Appreciation and Annoyance - COPIED

By Brian HewittMay 1, 2008, 4:00 pm
The Comebacker continues to field the debate on whether or not Trevor Immelman was a worthy champion at the Masters Tournament earlier this month.
 
Plus, The Comebacker appears to be getting under the skin of at least one reader.
 
Without further ado:
 
Sue writes: Brian, I think you are a complete idiot.
 
The Comebacker
And exactly what does that have to do with golf?
 

Connie writes: After reading The Comebacker, it is amazing to me that golf enthusiasts can be so narrow minded. We all have favorite golfers and when mine is either not playing or playing and not faring so well, I am pleased to be watching others and enjoy their shotmaking. These men are called professionals for a reason. Let's lay off of the criticism and give the guys their due. There are a number of golfers who have won only one major. Is there a problem with giving them their due for the one they have one? Many professionals will play their whole career and never win a major, and why should that take anything away from the work they do to compete. In Immelman's case, he was fortunate to even be on the course with the health issues he has had in the past year. Congratulations, and I would not be surprised to see him win another. The world of golf ought to be about ALL professional golfers not just a select few.
 
The Comebacker
Connie, I think you are a complete idiot..No, no, just kidding.Actually I think Trevor Immelmans health issues could have turned out to be a helping factor. After waiting for biopsy results, the pressure of trying to compete in the Masters cant possibly feel as intense.
 
Tom writes: Ill get to the point. Even though I appreciate the tremendously deep talent pool on the PGA Tour, I have definitely become a victim of what I call Majoritis Tigris..No, it probably wasnt the most exciting Masters of recent times, but a great tournament nevertheless. We all know the reasons for the final outcome and a simple hats off to Mr. Immelman.Dont get me wrong, I still genuinely appreciate the quality of golf played by these guys; but I think I have become so jaded by the emphasis placed on Majors, and Tigers flair for the ridiculously absurd, that my expectations for non-major events sans El Tigre have evaporated. Knowing that there will never be a fifth major, and that Tigers schedule will only get skinnier from here on in, I eagerly await the next prodigy/phenom to follow in his footsteps and rekindle my fervor for the everyday events. Someone please step up and save me from the doldrums!
 
The Comebacker
So with Tiger now rehabbing his knee after recent surgery are you suffering from Minoritis Tigris?
 
Ed writes:It just dawned on me what Trevor did in The Masters. There is a maneuver called 'an Immelmann' named after a German, WWI fighter ace. This is where you fly level to gain speed, then pull up into a steep climb until you are inverted, roll the plane back to horizontal and proceed the other direction. It is done to get another fighter off your tail. Trevor made that move on Tiger last week who was too far back to shoot him down.
 
The Comebacker
It never dawned on me that this Masters was all about aviation.
 

Canada Boy writes: I think I may have figured out why Brandt Snedeker had a rough Sunday and didn't win The Masters---three words--Toronto Maple Leafs. I noticed his caddie was wearing a Maple Leaf T-shirt under his white coveralls. As a die hard Leafs fan, I am well aware that we have not won the Stanley Cup since 1967. Once I saw that T-shirt, I knew Snedeker was not carrying around a particularly effective good luck charm. And those high paid analysts thought it was the Sunday pressure.
 
The Comebacker
Good thing, I guess, Mike Weir isnt a Maple Leafs fan.
 

Chris writes: Heres to Trevor, a classy kid with a future ahead of him. Sorry folks, until Tiger becomes impervious to bullets, leaps buildings in a single bound, and has to start wearing a size larger to conceal his red and blue suit and cape, he is going to lose every once in a while. As my friends constantly reminds me why one day I shoot well, and the next day I suck (a 25-handicap), thats golf.
 
The Comebacker
Or Tiger himself has said or more than one occasion, Welcome to golf.
 

Dale writes:NO, NO, NO, a thousand times - NO - to Olympic golf. This will be just another snafu that'll be nothing but problems for EVERYONE. The OLYMPICS are nothing but more corruption, stealing, more hassle about drug testing, and a lot more, ALL unpleasant disputes. - NOBODY needs it. Let's call it FINCHEM'S FOLLY
 
The Comebacker
I take it, by the use of all those capital letters, Dale doesnt think golf in the Olympics is a capital idea.
 
Larry writes: When watching the PGA (TOUR), I know for a down home fact that I could never play to that level but now and then when I am watching the LPGA I feel maybe I could hit a shot or two the way they play. After watching Lorena and those young ladies play recently, cancel the maybe thought and insert no way. What wonderful golf we are privileged to see now.'
 
The Comebacker
Indeed, these women are good. Especially Lorena.
 

Jan writes: Without Tiger teeing it up, theres a Tiger-esque feeling being generated by Ochoa. It makes me wonder if we arent going to ascribe Elvis-esque attributes after Tiger leaves this life for the next, refusing to believe hes really gone, spotting him on this or that golf course. Perhaps his ghost will visit Augusta National every April. Is it possible to go even one hour one simple broadcast hour without mentioning Tiger Woods? But back to Lorena momentarily she is amazing shes closing in on Nancy Lopezs record lets highlight that and leave Tiger out of womens golf.
 
The Comebacker
Im guessing if Jan had to use one adjective to describe Tigers incipient course design in the Middle East, it would be arabesque.
 
Shawn writes: I'm curious, why there hasn't been any talk of Lorena playing in a men's event? With her recent great play she seems to have been crowned the queen of the LPGA.
 
The Comebacker
She seems disinclined to play on the PGA TOUR. The marketing experts say she could raise her profit margins with the wider exposure a start on the PGA TOUR would provide (like it did for Annika Sorenstam) But unlike Annika, Ochoa doesnt feel the need to measure her skill sets against those of the best men.
 

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McCoy earns medalist honors at Web.com Q-School

By Will GrayDecember 11, 2017, 12:30 am

One year after his budding career was derailed by a car accident, Lee McCoy got back on track by earning medalist honors at the final stage of Web.com Tour Q-School.

McCoy shot a final-round 65 at Whirlwind Golf Club in Chandler, Ariz., to finish the 72-hole event at 28 under. That total left him two shots ahead of Sung-Jae Im and guaranteed him fully-exempt status on the developmental circuit in 2018.

It's an impressive turnaround for the former University of Georgia standout who finished fourth at the 2016 Valspar Championship as an amateur while playing alongside Jordan Spieth in the final round. But he broke his wrist in a car accident the day before second stage of Q-School last year, leaving him without status on any major tour to begin the year.

McCoy was not the only player who left Arizona smiling. Everyone in the top 10 and ties will be exempt through the first 12 events of the new Web.com Tour season, a group that includes former amateur standouts Curtis Luck (T-3), Sam Burns (T-10) and Maverick McNealy (T-10).

Players who finished outside the top 10 but inside the top 45 and ties earned exemptions into the first eight events of 2018. That group includes Cameron Champ (T-16), who led the field in driving at this year's U.S. Open as an amateur, and Wyndham Clark (T-23).

Everyone who advanced to the final stage of Q-School will have at least conditional Web.com Tour status in 2018. Among those who failed to secure guaranteed starts this week were Robby Shelton, Rico Hoey, Jordan Niebrugge, Joaquin Niemann and Kevin Hall.

Els honored with Heisman Humanitarian Award

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 10, 2017, 11:41 pm

The annual Heisman Trophy award ceremony is one of the biggest moments in any football season, but there was a touching non-football moment as well on Saturday night as Ernie Els received the Heisman Humanitarian Award.

The award, which had been announced in August, recognized Els' ongoing efforts on behalf of his Els for Autism foundation. Els received the award at Manhattan's PlayStation Theater, where Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield won the Heisman Trophy.

Els, 47, founded Els for Autism in 2009 with his wife after their son, Ben, was diagnosed with autism. Their efforts have since flourished into a 26-acre campus in Jupiter, Fla., and the creation of the Els Center for Excellence in 2015.

The Heisman Humanitarian Award has been given out since 2006. Past recipients include NBA center David Robinson, NFL running back Warrick Dunn, soccer star Mia Hamm and NASCAR driver Jeff Gordon.

A native of South Africa, Els won the U.S. Open in 1994 and 1997 and The Open in 2002 and 2012. He has won 19 times on the PGA Tour and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2011.

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Monday finish for Joburg Open; Sharma leads by 4

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 10, 2017, 8:57 pm

Rain, lightning and hail pushed the Joburg Open to a Monday finish, with India’s Shubhankar Sharma holding a four-stroke lead with 11 holes to play in Johannesburg.

Play is scheduled to resume at 7:30 a.m. local time.

South Africa’s Erik van Rooyen will have a 3-foot putt for birdie to move within three shots of Sharma wen play resumes at the Randpark Golf Club. Sarma is at 22 under par.

Tapio Pulkkanen of Finland and James Morrison of England are tied for third at 14 under. Pulkkanen has 10 holes remaining, Morrison 11.

The top three finishers who are not already exempt, will get spots in next year’s Open Championship at Carnoustie.

 

 

Stricker, O'Hair team to win QBE Shootout

By Will GrayDecember 10, 2017, 8:55 pm

It may not count in the official tally, but Steve Stricker is once again in the winner's circle on the PGA Tour.

Stricker teamed with Sean O'Hair to win the two-person QBE Shootout, as the duo combined for a better-ball 64 in the final round to finish two shots clear of Graeme McDowell and Shane Lowry. It's the second win in this event for both men; Stricker won with Jerry Kelly back in 2009 while O'Hair lifted the trophy with Kenny Perry in 2012.

Stricker and O'Hair led wire-to-wire in the 54-hole, unofficial event after posting a 15-under 57 during the opening-round scramble.

"We just really gelled well together," Stricker said. "With his length the first day, getting some clubs into the greens, some short irons for me, we just fed off that first day quite a bit. We felt comfortable with one another."


Full-field scores from the QBE Shootout


Stricker won 12 times during his PGA Tour career, most recently at the 2012 Tournament of Champions. More recently the 50-year-old has been splitting his time on the PGA Tour Champions and captained the U.S. to a victory at the Presidents Cup in October. O'Hair has four official Tour wins, most recently at the 2011 RBC Canadian Open.

Pat Perez and Brian Harman finished alone in third, four shots behind Stricker and O'Hair. Lexi Thompson and Tony Finau, the lone co-ed pairing in the 12-team event, finished among a tie for fourth.