Burks Protest Draws Small Crowd

By Golf Channel NewsroomApril 12, 2003, 4:00 pm
AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) -- Martha Burk and her small group of supporters brought their fight against Augusta National to the Masters on Saturday, saying the millionaires in the elite club were terrified that the protest would force them to admit a woman member.
 
Burk railed against local officials for isolating the protest in a weedy lot a half-mile from the front gates of the club. That allowed most of the golfers, fans and green jacket-wearing club members to walk inside without seeing the demonstrators.
 
'Don't you find it a little ironic that we can stand on the front steps of the Supreme Court and can march in groups larger than four in front of the White House, but we can't get to the front gates of Augusta National Inc.?' Burk said. 'What do you think these boys are afraid of?'
 
Burk, head of the National Council of Women's Organizations, and her supporters say the club is guilty of sex discrimination.
 
Saturday's protest, which began as the rain-delayed tournament was completing its second round, was much smaller than the 200 demonstrators Burk had predicted. There were about 10 speakers onstage -- including U.S. Rep. Carolyn B. Maloney, D-N.Y. -- and about 30 supporters. They were outnumbered by police officers sent to keep the peace in a nearly empty field set aside for demonstrations.
 
Yet Burk's supporters said they had thousands of people behind them.
 
'This is not just one woman battling Hootie,' said 25-year-old Jessica Terlikowskia, referring to the Augusta National chairman, Hootie Johnson. 'It's definitely to show that she's not alone, and that many people recognize that for women to reach full equality, we have to have access to all places.'
 
Terlikowskia, a full-time activist from Washington, put up a banner targeting corporations with executives in the club. 'Women Play/CEOs Play,' it said, with the logos of Ford, General Electric, Citigroup, Coors, Coca-Cola and Viacom.
 
Johnson hasn't budged in defending the male-only membership, saying the private club is no different from single-gender organizations such as the Junior League and the Boy Scouts. To free Masters sponsors from the controversy, he decided to allow the tournament to be televised without commercials, costing the club millions.
 
The demonstrators and several counter-protesters are sharing a 5.1-acre lot that Sheriff Ronald Strength set aside, to keep the one-day protest from snarling traffic. Strength approved permits for more than 900 protesters at the site, though only a fraction of that was expected.
 
He had warned that anyone protesting closer to the golf club gates would be arrested.
 
The site is just across the street from the edge of the course, but a large fence, trees and heavy brush prevents anyone inside from seeing or hearing the protest. Most fans and club members didn't even have to pass the protest site to get into the course entrances.
 
Some fans walking to the course stopped to talk to protesters and buy anti-Burk T-shirts and buttons.
 
At least 100 police cars were parked in the lot to separate the groups from each other. About half the site was designated for Burk's group and the Rev. Jesse Jackson's Rainbow/PUSH Coalition. Jackson said he would not attend.
 
The rest of the lot was broken up into sections for rival protesters. They include Todd Manzi of Tampa, Fla., Burk's self-appointed nemesis, and Joseph J. Harper of Cordele, Ga., the leader of a Ku Klux Klan splinter group.
 
Adding to the free-speech free-for-all was Dave Walker of Atlanta, a one-man pro-war rally whose baseball cap says 'Give War a Chance,' and an anti-Jackson group called Brotherhood of a New Destiny.
 
A few locals calling themselves People Against Ridiculous Protests said they were making their point by not protesting. They planted their banners -- one saying 'Look at all the RIDICULOUS people' -- and left.
 
'We just don't want to show up and add to the ridiculousness of what's going on,' said Deke Wiggins, leader of the group.
 
Several people arrived to criticize Burk for focusing so much attention on a golf club while the nation is at war.
 
'As a woman, I wouldn't waste that much money and effort to try to be part of an association that doesn't want women,' said Katie Parks, 25, of Washington.
 
Burk initially sought permission to post 24 protesters on either side of the wrought iron gate where players and club members enter the grounds, and 200 more across the street.
 
The sheriff denied her a permit to get that close, saying protesters would be a dangerous distraction to Masters fans walking and driving to the course. Burk sued, but a federal judge and an appeals court upheld Strength's decision.
 
Related Links:
  • 2003 Masters Tournament Mini-Site
  • Tournament Coverage
  • Photo Gallery
  • Augusta National Course Tour
  • The Augusta National Membership Debate: A Chronology
     
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  • Cook leads RSM Classic by three at Sea Island

    By Associated PressNovember 19, 2017, 12:28 am

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. - PGA Tour rookie Austin Cook shot a 4-under 66 on Saturday to increase his lead to three strokes in the RSM Classic.

    Cook, a shot ahead after a second-round 62, had five birdies and a bogey - his first of the week - to reach 18-under 194 with a round left at Sea Island Golf Club's Seaside Course.

    ''Putting is key right now,'' Cook said. ''Been able to make a lot of clutch putts for the pars to save no bogeys. Hitting the ball pretty much where we're looking and giving ourselves good opportunities on every hole.''

    Former University of Georgia player Chris Kirk was second after a 64.

    ''I'm really comfortable here,'' Kirk said. ''I love Sea Island. I lived here for 6 1/2 years, so I played the golf course a lot, SEC Championships and come down here for the RSM Classic. My family and I, we come down here a few other times a year as well.''

    Brian Gay was another stroke back at 14 under after a 69.

    ''I love the course,'' Gay said. ''We keep getting different wind directions so it's keeping us on our toes. Supposed to be another completely different wind direction tomorrow, so we're getting a new course every day.''


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    J.J. Spaun had a 62 to get to 13 under.

    ''I just kind of played stress-free golf out there and kept the golf ball in front of me,'' Spaun said. ''I had a lot of looks and scrambled pretty well, even though it was only a handful of times, but pretty overall pleased with how I played today.''

    Cook has made the weekend cuts in all four of his starts this season. The 26-year-old former Arkansas player earned his PGA Tour card through the Web.com Tour.

    ''I think with an extra year on the Web this past year, I really grew mentally and with my game, just kind of more confidence,'' Cook said. ''I was able to put myself in contention on the Web.com more this year than I have in the past. I think I've just, you know, learned from experiences on the Web to help me grow out here.''

    He planned to keep it simple Saturday night.

    ''I've got my parents here and my in-laws are both here as well as my wife,'' Cook said. ''Go home and just have a good home-cooked meal and just kind of enjoy the time and embrace the moment.''

    Kirk won the last of his four PGA Tour titles in 2015 at Colonial.

    ''It's nice to be back in contention again,'' Kirk said. ''It's been a little while for me. But I felt great out there today, I felt really comfortable, and so hopefully it will be the same way tomorrow and I'll keep my foot on the pedal and stay aggressive, try to make some birdies.''

    Park's stumble creates wide-open finale

    By Randall MellNovember 18, 2017, 11:46 pm

    NAPLES, Fla. – Sung Hyun Park didn’t turn the CME Group Tour Championship into a runaway Saturday at Tiburon Golf Club.

    She left with bloody fingernails after a brutal day failing to hold on to her spot atop the leaderboard.

    OK, they weren’t really bloody, but even the unflappable Park wasn’t immune to mounting pressure, with the Rolex world No. 1 ranking, the Rolex Player of the Year Award, the Vare Trophy for low scoring average, the CME Globe’s $1 million jackpot and the money-winning title among the prizes she knew were within reach when she teed it up.

    “It’s honestly some of the worst pressure,” Stacy Lewis said of CME week. “It’s so much pressure.  It’s just really hard to free yourself up and play golf.”

    Lewis isn’t in the mix for all those prizes this year, but the two-time Rolex Player of the Year and two-time Vare Trophy winner knows what the full weight of this week’s possibilities bring.

    “It’s almost nice to come here without all that pressure, but you want to be in that situation,” Lewis said. “It’s just really tough.”

    Park is no longer in charge at Tiburon.

    This championship is wide, wide open with a four-way tie for first place and 18 players within two shots of the lead.

    Park is one shot back after stumbling to a 3-over-par 75.

    Count Michelle Wie among the four tied for the lead after charging with a 66.

    Former world No. 1 Ariya Jutanugarn (67), Suzann Pettersen (69) and Kim Kaufman (64) are also atop the leaderboard.

    Kaufman was the story of the day, getting herself in contention with a sizzling round just two weeks after being diagnosed with mononucleosis.

    Park is in a seven-way tie for fifth place just one shot back.


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    Lexi Thompson (69) is in that mix a shot back, as is Lewis (67), who is seeking to add a second title this year to her emotional win for Houston hurricane relief.

    For Wie, winning the tournament will be reward enough, given how her strong rebound this year seemed derailed in September by an emergency appendectomy. She was out for six weeks.

    Before the surgery, Wie fought her way back from two of the most disappointing years of her career, with six finishes of T-4 or better this season. She returned to the tour on the Asian swing in October.

    “I gained a lot of confidence this year,” Wie said. “I had a really tough year last year, the last couple years. Just really feeling like my old self. Really feeling comfortable out there and having fun. That’s when I play my best.”

    All the subplots make Sunday so much more complicated for Park and Thompson, who are best positioned for a giant haul of hardware.

    They have the most to gain in the final round.

    Park has already clinched the Rolex Rookie of the Year Award, but she can add the Rolex Player of the Year title, joining Nancy Lopez as the only players in LPGA history to win both those awards in the same season. Lopez did it in 1978.

    A fifth place finish or better could give Park the Player of the Year Award outright, depending what others do.

    “There are a lot of top players right now at the top of the leaderboard,” Park said. “Keeping my focus will be key.”

    Thompson can still take home the Rolex Player of the Year Award, the Vare Trophy and the CME Globe jackpot. She needs to win the tournament Sunday to win Player of the Year.

    Like Park, Thompson is trying not to think about it all of that.

    “I treat every tournament the same,” Thompson said. “I go into it wanting to win. I’m not really thinking about anything else.”

    The Vare Trophy for low scoring average is Thompson’s to lose.

    Park has to finish nine shots ahead of Thompson on Sunday to have a shot at the trophy, and they are tied at 9-under overall.

    The money-winning title is Park’s to lose. So Yeon Ryu has to win the tournament Sunday to have a chance to wrestle the title from Park, but Ryu has to pass 31 players to do so.

    The CME Globe’s $1 million jackpot remains more up for grabs, with Thompson and Park best positioned to win it, though Jutanugarn is poised to pounce if both stumble. A lot is still possible in the race for the jackpot.

    The pressure will be turned way up on the first tee Sunday.

    “There is always that little bit of adrenaline,” Thompson said. “You just have to tame it and control it.”

    Simpson WDs from RSM, tweets his father is ill

    By Rex HoggardNovember 18, 2017, 10:45 pm

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – Following rounds of 67-68, Webb Simpson was in 12th place entering the weekend at the RSM Classic before he withdrew prior to Saturday’s third round.

    On Saturday afternoon, Simpson tweeted that he withdrew due to an illness in his family.

    “Thanks to [Davis Love III] for being such a great tournament host. I [withdrew] due to my dad being sick and living his last days,” Simpson posted on Twitter on Saturday afternoon.


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    Simpson’s father, Sam, caddied for his son during amateur events, and Webb Simpson started playing golf after following his father to the course on family vacations to North Carolina.

    “My dad is probably the kindest man I know. He’s always been the guy who knew everyone, everyone knew him, everyone wanted to be around him,” Simpson said in a 2015 interview with David Feherty. “He taught me the game. He’s always been one of those dads who loved to be active with their kids.”

    Before play began on Thursday, Luke Donald withdrew after being hospitalized with chest pain. Tests indicated the Englishman’s heart was fine and he returned home to undergo more tests.

    New old putter helps Kirk (64) jump into contention

    By Rex HoggardNovember 18, 2017, 10:43 pm

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – Chris Kirk’s ball-striking has been nearly flawless this fall. Unfortunately, the same couldn’t be said for his putting.

    In four events this season, Kirk ranks 143rd in strokes gained: putting, but his fortunes have changed this week, thanks at least in part to a return to something familiar.

    Kirk switched to an older style of putter similar to the one he used on the Web.com Tour in 2010 to earn his PGA Tour card.

    “It's nice to be back in contention again,” said Kirk, who is alone in second place, three strokes behind front-runner Austin Cook. “It's been a little while for me. But I felt great out there today, I felt really comfortable, and so hopefully it will be the same way tomorrow.”


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    Kirk is 25th in strokes gained: putting this week and has converted several crucial putts, including a 30-footer for birdie at the 17th hole on his way to a third-round 64.

    His putting is similar to 2013 when he won the RSM Classic, and his improved play on the greens has given the 32-year-old confidence going into Sunday’s final round.

    “I'll probably be relatively comfortable in that situation, and thankfully I've been there before,” Kirk said. “It's still not easy by any means, but hopefully I'll be able to group together a bunch of good shots and see what it gives me.”