Woods can't capitalize on early momentum at Honda

By Will GrayMarch 2, 2013, 6:10 pm

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla. – A round that began with great promise for Tiger Woods ended with the world No. 2 right back where he began.

After racing out to three birdies across his first eight holes, Woods was unable to pick up any more strokes the rest of the way, and his early gains were wiped out by a tough-luck double bogey at the 17th. He once again left PGA National with an even-par 70, marking just the third time in his career where Woods shot the same score for each of the first three rounds of a PGA Tour event.


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'I was playing really solidly all day,' he said after the round. 'I caught a bad mud ball at 10...then on 17, just stuck it in the ground a little bit, caught the wind and ended up making double.'

Heading to the penultimate hole, Woods was 2 under on his round and had thoughts of a birdie-birdie finish. His tee shot to the par-3 was within 40 feet of the hole but came up short, plugging into the face of a bank below the pin. After several minutes of searching to even locate the ball proved fruitless, Woods was forced back to the tee.

'We didn't know if the ball was in the hazard or not,' Woods explained. 'So you don't know, and then it's a lost ball.'

With prime scoring conditions Saturday morning, Woods came out firing at flags from the start of his third round. An opening birdie was followed by another at the par-5 third, and the holes where Woods missed on the short side he was able to save par, taking only 12 putts on the front nine.

'Realistically, if you play well, you can shoot about five or six under par, there's no doubt,' he noted. 'The greens are perfectly smooth out there.'

Woods' last birdie of the day came at the eighth hole, though, as the putts failed to fall on the back nine. Heading into the final round needing to replicate last year's 8-under 62 to even have a chance to contend, the 14-time major champ insists that his game is not far from where he wants it to be.

'My iron game is pretty good and my short game is way better than it was at Torrey. I feel very comfortable with my putting,' he added. 'I need to obviously get it in play a little bit more and attack from there, because everything else is pretty good.'

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Watch: Tiger's Sunday birdies at the Honda

By Golf Channel DigitalFebruary 25, 2018, 6:40 pm

One day after he left a barrage of birdie opportunities out on the golf course, Tiger Woods worked his way into red figures early on Sunday.

Seven off the pace to start the day, Woods found the first fairway, hit the first green and rolled in a 20-footer for his firist birdie of the day.

After narrowly missing a 10-footer for what would have been another circle at the par-5 third, Woods came right back at the fourth, flying an approach from 148 yards to 9 feet and finishing the job.

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New-look Korda wins after serious jaw surgery

By Will GrayFebruary 25, 2018, 6:31 pm

If the pictures of Jessica Korda from the Honda LPGA Thailand cause you to do a double-take, you're not alone.

Korda's world-class talent was on full display this week in Asia, where she won by four shots, but so too was her new-look face. The 24-year-old underwent serious jaw surgery in December, a final attempt to address a significant overbite that led to ailments ranging from facial cramping to headaches to sleep apnea.

The procedure was intense. Doctors first broke her nose, then broke her jaw in five different places - three on the top, and two on the bottom. She now has 27 screws in her face, and the physical result still requires some adjustment for a woman who now has five career LPGA wins.

"I look at pictures of myself and I don't feel like I look like that person," Korda told Golfweek. "I don't know who that is. And then I look at pictures of my old self and that doesn't look like me either."


Full-field scores from the Honda LPGA Thailand


The Dec. 7 surgery left Korda unable to eat, with her mother reportedly feeding her through a syringe for "weeks." Korda's facial structure before the surgery was such that she was only using 20 percent of her teeth when chewing food.

But despite returning to practice only six weeks ago and still dealing with lingering numbness in her face, Korda promptly dusted a world-class field in her first start back. She shot 25 under for the week, highlighted by a second-round 62, leaving the likes of Lexi Thompson and Ariya Jutanugarn in her wake.

After a difficult winter, Korda's look may have changed but her game clearly remains unaffected.

"Coming in after surgery, I didn't know what to expect," Korda told reporters. "Obviously when I look at myself, I still don't feel like I look like myself yet. That will come. I'm just very, very happy. All the hard work I was putting in in the off-season when I could has paid off rather quickly."

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Tiger Tracker: Honda Classic

By Tiger TrackerFebruary 25, 2018, 4:45 pm

Tiger Woods is making his third start of the year at the Honda Classic. We're tracking him at PGA National in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.


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Hahn jabs USGA over possible ball rollback

By Will GrayFebruary 25, 2018, 4:43 pm

As debate continues to heat up over possible sweeping changes to the golf ball amid distance concerns, PGA Tour pro James Hahn chimed in to question the merits of a potential rollback.

The ball and distance debate gained traction earlier this week when Jack Nicklaus offered that the ball should be rolled back to the approximate distances achieved in 1995, and he put blame for the current situation squarely at the feet of Titleist. That drew a response from former Titleist CEO Wally Uihlein, who put the onus back on the governing bodies.

It's an issue that will likely be discussed for months to come, but Hahn took to Twitter to throw a jab toward the USGA and play devil's advocate on some key arguments related to a possible rollback:

Hahn, who has two career PGA Tour wins and lost in a playoff last month at the Sony Open, ranks 55th on Tour this season in driving distance with an average of 301.2 yards off the tee.