Five Myths About Peak Performers

By David BreslowNovember 9, 2005, 5:00 pm
You have the same mind that a peak performer has. The Performance Laws and Principles apply to you as well as they apply to them. Here are five myths commonly thought about Peak Performers:
 
MYTH #1
Peak Performers Try to Control Everything

Here is where peak performers outshine others. They understand the PARADOX of performance. They realize that over doing and over trying actually interfere with their ability to play better. When you over try, over think and over control; you reduce your effectiveness. Combining toughness with the ability to relax, let go and trust is the ultimate state of the peak performer. It is the state of NON-CONTROL that creates a natural release of their talents.
 
Strategic Tip: You can only control one personYOU! Take note of how many things you try to control. Let go of anything you truly cant control. A high need for control usually means a LOW confidence level. The higher your confidence the less desire you will have to control other people, places or situations.
 
MYTH #2
Peak moments only occur for Peak Performers

Really? Peak performance can occur for anyone at any time. Sure, peak performers come closer than others but they practice the habits that induce it. You can elicit peak performances by practicing daily habits of focus and relaxation, trusting yourself more and learning how to remain calm and relaxed. This has nothing to do with skills. It all begins within!
 
Strategic Tip: Use your powers of Active Imagination to see yourself performing the way you want to. Your body doesnt know the difference between fantasy and reality so see it the way you want it! Write down your experience of what it was like when in the zone and take note of what you were thinking, feeling and doing.
 
MYTH #3
Peak Performers Induce Peak Performances On Command

When you witness a great performance by anyone, an athlete, entertainer, musician or actor, does it appear they are struggling or forcing it? I doubt it. Forcing a performance when youre not playing your best simply does not work. Playing your best under these conditions requires a commitment to focus, solid preparation, believable mental game plans and a commitment to compete no matter what.
 
Strategic Plan: Top performances are released not forced. Create a believable mental game plan, a performance plan and prepare with effective routines. Demonstrate your routines during the performance at all times and continue to trust that you have what you need.
 
MYTH #4
Top Performers Dont Need A Coach

The best never make it there alone. They understand the importance of having people around them who help foster success. As the old saying goes...Even Michael Jordan needed a coach. So does Tiger Woods or any one else you can think of. The best have someone behind them supporting, pushing, and driving their success.
 
Strategic Tip: Are you giving yourself the best chance to be successful? Is what youre doing getting you what you want? If not, seek the wise counsel of others who can help.
 
MYTH #5
You Must Have Years of Extensive Training to Experience Peak Moments

Anyone can experience a peak performance. When you know the mind/body/performance principles and follow their laws of operation you can raise the level of your performance and do it more consistently.
 
Strategic Tip: Always foster faith in yourself. This occurs by following through, committing to sticking with routines, preparing smartly and reduce personal judgments and criticisms.
 
You already have the tools to be a peak performer no matter what your current skill level. It all begins WITHIN!
 
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    Copyright 2005 David Breslow. David is the author of Wired To Win and offers the highly acclaimed Wired To Win programs for athletes and business/sales professionals to help them perform at the top of their game!. His unique approach helps people make quantum leap shifts! David has appeared on The Golf Channel, ESPN radio, etc. For more programs/services/products or sign up for a free newsletter (write newsletter in subject box). Contact: David Breslow 847.681.1698 Email: David@theflowzone.net or visit the web: www.theflowzone.net. For book orders call toll free: 1.888.280.7715.
  • Getty Images

    Sharma closes on Monday, wins Joburg Open

    By Associated PressDecember 11, 2017, 12:43 pm

    JOHANNESBURG – Shubhankar Sharma won his first European Tour title by a shooting 3-under 69 Monday in the final round of the weather-delayed Joburg Open.

    The 21-year-old Indian resumed his round on the eighth green after play was halted early Sunday afternoon because of storms. He parred that hole, birdied No. 9 and made par on every hole on the back nine.


    Full-field scores from the Joburg Open


    Sharma finished at 23-under 264, three strokes ahead of the pack, and qualified for next year's British Open, too.

    ''I actually wasn't going to come here about a week ago ... so I'm really happy that I came,'' said Sharma, who shot 61 in the second round. ''I don't think I'm ever going forget my first time in South Africa.''

    Erik van Rooyen (66) was second, three strokes ahead of Shaun Norris (65) and Tapio Pulkkanen (68).

    Getty Images

    Newsmakers of the Year: Top 10 in 2017

    By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 11, 2017, 12:30 pm
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    Sharma among three Open qualifiers at Joburg Open

    By Will GrayDecember 11, 2017, 12:16 pm

    Shubhankar Sharma earned his first career European Tour win at the rain-delayed Joburg Open and punched his ticket to The Open in the process.

    Sharma returned to Randpark Golf Club Monday morning after storms washed out much of the scheduled final day of play. Beginning the re-start with a four-shot lead, he hung on to win by three over South Africa's Erik Van Rooyen.

    Both men can make travel plans for Carnoustie next summer, as this was the second event in the Open Qualifying Series with three spots available for players not otherwise exempt who finished inside the top 10. The final spot went to Shaun Norris, who tied for third with Finland's Tapio Pulkkanen but had a higher world ranking (No. 192) than Pulkkanen (No. 197) entering the week.

    The Joburg Open was the final official European Tour event of the year. The next tournament in the Open Qualifying Series will be the SMBC Singapore Open in January, where four spots at Carnoustie will be up for grabs.

    Rules changes include no more viewer call-ins

    By Rex HoggardDecember 11, 2017, 12:00 pm

    Although the Rules of Golf modernization is still a year away, officials continue to refine parts of the rulebook including an overhaul of the video review protocols.

    A “working group” led by the USGA and R&A announced on Monday the new protocols, which include assigning a rule official to a tournament broadcast to resolve rules issues.

    The group – which includes the PGA Tour, European Tour, LPGA tour and PGA of America – also voted to stop considering viewer call-ins when processing potential rule violations.

    In addition, a new local rule was announced that will discontinue the penalty for signing an incorrect scorecard when the player was unaware of the violation.

    In April, Lexi Thompson was penalized four strokes during the final round when officials at the ANA Inspiration learned via e-mail from a viewer of an infraction that occurred during the third round. Thompson was penalized two strokes for incorrectly marking her golf ball and two for signing an incorrect scorecard.

    “The message is, as a fan, enjoy watching the game and the best players in the world, but also have the confidence that the committee in charge of the competition have the rules handled,” Thomas Pagel, the USGA’s senior director of the Rules of Golf, said on Golf Channel’s "Morning Drive" on Monday. “Let’s leave the rules and the administration of the event to the players and to those responsible for running the tournament.”

    The working group was created in April to review the use of video in applying the rules and the role of viewer call-ins, and initially issued a decision to limit the use of video through the introduction of the “reasonable judgment” and “naked eye” standard.

    According to that decision, which was not a rule, “so long as the player does what can reasonably be expected under the circumstances to make an accurate determination, the player’s reasonable judgment will be accepted, even if later shown to be inaccurate by the use of video evidence.”

    The new protocols will be implemented starting on Jan. 1.

    A comprehensive overhaul of the Rules of Golf is currently underway by the USGA and R&A that will begin on Jan. 1, 2019.