Woods won't read into what happened Saturday

By Doug FergusonJanuary 29, 2014, 12:36 am

SAN DIEGO – Too bad Tiger Woods can't go back in time and expand that chart of Jack Nicklaus he taped to his bedroom wall as a teenager.

One point of clarification – it was never about 18 majors.

Woods once said the chart contained only four or five items constructed in a timeline, such as when Nicklaus started playing, how long before he first broke 40 for nine holes, when he won his first U.S. Amateur and when he turned pro.

''It was just a benchmark for me growing up,'' Woods said in Australia a few years ago. ''Here's the greatest player of all time and this is what he did when he was 13, 17, 18. As a junior, you're always trying to compare yourself to, 'When did he do it?' And hopefully, I can do something a little bit better and maybe that might springboard myself into having a good career.''

Here are two more items he could have added to the list:

- Woods didn't shoot in the 80s for the first time until his 130th stroke-play tournament as a pro. Nicklaus first shot 80 in his seventh tournament. In fact, Saturday at Torrey Pines was only the fifth round in Woods' career of 79 or worse. Nicklaus had four in his rookie season alone.

- Woods went 37 majors as a pro before he finally missed a cut, in the 2006 U.S. Open at Winged Foot. Nicklaus missed his first cut in his sixth major, the 1963 U.S. Open at Brookline, when he was the defending champion.

Woods was at Oakmont for a corporate day a few months before the 2007 U.S. Open when the conversation turned to his missed cut at Winged Foot. The surprise was not that he missed the cut, but that it took nearly 10 years to happen.

Woods shrugged.

''You figure you're going to have one bad week,'' he said.

That's why it's best – for now – to heed what he said Tuesday in Dubai. He was asked about any changes he made after a 79 at Torrey Pines caused him to miss the 54-hole cut last week in the Farmers Insurance Open.

The only thing he changed was his flight itinerary to Dubai.

''I know I'm not that far off,'' Woods said. ''I just happened to have one bad day, and that happens.''

It was surprising that it happened to him, especially at Torrey Pines, where he had won eight times. It was only his fourth round over par on the South Course for that tournament. Two of those rounds were in 2011, when he was just starting to rebuild his swing. And he was in reasonable position in the tournament until his meltdown began with a shot into the pond on the par-5 18th for a double bogey.

Woods was between 3-iron and 5-wood, tried to take a little off the 5-wood, paid the price and ''it snowballed from there.'' He had seven straight holes of bogey or worse.

''Unfortunately,'' he said Tuesday, ''the longer you play the sport, the more things like that happen.''

So maybe he's catching up on lost time.

Or maybe Father Time is catching up with him.

Johnny Miller, in a book he wrote in 2004 titled, ''I Call The Shots,'' was making arguments on both sides of Woods breaking Nicklaus' record of 18 majors. One reason against Woods breaking the record was that ''competitively, he's an old 28.''

Is he now an old 38?

Woods already has gone through four knee surgeries, including a reconstruct in 2008 after he won the U.S. Open (which happens to be the 14th and last major he won).

He was right to say Tuesday that ''I wouldn't read anything into what happened Saturday at Torrey Pines.''

It was just one tournament. One round.

Remember, last year Woods missed the cut in Abu Dhabi (with help from a two-shot penalty) and then annihilated the field at Torrey Pines the next week. He couldn't finish the final round at Doral in 2012 because of soreness in his Achilles' heel, and then won his next start at Bay Hill.

But let's go back to that last knee surgery.

Woods had never finished out of the top 10 in his first tournament of the year through 2008, including six wins on three courses (La Costa, Kapalua, Torrey Pines). In the six season-openers since then, he has no wins, two top 10s and three times didn't make it to Sunday.

How much work did Woods put into his game in the 45 days between his last round at Sherwood and his opening round at Torrey Pines? Woods is the only one who can say how he prepared, and after 18 years on tour, how much he felt like he needed (or wanted) to prepare.

Miller, however, wasn't referring to Woods' health when he wrote 10 years ago that he was an ''old 28.'' His hunch was that Woods' prime had arrived early, and that ''it won't be long before the hole shrinks back to its regulation 4 1/4-inch size.''

It sure seems like a long time since Woods stood over an important putt and there was no doubt it was going in.

Woods is playing the Dubai Desert Classic this week. In six previous trips, he has won twice and has finished out of the top 5 once – that was in 2011, again when he was in the early stages of his work with Sean Foley.

If the instruction from Woods is not to read anything into what happened at Torrey, it shouldn't matter – good or bad – what happens in Dubai.

Everyone has bad days.

It just seems like Woods has more of them than he once did.

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Woods' 2018 schedule coming into focus ... or is it?

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 16, 2017, 5:46 pm

Two weeks after his successful return to competition at the Hero World Challenge, Tiger Woods’ 2018 schedule may be coming into focus.

Golfweek reported on Saturday that Woods hopes to play the Genesis Open in February according to an unidentified source with “direct knowledge of the situation.”

Woods’ agent Mark Steinberg declined to confirm the 14-time major champion would play the event and told GolfChannel.com that Woods – who underwent fusion surgery to his lower back in April – is still formulating his ’18 schedule.

Woods’ foundation is the host organization for the Genesis Open and the event supports the Tiger Woods Learning Center in Anaheim, Calif.

The Genesis Open would be Woods’ first start on the PGA Tour since he missed the cut last January at the Farmers Insurance Open.

Rose weathering delayed Indonesian Masters

By Associated PressDecember 16, 2017, 3:52 pm

JAKARTA, Indonesia - Justin Rose held a three-stroke lead after eight holes of the third round Saturday when play was suspended for the day due to bad weather at the Indonesian Masters.

Rose was 3-under on the day and led his playing partners Kiradech Aphibarnrat and Scott Vincent. The Englishman led both players by a stroke after the second round was completed Saturday morning due to weather delays on Friday.

Brandt Snedeker withdrew with apparent heat exhaustion on Friday on the 11th hole of the second round. Ranked 51st in the world, he flew to Jakarta looking to move inside the top 50 by the end of the year and ensure a spot in next year's Masters.

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Lexi (wrist) WDs from Diamond Resorts Invitational

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 15, 2017, 11:27 pm

Lexi Thompson on Friday withdrew from the Diamond Resorts Invitational, citing inflammation in her wrist. Thompson, who teamed with Tony Finau to finish tied for fourth place in last week's QBE Shootout, said she is under strict doctor's order not to hit golf balls until mid-January.

The Diamond Resorts Invitational is scheduled Jan. 12-14 at Tranquilo Golf Club in Orlando, Fla. The field for te 54-hole event includes LPGA and PGA Tour Champions players, as well as celebrities from the worlds or sports and entertainment.

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Rose leads Indonesian Masters; Snedeker WDs

By Associated PressDecember 15, 2017, 2:04 pm

JAKARTA, Indonesia - Justin Rose completed the final two holes of his second round early Saturday for a 3-under 69 and a one-stroke lead at the Indonesian Masters.

Rose, who had a first-round 62, was among a quarter of the field forced off the Royale Jakarta Golf Club course after weather delays on Friday.

The Englishman, who bogeyed his last hole, had a two-round total of 13-under 131.

Kiradech Aphibarnrat, who completed his 64 on Friday, was in second place.

Brandt Snedeker withdrew with apparent heat exhaustion on Friday on the 11th hole of the second round. Ranked 51st in the world, he flew to Jakarta looking to move inside the top 50 by the end of the year and ensure a spot in next year's Masters. He has been affected by a rib-sternum injury for most of the season.