On Ryder Cup Friday, nothing like No. 1 tee

By Ryan LavnerSeptember 28, 2012, 2:15 pm

MEDINAH, Ill. – The first tee on Ryder Cup Friday is one of the most pressurized scenes in all of sports. It’s Game 7 of the World Series, a do-or-die game in the NBA Finals, the final moments of the Super Bowl . . . all on a swath of closely mown grass some 10 yards wide.

Who cares that so many European players now live in the U.S., that they have become fixtures on the PGA Tour? These biennial matches haven’t lost any of their intensity, at least not among fans. They still wrapped themselves in their country’s flags like blankets. They stomped and sang songs even with the competitors still warming up on the range, nowhere in sight.

They arrived early, too. It was 6:39 a.m. local time when this correspondent arrived. The air smelled of hot coffee, hamburgers were already on the grill, and fans jammed eight rows deep along the sides of the first tee. Everyone could see their breath. It's 51 degrees.

The setup around No. 1 tee is such that players must walk from the practice green over scaffolding to arrive at the tee – gladiators entering their arena, only this venue had lush green grass, bunkers and a MetLife blimp hovering overhead.

It’s 6:58. The Euros’ “Ole, ole, ole!” chant suddenly was met by screams of “U-S-A!” – a minute-long clash of vibrant and impassioned noise, like a fight between teenaged siblings.

It wouldn’t be long before U.S. assistant captains Jeff Sluman and Fred Couples arrived on the first tee, sparking another “U-S-A!” chant. Freddie lifted both arms in exultation, then was reduced to a gray-haired, cool-kid mascot, clapping and flipping hats to the fans.

It’s 7:15. Team Europe – well, a few of the team members who weren’t playing (Martin Kaymer, Nicolas Colsaerts) on Friday morning – made their way to the back of the first tee, for moral support. Not far behind was U.S. captain Davis Love III, who extended his left fist into the air. The crowd roared.

Soon, Love and the rest of the assistant captains gathered on the teeing ground for a group picture – this year’s Christmas card.

The first player in the first group to arrive was Jim Furyk, and he wore a snow cap. Walking toward the tee, he held his left hand to his ear – I can’t hear you! His partner, Brandt Snedeker, a Ryder Cup rookie, was next, and he clapped and high-fived and smiled wide – hey, the guy just won $11.4 mill.

It’s 7:19. Furyk walked over and kissed his wife, Tabitha, and Sneds smooched his bride, too. Photogs rushed to grab their cameras.

As Europe’s Graeme McDowell was introduced, the Golf Gods hit the mute button on the universal remote – the crowd fell silent, immediately. And the first tee shot of the 39th Ryder Cup sailed way left, clipping a tree some 75 yards ahead, and fans scrambled to get a proper view of the ball. Furyk then pegged it, the crowd cheered, he set up right, and then overcooked it left, too. Nerves.

It’s 7:25. On the tee, Love conducted a TV interview, the equivalent of an NFL coach being asked his thoughts after the first media timeout in the first quarter. A few fans sang “Old MacDonald” as Luke Donald’s wife, Diane, slipped to the left side of the tee.

It’s 7:28. Here came Phil Mickelson and Keegan Bradley – frequent practice-round partners, gambling buddies, mentor and mentee. Lefty flashed a few thumbs-up, as is his wont, and not far behind came Sergio Garcia and hometown favorite Luke Donald. Luuuuuuuuke. They took an awkward photo – U.S. team on the left, match official in the middle, Europe on the right – that could feature the caption, “House divided!”

The moments before this star-studded match were tense, and the players exchanged pleasantries. Fortunately, a few clever fans provided the levity, chanting, “Ma-jor win-ners!” referring to this Euro duo’s oft-discussed oh-fer in golf’s biggest events.

It’s 7:33. Donald stuck his tee in the ground and waited for the go-ahead. Silence, again. His tee shot with a 3-wood faded down the right side, but received a favorable kick into the fairway.

Bradley, another rookie, played first for the Americans. He’s a big hitter, with a nervy pre-shot routine, but in a few short moments he would select driver, visualize his shot and hammer one down the center. He walked toward the front of the tee, turned back and high-fived Mickelson.

It’s 7:46. After a 10-minute intermission, Zach Johnson and the laconic Jason Dufner walked across the bridge. Zach waved his arms; there were unconfirmed reports that Duf smiled.

As he waited to play, Dufner squatted and stretched, swung and spat, but his only acknowledgement of the crowd was a tip of his cap, like in those Comcast commercials.

It’s 7:50. Lee Westwood smashed a drive down the middle, and Dufner, after seven waggles, pulled his tee shot into the bunker. Advantage, Europe.

About 10 minutes later, Chicago Bulls legend Michael Jordan ambled over to the tee, awaiting the final group. Before long, Europe vice captain Miguel Angel Jimenez – Golf’s Most Interesting Man – greeted Jordan, and they chatted for a few moments. Discussing their love of cigars, perhaps?

It’s 8:02. The final group made its way toward the tee, the crowd now thinning a bit, only five rows deep along the sides.

Justin Rose and Ian Poulter were first to arrive, and then came Steve Stricker and Tiger Woods, the latter playing his first home Ryder Cup since 2004. His left hand stuffed in his pants pocket – surely the first time he’s worn blue plaid pants in competition – Woods doffed his hat to the crowd.

“Fourteen majors in this group!” a fan yelled.

Poulter found the first fairway, per usual in the Ryder Cup, but it was a different story for Woods. Setting up to hit a fade, he hit an ominous, ghastly, double-crossed snap-hook that nearly hit the tree and eventually came to rest near a fence – the worst tee ball of any of the eight competitors. Stricker walked ahead, eager to see the lie.

Now it was 8:07, and everyone in the morning foursomes was out on the course. A warm morning sun had lifted the temperature to 58 degrees, fans scrambled to find their next-best viewing area, and the day’s possibilities seemed limitless. 

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Rory: Phil said RC task force just copied Europe

By Randall MellFebruary 21, 2018, 7:21 pm

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Playing the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am two weeks ago, Rory McIlroy quizzed Phil Mickelson about what the Americans got out of the U.S. Ryder Cup task force’s overhaul.

McIlroy and Mickelson were paired together at Pebble Beach.

“Basically, all they are doing is copying what the Europeans have done,” McIlroy said.  “That's what he said.”

The Europeans claimed their sixth of seven Ryder Cups with their victory at Gleneagles in 2014. That brought about a sea change in the way the United States approached the Ryder Cup. Mickelson called out the tactics in Gleneagles of captain Tom Watson, who was outmaneuvered by European captain Paul McGinley.


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The Americans defeated Europe at Hazeltine two years ago with that new European model.

“He said the first thing they did in that task force was Phil played a video, a 12-minute video of Paul McGinley to all of them,” McIlroy said. “So, they are copying what we do, and it's working for them. It's more cohesive, and the team and the core of that team are more in control of what they are doing, instead of the PGA of America recruiting and someone telling them what to do.”

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Tiger Tracker: Honda Classic

By Tiger TrackerFebruary 21, 2018, 7:00 pm

Tiger Woods is making his third start of the year at the Honda Classic. We're tracking him at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.


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Woods happy to help Furyk at Ryder Cup

By Ryan LavnerFebruary 21, 2018, 6:58 pm

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Tiger Woods didn't hesitate when Jim Furyk asked him to become a vice captain at the upcoming Ryder Cup.

Woods said Wednesday that Furyk asked he and Steve Stricker “a while ago” whether they were interested in being assistants in Paris as the Americans try to win a Ryder Cup on foreign soil for the first time in 25 years.

“He’s one of my best friends,” Woods said of Furyk, “and whatever he wants, whatever he needs, I’m there to help him. We’re worked well the last couple of years in the cups together.”


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Though Woods has said that he wants to be a playing vice captain, he has been an assistant at each of the past two international team competitions.

Furyk, Woods and Stricker were all assistants at Hazeltine, where the U.S. won in a rout.

“Jim is very detailed, very smart, very analytical, and he’s just a fantastic leader,” Woods said. “For him to ask Stricks and I together, it will be special for both of us.”

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Woods to hit '4 or 5' drivers each day at Honda

By Ryan LavnerFebruary 21, 2018, 6:25 pm

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – Those hoping Tiger Woods will wield the driver early and often this week at PGA National likely will be disappointed.

Depending on wind direction, he said he will only hit “four or five” drivers each round.

During Wednesday’s pro-am, Woods hit driver on six holes. He found two fairways with the big stick and found the right rough four times, though a few of those misses were only a few yards off the fairway.


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In two starts this year, Woods has struggled mightily with every club off the tee, but driver has been especially troublesome. He has found only 36 percent of the fairways so far (30 of 84).

The Champion Course here is a par 70, with water and bunkers often lining the fairways. Putting the ball in play off the tee will be at a premium, and so Woods opted for a low, penetrating 2-iron six times in the pro-am.

Woods said he did not make any equipment changes following the missed cut at Riviera.