LPGA, European Tour joining forces to help LET

By Randall MellAugust 20, 2017, 12:02 am

WEST DES MOINES, Iowa – The news emerging from back rooms at this Solheim Cup is potentially doubly good for the struggling Ladies European Tour.

LPGA commissioner Mike Whan told GolfChannel.com that he is seriously interested in “helping” the LET and has already initiated discussions, with the tours coming together formally for the first time at the Aberdeen Asset Scottish Ladies Open three weeks ago when Whan met with LET board members.

Whan and his staff agreed to formulate a plan to present to LET board members before the year’s end in what could potentially bring the LET under the LPGA’s umbrella, though Whan said no specific plan is being worked through yet and he’s open to creative options.

The news gets better because the LPGA isn’t alone in wanting to come to the LET’s aid.

Whan told GolfChannel.com that the men’s European Tour is also stepping forward to join in discussions.

What makes this doubly good news is not that the LPGA and European Tour will make competing presentations. It’s that Whan and European Tour CEO Keith Pelley are coming together to formulate a joint plan.

“I have talked to Keith, and we both agreed that a bunch of different versions of how we could help as second or third parties is not helpful to anybody,” Whan said. “So, we are working together, Keith and I, to provide a suggestion as to what we think we could do together. “We are trying to create one vision.”

The LET is enduring hard times, with some members fearing the tour’s collapse with seven events having been canceled this season. The LET’s schedule has been pared to just 15 events, down 11 events from six years ago. Though it’s almost September, the LET has staged just six events this year, beyond major championships.

At the Ricoh Women’s British Open two weeks ago, respected European veteran Catriona Matthew called for a change in LET leadership. A week later, LET CEO Ivan Khodabakhsh was ousted, with the LET’s board chairman, Mark Lichtenhein, taking over day-to-day duties.

Whan said the health of the LET is important to him beyond that tour’s joint ownership of the Solheim Cup, which is being played this week. Whan says the tour is important to the continuing growth of women’s golf.

“I would be lying if I said I was concerned about the Solheim Cup,” Whan said. “The Solheim Cup is going to be fine, but I do want to make sure my partner in the Solheim Cup is as healthy as they can be.”

Whan was encouraged by the LPGA’s first meeting with LET board members.

“I was enthusiastic about our first chat,” Whan said. “There was clearly an interest from them in wanting us to tell them more.

“I don’t really have a timeline for this. I do hope that before the end of the year we can sit down with them and say, `Here is the way we see it. Is this something you think we can do together?’”

The LPGA and LET have a partnership beyond the Solheim Cup. They also co-sanction the Ladies Scottish Open, the Ricoh Women’s British Open and the Evian Championship.

Whan wasn’t prepared to lay out specifics of what kind of plan may be presented to the LET.

“I’m typically a guy who will start an idea, and if I surround myself with the right people, they will make my idea better,” Whan said. “I definitely have some ideas, but I don’t know if they are right. I may end up with 10 ideas, maybe four are right, but somebody has to tell me which four.”

Whan did say he would not mind seeing an agreement create some sort of bridge for LET members wanting to play their way on to the LPGA, though he did not detail any desire to insist upon turning the LET into some kind of satellite tour.

“But I really do believe, if we are working together, it would make sense to me that players over the course of a season could qualify for the LPGA, but I’m not hung up on that,” he said.

Whan said he doesn’t see the LPGA as a “U.S. tour,” but as a global tour. He said any LET proposal he supports would have a common theme, and it relates to what he sees as his primary mission as LPGA commissioner.

“The real question ought to be, `How can we provide members of the Ladies European Tour the most playing opportunities, the most business opportunities, the most opportunities to be the best golfers in the world,’” Whan said. “When you start with that premise, decisions become a lot easier.”

Whan has proven himself capable in hard times. The LPGA was floundering in hard economic times when he took over in 2010, with the tour shrinking to just 23 events with $40 million in total prize money in 2011. Whan rebuilt the tour to where this year’s schedule features 34 events with more than $67 million in total prize money.

Whan is pleased the men’s European Tour wants to partner.

“I am excited to know Keith is willing to pull on the rope with us and with the LET to get to the same finish line,” Whan said.

Happy Thanksgiving: Biggest turkeys of 2017

By Grill Room TeamNovember 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

Thanksgiving brings us golf's biggest turkeys of the year. Donald Trump, Grayson Murray and a certain (now-former) tournament director headline the list. Click here or on the image below to check out all the turkeys.

Tributes pour in for legendary caddie Sheridan

By Randall MellNovember 23, 2017, 2:54 pm

Tributes are pouring in as golf celebrates the life of Greg Sheridan after receiving news of his passing.

Sheridan, a long-time LPGA caddie who worked for some of the game’s all-time greats, including Kathy Whitworth and Beth Daniel, died Wednesday in Indian Rocks Beach, Fla., at 63. He was diagnosed in July 2016 with brain and lung cancer.

Sheridan worked the last dozen years or so with Natalie Gulbis, who expressed her grief in an Instagram post on Wednesday:

“Greg…I miss you so much already and it hasn’t even been a day. 15+ seasons traveling the world you carried me & my bag through the highs and lows of golf and life. You were so much more than my teammate on the course…Thank you.”

Sheridan was on Whitworth’s bag for the last of her LPGA-record 88 titles.

“When I first came on tour, I would try to find out how many times Greg won,” Gulbis told Golfweek. “It’s a crazy number, like 50.”

Matthew Galloway, a caddie and friend to Sheridan, summed up Sheridan’s impressive reach after caddying with him one year at the LPGA Founders Cup, where the game’s pioneers are honored.

“Best Greg story,” Galloway tweeted on Thanksgiving morning, “coming up 18 at PHX all the founders were in their chairs. Greg goes, `Yep, caddied for her, her and her.’ Legend.”

In a first-person column for Golf Magazine last year, Gulbis focused on Sheridan while writing about the special bond between players and caddies. She wrote that she won the “looper lottery” when she first hired Sheridan in ’04.

“Greg and I have traveled the world, and today he is like family,” Gulbis wrote. “Sometimes, he’s a psychologist. Last year, my mom got sick and it was a distraction, but he was great. When I used to have boyfriend issues and breakup issues, he was my confidant. In a world where caddies sometimes spill secrets, Greg has kept a respectful silence, and I can’t thank him enough for that. He’s an extension of me.”

Four months after Gulbis wrote the column, Sheridan was diagnosed with cancer.

“The LPGA family is saddened to hear of the loss of long-time tour caddie, Greg Sheridan,” the LPGA tweeted. “Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and players he walked with down the fairways. #RIP.”

Dean Herden was among the legion of caddies saddened by the news.

“Greg was a great guy who I respected a lot and taught me some great things over the years,” Herden texted to GolfChannel.com.

Here are some of heartfelt messages that are rolling across Twitter:

Retired LPGA great Annika Sorenstam:

LPGA commissioner Mike Whan in a retweet of Gulbis:

Golf Channel reporter and former tour player Jerry Foltz:

Christina Kim:

LPGA caddie Shaun Clews:

LPGA caddie Jonny Scott:

LPGA caddie Kevin Casas:

LPGA pro Jennie Lee:

Fitzpatrick one back in 2018 Euro Tour opener

By Associated PressNovember 23, 2017, 1:37 pm

HONG KONG – S.S.P. Chawrasia had six birdies and a bogey Thursday for a 5-under 65 and a one-stroke lead at the Hong Kong Open, the first event of the 2018 European Tour season.

Playing in sunny but breezy conditions at the Hong Kong Golf Club, the greens had the players struggling to gauge the approach.

''Very tough conditions today,'' Chawrasia said. ''It's very firm greens, to be honest. I'm just trying to hit the second shot on the green and trying to make it like a two-putt.''


Full-field scores from the UBS Hong Kong Open


Shubhankar Sharma and Matthew Fitzpatrick (both 66) were one shot behind, while seven others were tied for fourth a further stroke behind.

''Hit it great tee to green,'' Fitzpatrick said. ''I think I had like seven or eight chances inside 15 feet, and on a day like today when it's so windy and such a tough golf course, with how tight it is, yeah, it was a good day.''

Justin Rose, who won the title in 2015, shot was 2 under with five birdies and three bogeys.

''I think the course played a couple shots harder than it typically does,'' Rose said. ''I like this course. I think it offers plenty of birdie opportunities.''

Masters champion Sergio GarciaRafa Cabrera Bello and defending champion Sam Brazel (69) were in a group of 16 at 1 under.

Day, Spieth chasing Davis after Day 1 of Aussie Open

By Jason CrookNovember 23, 2017, 6:50 am

The PGA Tour is off this week but a couple of the circuit’s biggest stars – Jordan Spieth and Jason Day – are headlining the Emirates Australian Open, the first event in The Open Qualifying Series for the 2018 Open at Carnoustie. Here's how things look after the opening round, where Cameron Davis has opened up a two-shot lead:

Leaderboard: Davis (-8), Taylor MacDonald (-6), Nick Cullen (-5), Day (-5), Brian Campbell (-4), Lucas Herbert (-4), Stephen Leaney (-4), Anthony Quayle (-4)

What it means: Spieth has won this event three of the last four years, including last year, but he got off to a rocky start on Thursday. Playing in the windy afternoon wave, the world No. 2 bogeyed his first two holes but rebounded with birdies on Nos. 4 and 5. It was more of the same the rest of the way as the 24-year-old carded three more bogeys and four birdies, getting into the clubhouse with a 1-under 70. While it certainly wasn't the start he was hoping for, Spieth didn't shoot himself out of the tournament with 54 holes left to play, he has plenty of time to claw his way up the leaderboard.


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Round of the day: With Round 1 in the books, the solo leader, Davis, is the easy pick here. The 22-year-old Aussie who turned pro last year, came out of the gates on fire, birdieing six of his first seven holes, including four in a row on Nos. 4 through 7. He did drop a shot on the ninth hole to go out in 30 but rebounded with three more birdies on the back to card a 8-under 63. Davis, who was born in Sydney and played this year on the Mackenzie Tour in Canada. He will attempt to get his Web.com Tour card next month during qualifying in Arizona.

Best of the rest: Making his first start in his home country in four years, Day started on the 10th hole at The Australian Golf Club and made four birdies to one bogey on the back side before adding four more circles after making the turn. Unfortunately for the 30-year-old, he also added an ugly double-bogey 6 on the par-4 eighth hole and had to settle for a 5-under 66, good enough to sit T-3. Day, who has dropped to No. 12 in the world rankings, is looking for his first win on any tour since the 2016 Players Championship.

Main storyline heading into Friday: Can the upstart 22-year-old Davis hold off the star power chasing him or will he fold to the pressure of major champions in his rearview mirror? Day (afternoon) and Spieth (morning) are once again on opposite ends of the draw on Friday as they try to improve their position before the weekend.

Shot of the day: It’s tough to beat an ace in this category, and we had one of those on Thursday from Australian Brad Shilton. Shilton’s hole-in-one on the par-3, 188-yard 11th hole came with a special prize, a $16k watch.

Quote of the day: “Just two bad holes. Pretty much just two bad swings for the day,” – Day, after his 66 on Thursday.