More Great Arizona Golf The Cerebral

By Jay FlemmaJanuary 21, 2009, 5:00 pm

wekopa hole 8
The par-5 8th hole at We-ko-pa Golf Club offers sweeping views of the Yavapai mountain range.

 
Last time, we looked at some major Scottsdale and Tucson resorts for great golf getaways. Now lets look at some daily-fee courses with intelligent designs that raise the bar not only in the state, but the entire country.
 
The great story of We-ko-pa Golf Club, (http://www.wekopa.com), in the Fort McDowell region of Scottsdale is beginning to spread, and We-ko-pa is more than ready for its close-up. We-ko-pa (Yavapai for 'Four Peaks,' the name of a nearby mountain range) is not just another pretty resort in the desert in the desert. At the Cholla Course Scott Miller has produced his most daring and interesting work to date. At the Saguaro Course, Ben Crenshaw and Bill Coore built a stellar rejoinder to their other Scottsdale minimalist masterpiece at Talking Stick (North Course). In both cases, the Yavapai Indian Nation had the courage to think out of the box and embrace one of the wisest trends in the golf industry: spend less money, and move less earth to get a better golf course.
 
Miller used diagonally placed dry washes as the bulk of the Cholla course's hazards. On many holes there are hazards in the direct line of flight between the tee box and the green: sometimes a bunker, sometimes a dry wash, other times a stately specimen Saguaro cactus. Fairways can be as wide as 80 yards, to accommodate ways around these center-line hazards, offering multiple angles of play both to the left or right. You could also try to pound one over the hazard or lay up short. Miller also uses optical illusions, frequently placing bunkers thirty yards short of the green, while making them greenside from the fairway.
 
For an encore, the Yavapai hired Crenshaw and Coore, who had already scored significant successes in the desert with Talking Stick North, to build the second course and make the entire facility one of the connoisseurs choices in a hyper-competitive market flush with great golf.
 
Although the course is minimalist, it preserves and showcases the sites stunning natural features. It doesnt bulldoze them into oblivion, said Scottsdales Brian Roswig. Coore and Crenshaw are also masters of strategic bunkering, and their use of diagonal hazards creates cunning holes where you really have to play smart golf. It rivals The Boulders, I think.
 
If youre going to see one Coore and Crenshaw in the Valley, you might as well see two and play Talking Sticks North Course. Once again, the designers moved almost no earth in routing the golf course. By recreating the firm, fast conditions of the U.K., there is a lot of bump and run, one bounce and on iron play, and feeding the ball to hole locations. The course is so flat and open, that it plays havoc with depth perception.
 
Most greens are open in front to promote the bump and run. As its public golf, we wanted some spots that are forgiving for the public player, said architect Bill Coore. It was a totally flat property and Ben and I wanted to have the course reflect that in its contouring. In order to make it blend with its surroundings, we made wide holes. There is a lot of latitude, but we still were able to present interesting playing concepts, he explained. Take one of my favorites, the short par-4 12th, they all could drive the green or hit it out of bounds or can make birdie by playing safe.
 
Both We-ko-pas and Talking Sticks broad general appeal and reasonable price show exactly how good a course minimalism can produce. Less is more.
 

Jay Flemma
Since launching his first golf writing website in 2004, Jay Flemma's comparative analysis of golf designs and knowledge of golf course architecture and golf travel have garnered wide industry respect. In researching his book on America's great public golf courses (and whether they're worth the money), Jay, an associate editor of Cybergolf, has played over 260 nationally ranked public golf courses in 39 different states. Jay has played about 1,649,000 yards of golf - or roughly 938 miles. His pieces on travel and architecture appear in Golf Observer, Cybergolf and other print magazines. When not researching golf courses for design, value and excitement, Jay is an entertainment, copyright, Internet and trademark lawyer and an Entertainment and Internet Law professor in Manhattan.
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Fleetwood flawless en route to Abu Dhabi lead

By Will GrayJanuary 18, 2018, 2:06 pm

New year, same results for Tommy Fleetwood.

The reigning Race to Dubai champ picked up where he left off in the opening round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, carding a bogey-free 66 during which the Englishman found all 18 greens in regulation. At 6 under, he shares the lead with Japan's Hideto Tanihara and sits one shot clear of five other players.

"Very stress-free. Played really well from start to finish," Fleetwood said. "Felt like I did what you need to do around this golf course, which is drive it well, hit your irons solid. You can't really be too greedy a lot of the time, and then sort of my pace putting was really good. So basically just did what you need to do to get a good score around this golf course, and I got one."


Full-field scores from the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship


Fleetwood shined in a marquee grouping that included world No. 1 Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy, as he birdied three holes on each nine. This is his first worldwide start since a T-3 finish at the Hero World Challenge.

It was at this event a year ago that Fleetwood sparked a career campaign, edging Johnson and Pablo Larrazabal for the win. He added another win at the French Open in the summer to go along with a pair of runner-up results and a T-4 finish at the U.S. Open, all of which helped him capture the European Tour's season-long title.

Fleetwood's sudden success in Abu Dhabi serves as a microcosm for his career resurgence. Prior to last year's victory, he had missed the cut in four of his five other trips to this event.

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Sergio starts season with 66 in Singapore

By Associated PressJanuary 18, 2018, 12:56 pm

SINGAPORE – Sergio Garcia opened his season with a 5-under 66 and a share of the clubhouse lead on Thursday in the first round of the weather-interrupted Singapore Open.

Playing his first tournament of the year, the Masters champion rebounded after making an early bogey to collect four birdies and an eagle at the Sentosa Golf Club.

He was later joined by American qualifier Kurt Kitayama in the clubhouse lead. Still on the course, Tirawat Kaewsiribandit was at 6 under through 16 holes when play was suspended for the day because of the threat of lightning.

Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 Open champion, was at 5 under through 16 holes when he also had to stop his round because of the weather.

Of the players who did finish their opening rounds, only three were within two strokes of Garcia and Kitayama. One of them was Casey O'Toole, who aced the par-3 second with a 7-iron.



The 38-year-old Garcia dropped his only shot of the day on the par-4 15th, his sixth hole after teeing off on the back nine, when he missed the fairway and was unable to make par. But he made amends when he birdied the par-3 17th and then eagled the par-5 18th to go out in 33.

''I was 1 over after (the) seventh but it didn't feel like I was playing badly,'' said Garcia, who made birdies on each of the two par 5s and one of the par 3s on the second nine. ''But then I hit two greats in a row for holes 17 and 18. I got a birdie-eagle there, so that settled me a little bit and I could play solid in the back nine and it was a great round.''

Garcia made the shortlist for the Laureus Sports Awards in the Breakthrough of the Year category after claiming his first major at Augusta National last year and is hoping for more success this season.

He credits the Singapore Open as having played a part in toughening him up for his Masters win because he opted to start his 2017 campaign in the stifling humidity of Southeast Asia to prepare himself for the bigger tournaments ahead.

Although he finished tied for 11th in Singapore, Garcia won the Dubai Desert Classic the next week and was in peak form when he won the Masters two months later.

Kitayama only secured his place in the $1 million event on Monday by finishing at the top of the qualifying competition, but he made a strong start with birdies on three of his first five holes. The 25-year-old Thai was 6 under through 13 holes but spoiled his otherwise flawless round with a bogey on his last.

''I started with a birdie and I just let it roll from there. I had some good tee shots, which I think, is the biggest thing for this course,'' Kitayama said. ''I'm a little tired, but I'm hanging in there. Whenever I have time off, I'll try not to think too much about golf.''

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13-year-old beats DJ in closest-to-the-pin contest

By Ryan LavnerJanuary 18, 2018, 12:26 pm

Dustin Johnson didn’t just get beat by Tommy Fleetwood and Rory McIlroy on Day 1 of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship.

Even a 13-year-old got the best of the world No. 1.

Oscar Murphy teed off on the 177-yard 15th hole as part of the tournament’s Beat the Pro challenge during the opening round. The Northern Irishman, one of the HSBC’s Future Falcons, carved a 3-wood toward a back-right pin, about 25 feet away, closer than both Johnson and Fleetwood.

“An unbelievable shot,” Fleetwood said afterward, “and me and Rory both said, ‘We don’t have that in our locker.’”



Johnson still made par on the hole, but he mixed four birdies with four bogeys Thursday for an even-par 72 that left him six shots back of Fleetwood and Hideto Tanihara after the opening round.

Johnson, who tied for second here a year ago, is coming off a dominant performance at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, where he won by eight shots to strengthen his lead atop the world rankings. 

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McIlroy 'really pleased' with opening 69 in Abu Dhabi

By Ryan LavnerJanuary 18, 2018, 12:10 pm

It was an auspicious 2018 debut for Rory McIlroy.

Playing alongside world No. 1 Dustin Johnson for his first round since October, McIlroy missed only one green and shot a bogey-free 69 at the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship. McIlroy is three shots back of reigning Race to Dubai champion Tommy Fleetwood, who played in the same group as McIlroy and Johnson, and Hideto Tanihara.

Starting on the back nine at Abu Dhabi Golf Club, McIlroy began with 11 consecutive pars before birdies on Nos. 3, 7 and 8.


Full-field scores from the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship


“I was excited to get going,” he told reporters afterward. “The last couple of months have been really nice in terms of being able to concentrate on things I needed to work on in my game and health-wise. I feel like I’m the most prepared for a season that I’ve ever been, but it was nice to get back out there.”

Fleetwood, the defending champion, raced out to another lead while McIlroy and Johnson, who shot 72, just tried to keep pace.

“Tommy played very well and I was just trying to hang onto his coattails for most of the round, so really pleased – bogey-free 69, I can’t really complain,” McIlroy said.

This was his first competitive round in more than three months, since a tie for 63rd at the Dunhill Links. He is outside the top 10 in the world ranking for the first time since 2014.