Notes: Spieth invited to Mickelson's money game

By Doug FergusonSeptember 18, 2013, 10:28 pm

MICKELSON GAME:Phil Mickelson had planned to bring Jordan Spieth into his money game last week at the BMW Championship. Mickelson wants younger players involved to get them ready for matches that really matter, like the Presidents Cup in two weeks.

Mickelson didn't get to Chicago until that Wednesday night because of personal reasons, so they played Wednesday at East Lake.

Spieth did great. Or at least, he had a great partner.

Word is that Spieth and Steve Stricker won the match and every press against Mickelson and Keegan Bradley, with Stricker doing most of the damage. Butch Harmon, who walked most of the day with them, had Stricker down for seven birdies and an eagle. Asked if that was the case, Stricker smiled and said, ''I didn't keep track.''

So, yes.

Mickelson and Bradley were a tough team at the Ryder Cup. Could a partnership of the 46-year-old Stricker and 20-year-old Spieth make its debut at Muirfield Village?


WOODS MEET WITH FINCHEM:Tiger Woods was asked twice about his position on television viewers able to call in possible rules infractions. He never answered that question directly.

That's not to suggest he had nothing to say about the role of TV.

Woods, who met with PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem before his news conference Wednesday at the Tour Championship, said there needs to be a time limit on calling in potential infractions. He also stated the obvious – that he's on TV a lot more than anyone else.

''I think with HDTV, I think that's been a huge transition,'' Woods said. ''I think that there are certainly a lot more viewer call-ins, and I think what people don't realize is that our rules staff gets quite a few calls every week. A lot of them never see the light of day, but they're handled with the players.

''It's a new age in which there is a lot of cameras that are around – well, around my group and then some of the top players,'' he said. ''I think the commissioner was right. We're going to have to have more discussions about it in the future. I think that's actually happening right now.''

Finchem had said Tuesday that one of the issues is determining when it would be reasonable to accept outside information, and he raised the notion of a time limit. Finchem said the tour will ''probably be taking another harder look'' after the season, though he might have been talking about the impact of television more than the viewer calling in.

''You've got to start with disqualification and then work our way back from there,'' Woods said. ''What's going to happen over a course of time? Is every player going to be mandated to have a camera follow them around everywhere they go - all 156 players for every shot? Or is there a certain time limit when we're going to have to do it? The digital age, is it going to change?

''These are all questions and answers that need to be resolved in the near future.''

There are discussions about television across golf, though not necessarily a fan's ability to report what he sees.

Thomas Pagel, the USGA's senior director of rules and competition, spoke in vague terms about this Tuesday when he said the USGA and R&A are looking at issues they should tackle and that ''certainly, HDTV has been on the forefront for the last several years.''

Stay tuned.


STENSON DRIVER: Henrik Stenson has a new driver for the Tour Championship.

That's not all by choice.

Stenson lost his temper on the final hole of the BMW Championship and snapped the head off his driver. He has upgraded to a new model that he had been working with since July but never felt he had enough time to put it into play.

Now is a good time, which might explain why he got rid of the old driver the way he did. Or maybe not.

''Yeah, absolutely,'' Stenson said as his dry humor began to emerge. ''That was the main focus. Get something with a little bit less spin. Let's finish the old one off right here and now in front of everybody on 18. Perfect.''


HAVE JACKET, WILL TRAVEL: Masters champion Adam Scott talked earlier this year about the joy of waking up in The Bahamas and having a green jacket in his closet.

It doesn't stay there.

Scott says he packs golf's most famous jacket for just about every trip, including the Tour Championship.

''It's here with me,'' Scott said with a smile. ''It comes pretty much everywhere. I wear it in my hotel room all the time just by myself.''

He was kidding about the last part - maybe.

Scott said sometimes he packs the green jacket in his luggage, ''but I don't mind carrying it around.''


LAST CHANCE: Steve Stricker (No. 6 seed) could finish second at the Tour Championship and still win the FedEx Cup if Tiger Woods is 16th or worse and the next four seeds finish out of the top 10. That would mean Stricker could capture the $10 million prize without ever winning a tournament this year.

It almost happened in 2010 with Paul Casey.

In the six previous FedEx Cups, only twice has a player won the cup without winning the Tour Championship – Woods in 2009 (Phil Mickelson won the tournament) and Vijay Singh in 2008, when the points system was so messed up that Singh only had to complete four rounds at East Lake that week.

Stricker, meanwhile, is among 13 players at East Lake who are still searching for their first win. And three of those players – Graham DeLaet, Robert Castro and Brendon De Jonge – have never won on tour in their careers.

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Spieth: 'I feel great about the state of my game'

By Will GrayFebruary 19, 2018, 1:43 am

LOS ANGELES – Jordan Spieth is starting to feel confident again with the putter, which is probably a bad sign for the rest of the PGA Tour.

Spieth struggled on the greens two weeks ago at TPC Scottsdale, but he began to right the ship at Pebble Beach and cracked the top 10 this week at the Genesis Open. Perhaps more important than his final spot on the leaderboard was his standing in the strokes gained putting category – 12th among the field at Riviera Country Club, including a 24-putt performance in the third round.

Spieth closed out the week with a 4-under 67 to finish in a tie for ninth, five shots behind Bubba Watson. But after the round he spoke like a man whose preparation for the season’s first major is once again right on track.


Full-field scores from the Genesis Open

Genesis Open: Articles, photos and videos


“I was kind of, you know, skiing uphill with my putting after Phoenix and the beginning of Pebble week, and really just for a little while now through the new year,” Spieth said. “I just made some tremendous progress. I putted extremely well this week, which is awesome. I feel great about the state of my game going forward, feel like I’m in a great place at this time of the year as we’re starting to head into major season.”

Spieth will take a break next week, and where he next tees it up remains uncertain. He still has not announced a decision about playing or skipping the WGC-Mexico Championship, and he will have until 5 p.m. ET Friday to make a final decision on the no-cut event.

Whether or not he flies down to Mexico City, Spieth’s optimism has officially returned after a brief hiccup on the West Coast swing.

“For where I was starting out Phoenix to where I am and how I feel about my game going forward the rest of the year, there was a lot of progress made,” he said. “Now I’ve just got to figure out what the best schedule is for myself as we head into the Masters.”

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McIlroy encouraged by T-20: 'Didn’t quite reflect how I played'

By Will GrayFebruary 19, 2018, 1:23 am

LOS ANGELES – Rory McIlroy sees plenty of reasons to smile despite the fact that the first half of his 2018 Masters prep has officially wrapped without lifting a trophy.

After an injury-plagued campaign last year, McIlroy set out an ambitious schedule that called for eight worldwide starts before heading down Magnolia Lane. He started off with a pair of near-misses in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, then followed last week’s missed cut at Pebble Beach with a T-20 finish at the Genesis Open.

McIlroy birdied his final two holes to close with a 3-under 68 at Riviera Country Club, his lowest score of the week. He explained that a “destructive” tee shot on the 12th hole Saturday led to a double bogey and stunted any potential momentum, but he remained encouraged after closing the week on a high note.

“I feel like the position that I finished didn’t quite reflect how I played,” McIlroy said. “I feel like I played better than finishing whatever it is, 25th or whatever it’s going to be. I feel good about my game, just need to sharpen up a couple little areas here and there. But for the most part it’s been OK.”


Full-field scores from the Genesis Open

Genesis Open: Articles, photos and videos


McIlroy will now head across the country to tee it up in the Honda Classic, where he reached world No. 1 for the first time with a win in 2012 and also lost in a playoff in 2014. Although he continued to tinker with his putter this week following a mediocre effort on the greens at Pebble Beach, he believes that some of his putting woes may be solved simply by swapping out tricky poa annua surfaces for more familiar Bermuda greens.

“It was nice to play sort of early the last couple days, the greens didn’t get too crusty or too bumpy. I felt like even coming down the last few holes there, they were still good surfaces,” McIlroy said. “Nice to get back onto Bermuda and surfaces being a little truer than what we’ve experienced the last couple weeks.”

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Opinions split on lengthening No. 5 at Augusta

By Will GrayFebruary 19, 2018, 1:07 am

LOS ANGELES – Few topics spark a diverse range of player opinions quite like the whisper of changes to Augusta National Golf Club, and the latest proposed alteration of the par-4 fifth hole is no exception.

According to an Augusta Chronicle report, the club has submitted preliminary plans that would call for the construction of a new tee later this year behind what currently is Old Berckmans Road. The new tee could reportedly lengthen the hole by 20-30 yards and would alleviate congestion with the adjacent fourth green. It would also signal the first club-enacted changes to the famed layout since 2006.

Phil Mickelson has three green jackets hanging in his closet, and he sees no problem with adding teeth to a hole that already measures 455 yards on the scorecard.

“I’m a big fan of making the hard holes harder and the easy holes easier,” Mickelson said Sunday at the Genesis Open. “So making No. 5 harder, which is perennially a difficult par, or should be one of the harder par-4s out there, I’m a big fan of. What I’m not a fan of is taking a hole like 7 and making it the second-toughest par on the golf course. I think that’s a mistake. I think making 5 more difficult is not.”


Full-field scores from the Genesis Open

Genesis Open: Articles, photos and videos


Jordan Spieth believes the proposed changes would force driver into players’ hands on what he described as a “3-wood hole” given the pitch of the fairway, and added that firm and fast conditions could potentially push a longer fifth hole to the brink of playability.

“It would make an already very difficult hole even harder,” Spieth said. “If the greens are firm and fast, then it’s a pretty dicey hole given how severe that green is. But when you can still land a mid-iron on and stop it on the back of that green, then it makes sense. So I think they’d probably do a mix of the tees.”

While former champs Mickelson and Spieth welcome the promise of a more difficult Masters test, Graeme McDowell simply shook his head and grinned before explaining that his love of Augusta National remains unrequited after nine career Masters appearances.

“That green, it’s just not a 5-iron green. I’m sort of hitting between 5- and 7-iron into there as it is,” McDowell said. “It’s a tough golf course, and (No.) 5 is one of the toughest holes on the course. Certainly doesn’t need any lengthening for my money.”

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Durant tops Stricker, others to win Chubb Classic

By Associated PressFebruary 19, 2018, 12:19 am

NAPLES, Fla. - Joe Durant birdied the final two holes - and got some help from Steve Stricker - to win the PGA Tour Champions' Chubb Classic.

Durant shot a 5-under 67 on Sunday for a four-stroke victory over Stricker, David Toms, Lee Janzen, Billy Mayfair and Tim Petrovic.

''The stick-to-itiveness and the intestinal fortitude,'' Durant said when asked what he most proud about. ''I was nervous starting out, and I missed short putts early, but I kept grinding, kept telling myself that if I could just steady myself, hit some quality shots, the putts would start to go.''

Tied with Durant with two holes left, Stricker dropped a stroke back when Durant birdied the par-5 17th. On the par-4 18th, Stricker hit into the water and made a double bogey for a three-shot swing.

''Not my favorite pin in the world on the right side and the right-to-left wind, and I tried to hold it off and pushed it a little bit,'' Stricker said. ''He hit a great shot in there, forced me to try to go right straight at it, and I didn't pull it off.''

The 53-year-old Durant closed with a 15-footer to finish at 19-under 197 on TwinEagles' Talon course. He was safely on the 18th green when Stricker - needing birdie to tie - hit into the water.

''One of those situations where I was fortunate that I hit fist, knocked it onto the green,'' Durant said. ''So, it might have put a couple thoughts in his head anyway.''

Durant earned $240,000 for his third victory on the 50-and-over tour after winning four PGA Tour titles.

''Joe hit some great shots when he had to, put the pressure on all of us when it mattered most,'' Stricker said. ''He played great.''

The 50-year-old Stricker shot 70. He made his first start of the year on the senior tour after playing six tournaments last year - a runner-up finish in his debut along with three third-places ties.

''The par 5s killed me today,'' Stricker said. ''I eagled the first one, and then I was in great position on every other one and walked away with pars on all of them. That was really the difference.''

Durant eagled the par-5 13th - ''I felt like if I could make the 3 there, I had a shot,'' he said - and birdied the par-4 14th to take the lead at 18 under. He dropped into a tie with a bogey on the par-3 16th and Stricker's birdie on the hole.

''I was just so nervous today, and it showed on the first few holes,'' Durant said. ''I missed some short putts. My goal was to just hang in there. If you can stay around it, you never know what's going to happen the last three or four holes, and that's all I really tried to do.''

Mayfair and Petrovic shot 64, Toms had a 65, and Janzen a 68.

''Didn't really get anything going until the end of the round today,'' Toms said. ''I'm playing solid, just keep putting myself in position, maybe one day I'll get that hot round on Sunday.''

Scott McCarron was 14 under after a 68.

John Daly had a hole-in-one in a 67 to get to 13 under. He used an 8-iron on the 16th for the ace.

First-round leader Miguel Angel Jimenez was ninth at 12 under after a 72.