Which was your favorite major of 2012?

By Jason SobelAugust 14, 2012, 5:17 pm

This year's majors are history, which leaves us only one thing to decide: Which one was your favorite? Was it Bubba Watson hitting his improbably hooked wedge to set up an overtime Masters win? Or Webb Simpson taking advantage of Jim Furyk’s late stumble in the U.S. Open? Or Ernie Els returning to major-championship relevance with his British Open victory (at Adam Scott’s expense)? Or Rory McIlroy putting on another dominating performance in the PGA Championship?

We asked our writers to pick their favorites. They were only too happy to oblige.


BY JASON SOBEL

We witnessed some pretty dramatic moments at the four major championships this year. Steady, solid Jim Furyk yanking one off the tee and eventually losing the U.S. Open. Adam Scott finishing with four consecutive bogeys to relinquish the. Open Championship to Ernie Els. Rory McIlroy once again blowing away a major field at the PGA Championship.

For my money, though, I'll always remember the 2012 majors for one thing more than any other.

It was the year some dude named Bubba won himself a green jacket.

This year's Masters Tournament was a fun-filled roller-coaster of thrills and despair. Phil Mickelson hit one of the all-time flop shots on Saturday, then flubbed one righty on Sunday. Louis Oosthuizen carded an albatross, but later lost in a playoff.

Then there's the aforementioned Bubba Watson, a big-hitting country boy who in many ways is the antithesis of the austere Augusta National membership. His hooked wedge from the trees to win on the second playoff hole was one for the ages.

And it helped the Masters lay claim to being the best major of 2012.


BY RANDALL MELL

Americans chanting Rory McIlroy’s name along the dunes on the shores of Kiawah Island will stay with us a long time. The Northern Irishman may have taken all the drama out of the PGA Championship on Sunday, but he left us a masterpiece doing so.

The victory is not quite there with Tiger Woods’ 15-shot triumph at the 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, or his 12-shot runaway at the '97 Masters. It’s not there with the unforgettable effort Jack Nicklaus gave us winning his last major at the Masters in '86, but it’s in the same wing of the museum with those works of art.

McIlroy gave us one of golf’s Rembrandts with his final-round bogey-free performance in blowing away the field by a PGA Championship-record eight shots.

Bubba Watson’s Masters victory was thrilling, Webb Simpson’s win at Olympic was classic U.S. Open survival golf, and Ernie Els’ British Open triumph after the epic collapse of Adam Scott was emotionally gripping, but McIlroy’s masterpiece will be remembered for the ruthless beauty that sets it apart as one of the game’s great major championship victories.


BY REX HOGGARD

Picking the year’s best major is akin to naming your favorite Beatles tune. 2012 has been an embarrassment of Grand Slam riches from Bubba Watson’s Masters magic act to Rory McIlroy’s PGA walk-off. Only one, however, delivered equal parts triumph and tragedy – the Open Championship.

Although Jim Furyk’s collapse and Webb Simpson’s performance at the U.S. Open certainly qualify as a complete drama, the last hour at Lytham was major pressure at its most extreme.

With the engraver’s hand poised over the claret jug and cruising along with a four-stroke advantage with four holes to play, Adam Scott closed with four consecutive bogeys. It may have lacked the theatrics of Jean Van de Velde’s Carnoustie collapse, but given the Australian’s pedigree and performance through 67 holes it was no less shocking.

It is Ernie Els’ epic charge that stands the British Open above all others, however. The South African’s final-nine 32 was epic, capped by a winding 15-footer for birdie at the last.

Just four months earlier the South African, a decade removed from his last major victory and driven to extremes (the long putter) in an attempt to rediscover his game, was scrambling just to play in the majors.

It was, with apologies to Scott, the perfect finish. The perfect major.


BY RYAN LAVNER

The best major of 2012? Certainly, it has to be the one with the best finish. (Sorry, Ernie.) Deep in the pine straw, on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff, at the most iconic course in the U.S., Bubba Watson played a seemingly unfathomable, wickedly curving wedge from the trees on the 10th hole, a shot that nestled to within 15 feet of the cup and set up the win at the Masters.

Spine-tingling stuff.

Average golfers either whiff attempting that shot or, worse, hit themselves in the shin. Few Tour players even have the capacity to imagine that shot, let alone the audacity to pull it off at that critical juncture. And, come on, how good a story was that? A guy with awesome power and a homemade swing . . . and a newly adopted baby back home in Florida . . . and his mom waiting by the edge of the green . . . and his alma mater, the University of Georgia, only two hours away, so the delirious Bulldogs fans barked and cheered his name . . . and all of this less than two years after Bubba’s father passed away, the emotions from which were still quite raw.

The 2013 Masters, and beyond, will have a hard time topping that.

Day (68) just one back at Australian Open

By Nick MentaNovember 24, 2017, 6:40 am

Jason Day posted a second-round 68 to move himself just one off the lead held by Lucas Herbert through two rounds at the Emirates Australian Open. Here’s where things stand after 36 holes in Sydney.

Leaderboard: Herbert (-9), Day (-8), Cameron Davis (-7), Anthony Quayle (-6), Matt Jones (-4), Cameron Smith (-4), Nick Cullen (-4), Richard Green (-4)

What it means: Day is in search of his first worldwide victory of 2017. The former world No. 1 last visited the winner’s circle in May 2016, when he won The Players at TPC Sawgrass. A win this week would close out a difficult year for the Aussie who struggled with his game while also helping his mother in her battle with cancer. Day’s last victory on his native soil came in 2013, when he partnered with Adam Scott to win the World Cup of Golf for Australia at Royal Melbourne.


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Round of the day: Herbert followed an opening 67 with a round of 66 to vault himself into the lead at The Australian Golf Club. He made six birdies, including four on his second nine, against a lone bogey to take the outright lead. The 22-year-old, who held the lead at this event last year and captured low-amateur honors in 2014, is coming off a runner-up finish at the NSW Open Championship, which boosted him from 714th to 429th in the Official World Golf Ranking. His 5-under score was matched by Dale Brandt-Richards and Josh Cabban.

Best of the rest: Matt Jones, who won this event over Jordan Spieth and Adam Scott two years ago, turned in 4-under 67. Jones is best known to American audiences for his playoff victory at the 2014 Shell Houston Open and for holding the 36-hole lead at the 2015 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, which was eventually won by Day. Jones will start the weekend five shots off the lead, at 4 under par.

Biggest disappointment: Spieth has a lot of work to do this weekend if he expects to be in the title picture for the fourth year in a row. Rounds of 70-71 have him eight shots behind the lead held by Herbert. Spieth made a birdie and a bogey on each side Friday to turn in level par. The reigning champion golfer of the year has finished first, second and first at this event over the last three years.

Storyline to watch this weekend: The Australian Open is the first event of the 2018 Open Qualifying Series. The leading three players who finish in the top 10 and who are not otherwise exempt will receive invites into next summer’s Open Championship at Carnoustie.

Ogilvy urges distance rollback of ball

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 8:49 pm

Add Geoff Ogilvy to the chorus of voices calling for a distance rollback of the golf ball.

In an interview before the start of the Emirates Australian Open, Ogilvy said a "time-out" is needed for governing bodies to deal with the issue.

"It's complete nonsense," he said, according to an Australian website. "In my career, it’s gone from 300 yards was a massive hit to you’re a shorter hitter on tour now, legitimately short. It’s changed the way we play great golf courses and that is the crime. It isn’t that the ball goes 400, that’s neither here nor there. It’s the fact the ball going 400 doesn’t makes Augusta work properly, it functions completely wrong.’’


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Ogilvy used an example from American baseball to help get his point across to an Australian audience.

“Major League Baseball in America, they use wooden bats, and everywhere else in baseball they use aluminium bats,’’ he said. “And when the major leaguers use aluminium bats they don’t even have to touch it and it completely destroys their stadiums. It’s just comedy.

“That’s kind of what’s happened to us at least with the drivers of these big hitters; We’ve completely outgrown the stadiums. So do you rebuild every stadium in the world? That’s expensive. Or make the ball go shorter? It seems relatively simple from that perspective.’’

Ogilvy, an Australian who won the 2006 U.S. Open, said he believes there will be a rollback, but admitted it would be a "challenge" for manufacturers to produce a ball that flies shorter for pros but does not lose distance when struck by recreational players.

The golf world celebrates Thanksgiving

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 6:01 pm

Here's a look, through social media, at how the golf world celebrates Thanksgiving.

Lexi Thompson:

Baking time!!

A post shared by Lexi Thompson (@lexi) on

David Feherty:

Jack Nicklaus:

GC Tiger Tracker:

Steve Stricker:

Golf Channel:

Frank Nobilo:

Ian Poulter:

Tyrone Van Aswegen:

Happy Thanksgiving: Biggest turkeys of 2017

By Grill Room TeamNovember 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

Thanksgiving brings us golf's biggest turkeys of the year. Donald Trump, Grayson Murray and a certain (now-former) tournament director headline the list. Click here or on the image below to check out all the turkeys.