First Stage PGA Tour Q-School Santee Calif - Carlton Oaks CC

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 27, 2010, 11:14 pm
The top 23 and ties advanced to the second round of PGA Tour Q-school.
 Pos PlayerScoring To ParRoundsTotal
TotalThruCurrent1234
Full Leaderboard
1Oscar Serna  Mexico-11F-474676868277
2Peter Campbell  Encinitas, CA-10F-470716968278
T3David McDaniel  Tucson, AZ-7FE71677172281
T3Byron Smith  Palm Desert, CA-7F+272676874281
T5Chris Satterlee  Phoenix, AZ-6F-371707269282
T5Samuel Cyr  San Diego, CA-6F-173657371282
T5In-Hoi Hur  South Korea-6F-171716971282
T8Adam Hadwin  Canada-5F-269727270283
T8Lucas Lee  Torrance, CA-5F-171687371283
T8Joseph Bramlett  Saratoga, CA-5F-174677171283
T11Jason Kang  Fullerton, CA-4F-368767169284
T11Alex Aragon  San Diego, CA-4F-371737169284
T13Blake Parks  Phoenix, AZ-3F-272707370285
T13Kent Eger  Scottsdale, AZ-3F-174707071285
T13Bio Kim  South Korea-3FE70707372285
T13Kevin Larsen  Santa Barbara, CA-3FE69737172285
T17Justin Ahasic  Sugar Grove, IL-2F-370717669286
T17Tommy Barber  Burbank, CA-2F-372727369286
T17Kevin Kim  Rancho Santa Fe, CA-2F-274697370286
T17Mike Ruiz  Las Vegas, NV-2F-173717171286
T17Danny Wax  Pacific Palisades, CA-2F-172707371286
T17Knut Borsheim  Tempe, AZ-2FE71737072286
T17Danny Lee  Irving, TX-2F+268697574286
T17Kendall Critchfield  Tempe, AZ-2F+568717077286
T25Josh Habig  San Diego, CA-1F-273697570287
T25Phil Telliard  Riverside, CA-1F-373747169287
T25Nick Geyer  Albuquerque, NM-1F-274717270287
T25Blake Trimble  Rancho Santa Fe, CA-1F *-674757266287
T25David Dragoo  Scottsdale, AZ-1F+173707173287
T30Andrew Perez  Oxnard, CAEF-175717171288
T30Andrew Parr  CanadaEF *-474737368288
T30Mike Mezei  San Antonio, TXEF+273726974288
T30Drew Stoltz  Scottsdale, AZEF+374677275288
T30Mike Lavery  Mission Viejo, CAEF+470707276288
T35Rob Grube  Palo Alto, CA+1F *-169747571289
T35Brady Schnell  Gilbert, AZ+1FE70757272289
T35Todd Demsey  Scottsdale, AZ+1F+173766773289
T35Jae An  Peoria, AZ+1F+272727174289
T35Jesse Mueller  Mesa, AZ+1F+469717376289
40Jason Scrivener  Australia+2F+170757273290
T41Wes Heffernan  Canada+3F *E74737272291
T41Jarin Todd  Woodinville, WA+3F+276707174291
T43Jeremy Gearhart  Atascadero, CA+4F *+270717774292
T43Eric Meichtry  Murrieta, CA+4F *-175767071292
T43Bret Guetz  Scottsdale, AZ+4F *-174777071292
T43Brady Swedberg  Alexandria, MN+4F *-377727469292
T43Blaine Staggs  San Diego, CA+4F *-475757468292
T43David Bradshaw  Harpers Ferry, WV+4F+770737079292
49Vincent Johnson  Portland, OR+5F *E70747772293
T50Andrew Giuliani  New York, NY+6F *+170737873294
T50Kenny Ebalo  Las Vegas, NV+6F *E77747172294
T50Ken Tanigawa  Anthem, AZ+6F *-276727670294
T53Michael Baird  Castle Rock, CO+7F *+172747673295
T53David Hahn  Dana Point, CA+7F *E74737672295
T55Jonathan Sauer  St. Cloud, MN+8F *+275727574296
T55Daniel Licursi  Chandler, AZ+8F *+274757374296
T55Brett Paquet  Gilbert, AZ+8F *E77757272296
T58Nick Jones  Los Angeles, CA+9F *+276747374297
T58Darren Fletcher  Cave Creek, AZ+9F *E76757472297
T60Michael Choi  Australia+10F *+573737577298
T60Doug Batty  Beverly Hills, CA+10F *+474747476298
T60Ryan Thornberry  Ceres, CA+10F *+375717775298
T60Dale Clarke  New Zealand+10F *E73767772298
64Tye Alexander  Los Angeles, CA+11F *+776727279299
T65Corey Prugh  Spokane, WA+12F *+675747378300
T65Dong Hong  Los Angeles, CA+12F *+374727975300
T65Patrick Duffy  Appleton, WI+12F *+373747875300
T68Kyle Morris  Scottsdale, AZ+13F *+674727778301
T68Trevor Hiebing  La Quinta, CA+13F *+672757678301
T68Matt Johnston  Canada+13F *+374757775301
71Christian Green  Sisters, OR+14F *+276767674302
72Jumbo Kim  Las Vegas, NV+16F *+1074727682304
73Greg McAuley  Canada+19F *+677777578307
74Carl Smith  Laguna Beach, CA+20F *+677767778308
75Andrew Johnson  Mesa, AZ+24F *+281787974312
--------------------------------------------------------------------
WDAdam Porzak  Poway, CA+5  * 777272 221
WDBrandon Askew  Scottsdale, AZ+12  * 777675 228
Getty Images

Monty grabs lead entering final round in season-opener

By Associated PressJanuary 20, 2018, 4:00 am

KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii – Colin Montgomerie shot a second straight 7-under 65 to take a two-shot lead into the final round of the Mitsubishi Electric Championship, the season opener on the PGA Tour Champions.

The 54-year-old Scot, a six-time winner on the over-50 tour, didn't miss a fairway on Friday and made five birdies on the back nine to reach 14 under at Hualalai.

Montgomerie has made 17 birdies through 36 holes and said he will have to continue cashing in on his opportunities.

''We know that I've got to score something similar to what I've done – 66, 67, something like that, at least,'' Montgomerie said. ''You know the competition out here is so strong that if you do play away from the pins, you'll get run over. It's tough, but hey, it's great.''


Full-field scores from the Mitsubishi Electric Championship


First-round co-leaders Gene Sauers and Jerry Kelly each shot 68 and were 12 under.

''I hit the ball really well. You know, all the putts that dropped yesterday didn't drop today,'' Kelly said. ''I was just short and burning edges. It was good putting again. They just didn't go in.''

David Toms was three shots back after a 66. Woody Austin, Mark Calcavecchia and Doug Garwood each shot 67 and were another shot behind.

Bernhard Langer, defending the first of his seven 2017 titles, was six shots back after a 67.

The limited-field tournament on Hawaii's Big Island includes last season's winners, past champions of the event, major champions and Hall of Famers.

''We've enjoyed ourselves thoroughly here,'' Montgomerie said. ''It's just a dramatic spot, isn't it? If you don't like this, well, I'm sorry, take a good look in the mirror, you know?''

Getty Images

The missing link: Advice from successful tour pros

By Phil BlackmarJanuary 20, 2018, 1:24 am

Today’s topic is significant in that it underscores the direction golf is headed, a direction that has me a little concerned.

Now, more than ever, it has become the norm for PGA Tour players to put together a team to assist in all aspects of their career. These teams can typically include the player’s swing coach, mental coach, manager, workout specialist, dietician, physical therapist, short-game guru, doctor, accountant, nanny and wife. Though it often concerns me the player may be missing out when others are making decisions for them, that is not the topic.

I want to talk about what most players seem to be inexplicably leaving off their teams.

One of the things that separates great players from the rest of the pack – other than talent – is the great player’s ability to routinely stay comfortable and play with focus and clarity in all situations. Though innate to many, this skill is trainable and can be learned. Don’t get too excited, the details of such a plan are too long and more suited for a book than the short confines of this article.

So, if that aspect of the game is so important, where is the representative on the player’s team who has stood on the 18th tee with everything on the line? Where is the representative on the team who has experienced, over and over, what the player will be experiencing? In other words, where is the successful former tour player on the team?

You look to tennis and many players have such a person on their team. These teacher/mentors include the likes of Boris Becker, Ivan Lendl, Jimmy Connors and Brad Gilbert. Why is it not the norm in golf?

Sure, a few players have sought out the advice of Jack Nicklaus, but he’s not part of a team. The teaching ranks also include some former players like Butch Harmon and a few others. But how many teams include a player who has contended in a major, let alone won one or more?

I’m not here to argue the value and knowledge of all the other coaches who make up a player’s team. But how can the value of a successful tour professional be overlooked? If I’m going to ask someone what I should do in various situations on the course, I would prefer to include the experienced knowledge of players who have been there themselves.

This leads me to the second part of today’s message. Is there a need for the professional players to mix with professional teachers to deliver the best and most comprehensive teaching philosophy to average players? I feel there is.

Most lessons are concerned with changing the student’s swing. Often, this is done with little regard for how it feels to the student because the teacher believes the information is correct and more important than the “feels” of the student. “Stick with it until it’s comfortable” is often the message. This directive methodology was put on Twitter for public consumption a short time back:

On the other hand, the professional player is an expert at making a score and understands the intangible side of the game. The intangible side says: “Mechanics cannot stand alone in making a good player.” The intangible side understands “people feel things differently”; ask Jim Furyk to swing like Dustin Johnson, or vice versa. This means something that looks good to us may not feel right to someone else.

The intangible side lets us know that mechanics and feels must walk together in order for the player to succeed. From Ben Hogan’s book:

“What I have learned I have learned by laborious trial and error, watching a good player do something that looked right to me, stumbling across something that felt right to me, experimenting with that something to see if it helped or hindered, adopting it if it helped, refining it sometimes, discarding it if it didn’t help, sometimes discarding it later if it proved undependable in competition, experimenting continually with new ideas and old ideas and all manner of variations until I arrived at a set of fundamentals that appeared to me to be right because they accomplished a very definite purpose, a set of fundamentals which proved to me they were right because they stood up and produced under all kinds of pressure.”

Hogan beautifully described the learning process that could develop the swings of great players like DJ, Furyk, Lee Trevino, Jordan Spieth, Nicklaus, etc.

Bob Toski is still teaching. Steve Elkington is helping to bring us the insight of Jackie Burke. Hal Sutton has a beautiful teaching facility outside of Houston. And so on. Just like mechanics and feels, it’s not either-or – the best message comes from both teachers and players.

Lately, it seems the scale has swung more to one side; let us not forget the value of insights brought to us by the players who have best mastered the game.

Getty Images

Woods, Rahm, Rickie, J-Day headline Torrey field

By Golf Channel DigitalJanuary 20, 2018, 12:47 am

Tiger Woods is set to make his 2018 debut.

Woods is still part of the final field list for next week’s Farmers Insurance Open, the headliner of a tournament that includes defending champion Jon Rahm, Hideki Matsuyama, Justin Rose, Rickie Fowler, Phil Mickelson and Jason Day.

In all, 12 of the top 26 players in the world are teeing it up at Torrey Pines.

Though Woods has won eight times at Torrey Pines, he hasn’t broken 71 in his past seven rounds there and hasn’t played all four rounds since 2013, when he won. Last year he missed the cut after rounds of 76-72, then lasted just one round in Dubai before he withdrew with back spasms.

After a fourth back surgery, Woods didn’t return to competition until last month’s Hero World Challenge, where he tied for ninth. 

Woods has committed to play both the Farmers Insurance Open and next month's Genesis Open at Riviera, which benefits his foundation. 

Getty Images

Even on 'off' day, Rahm shoots 67 at CareerBuilder

By Ryan LavnerJanuary 20, 2018, 12:36 am

Jon Rahm didn’t strike the ball as purely Friday as he did during his opening round at the CareerBuilder Challenge.

He still managed a 5-under 67 that put him just one shot off the lead heading into the weekend.

“I expected myself to go to the range (this morning) and keep flushing everything like I did yesterday,” said Rahm, who shot a career-low 62 at La Quinta on Thursday. “Everything was just a little bit off. It was just one of those days.”


Full-field scores from the Career Builder Challenge

CareerBuilder Challenge: Articles, photos and videos


After going bogey-free on Thursday, Rahm mixed four birdies and two bogeys over his opening six holes. He managed to settle down around the turn, then made two birdies on his final three holes to move within one shot of Andrew Landry (65).

Rahm has missed only five greens through two rounds and sits at 15-under 129. 

The 23-year-old Spaniard won in Dubai to end the year and opened 2018 with a runner-up finish at the Sentry Tournament of Champions. He needs a top-6 finish or better this week to supplant Jordan Spieth as the No. 2 player in the world.