every three players rinsing a shot in the water there. Woods made birdie there to ignite an explosion of cheers.  He got a standing ovation.

    “I was telling you guys, I love Riviera, I just don't play well there,” Woods said. “So here we are, we're back at a golf course I know and I play well here.”

    So here we are, on the precipice of something special again?

    Woods seems in a hurry to find out.

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    List, Lovemark lead; Tiger four back at Honda

    By Associated PressFebruary 24, 2018, 12:41 am

    PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Even with a tee shot into the water for another double bogey, Tiger Woods could see the big picture in the Honda Classic.

    He was four shots out of the lead going into the weekend.

    Luke List delivered a round not many others found possible in such difficult conditions Friday, a 4-under 66 that gave him a share of the lead with Jamie Lovemark (69). They were at 3-under 137, the highest score to lead at the halfway point of the Honda Classic since it moved to PGA National in 2007.

    So bunched were the scores that Woods was four shots out of the lead and four shots from last place among the 76 players who made the cut at 5-over 145. More importantly, he only had 13 players in front of him.

    ''This is a difficult golf course right now,'' Woods said. ''Making pars is a good thing. I've done that, and I'm right there with a chance.''

    And he has plenty of company.


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    Tommy Fleetwood, who won the Race to Dubai on the European Tour last year, scratched out a 68 and was one shot out of the lead along with Webb Simpson (72), Russell Henley (70) and Rory Sabbatini (69).

    Justin Thomas and Daniel Berger each shot 72 and were in a large group at 139. They were among only 10 players remaining under par.

    Fleetwood laughed when asked the last time he was at 2 under after 36 holes and only one shot out of the lead.

    ''Maybe some junior event,'' he said. ''It's good, though. These are the toughest test in golf. Generally, one of the best players prevail at the end of weeks like this. Weeks like this challenge you to the ultimate level. Whether you shoot two 80s or you lead after two rounds, you can see what you need to do and see where your game is. Because this is as hard as it's ever going to get for you.''

    The difficulty was primarily from the wind, which blew just as hard in the morning when List shot his 66 as it did in the afternoon. More aggravating to the players are the greens, which are old and bare, firm and crusty. It's a recipe for not making many putts.

    Defending champion Rickie Fowler had six bogeys on his front nine and shot 77 to miss the cut.

    ''It's unfortunate that the greens have changed this much in a year,'' Fowler said. ''They typically get slick and quick on the weekend because they dry out, but at least there's some sort of surface. But like I said, everyone's playing the same greens.''

    It looked as though List was playing a different course when he went out with a bogey-free 32 on the back nine, added a pair of birdies on the front nine and then dropped his only shot when he caught an awkward lie in the bunker on the par-3 seventh.

    ''It's very relentless,'' List said. ''There's not really too many easy holes, but if you hit fairways and go from there, you can make a few birdies out there.''

    List and Lovemark, both Californians, have never won on the PGA Tour. This is the third time List has had at least a share of the 36-hole lead, most recently in South Korea at the CJ Cup, where he shot 76-72 on the weekend.

    ''It's kind of irrelevant because there's going to be 30 guys within a couple shots of the lead,'' List said. ''It's going to be that type of week.''

    He was exaggerating – there were 11 players within three shots of the lead.

    And there was another guy four shots behind.

    Woods brought big energy to a Friday afternoon that already was hopping before he overcame a sluggish start and holed a 25-foot birdie putt on No. 9 to make the turn at 1 under for his round, and leaving him two shots out of the lead. Everyone knew it just from listening to the roars.

    Woods had his chances, twice missing birdie putts from inside 10 feet at Nos. 10 and 12, sandwiched around a 12-foot par save. His round appeared to come undone when he found the water on the 15th and made double bogey for the second straight day.

    Then, he hit out of a fairway bunker, over the water and onto the green at the dangerous 16th hole and faced a 65-foot putt. He misread the speed and the line, so badly that it was similar to a car driving from Chicago to Denver and winding up in Phoenix. A bogey dropped him to 2 over.

    The big moment was the 17th hole, 184 waters into the wind and over water. That's where Rory McIlroy made triple bogey earlier in the day that ruined his otherwise solid round of 72, leaving him seven behind. Making it even tougher for Woods is the Brandt Snedeker hit 5-iron before him to about 6 feet. Woods got to the tee and the wind died, meaning 5-iron was too much and 6-iron wouldn't clear the water.

    He went with the 5-iron.

    ''I started that thing pretty far left and hit a pretty big cut in there because I had just too much stick,'' Wood said.

    It landed 12 feet below the hole for a birdie putt.

    Thomas made 17 pars and a double bogey when he three-putted from 6 feet on No. 16. He felt the same way as Woods.

    ''I'm in a good spot – really good spot – going into this week,'' Thomas said.

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    Woods to play with Dufner (12:10 p.m.) in third round

    By Golf Channel DigitalFebruary 24, 2018, 12:10 am

    PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Tiger Woods will play alongside Jason Dufner in the third round of the Honda Classic.

    Woods and Dufner, both at 1-over 141, four shots back, will tee off at 12:10 p.m. ET Saturday at PGA National. They’re in the 10th-to-last group.


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    Co-leaders Luke List and Jamie Lovemark will go at 1:40 p.m.

    Some of the other late pairings include Justin Thomas and Daniel Berger, who will be playing together for the third consecutive day, at 1 p.m.; Louis Oosthuizen and Thomas Pieters (1:10 p.m.); and Webb Simpson and Russell Henley, in the penultimate group at 1:30 p.m.

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    Woods doesn't mind 'fun' but brutal 17th hole

    By Ryan LavnerFebruary 23, 2018, 11:55 pm

    PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Tiger Woods doesn’t mind the boisterous crowd that surrounds the par-3 17th hole at PGA National.

    And why should he?

    When the wind died down Friday afternoon, Woods played a “big ol’ cut” with a 5-iron that dropped 12 feet from the cup. He made the putt – one of just nine birdies on the day – and when he walked off the green, the fans gave him a standing ovation.

    The scene is expected to be even more raucous Saturday at the Honda Classic, especially with Woods in contention.

    There is a Goslings Bear Trap tent just to the right of the tee. The hole has become a hot topic in recent years, after a few players complained that the noise from the nearby crowd was distracting as they tried to play a wind-blown, 190-yard shot over water.


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    Woods was asked his thoughts on the party setup after finishing his second-round 71.

    “As long as they don’t yell in our golf swings, we’re fine,” he said. “They can be raucous. They are having a great time. It’s fun. They are having a blast, and hopefully we can execute golf shots, but as long as they don’t yell in our golf swings, everything’s cool.”

    After the recent Waste Management Phoenix Open, a few players told Woods that fans were trying to time their screams with the players’ downswings.

    “There’s really no reason to do that,” Woods said. “I think that most of the people there at 17 are golfers, and they understand how hard a golf shot that is. So they are being respectful, but obviously libations are flowing.”

    The 17th played as the most difficult hole on the course Friday, with a 3.74 scoring average and a combined score to par of 104 over. More than a quarter of the tee shots found the water.