Swede Leads Canadian Q-School

By Marty HenwoodFebruary 7, 2003, 5:00 pm
Canadian Tour-LargeORLANDO, Fla. -- Anders Hultman of Sweden lit it up on his back nine Thursday to take the lead after four rounds at the Canadian Tours Winter Qualifying School.
 
The 23-year-old Swedish national team member, who began his round on the 10th tee, carded a 5-under 31 over his final nine en route to a 5-under 67. His 72-hole total of 7-under 281 is one shot better than Japans Dai Tanaka, Steve Marino of Fairfax, Va., and Erik Compton of Cleveland, Ohio.
 
Sixty players were 11'over 299 or better after 72 holes and advance to Fridays final round. The Canadian Tour will award 20 exempt and 15 non-exempt cards for the 2003 season after Friday.
 
After making the turn at even-par 36, Hultman, a former NCAA All-American, turned it up a notch on the back side, thanks in part to a double eagle on the par-5 third hole when he holed out from 200 yards with a 5-iron.
 
Its not every day you can do that, so it can make for a good day in a hurry, admitted Hultman, adding he thinks his group was on the right side of the draw Thursday morning. There was no wind early, so we were able to play those tough holes on our front side with no major problems. It made things a whole lot easier.
 
Compton is one of the feel-good stories in the world of professional golf. After undergoing a heart transplant at the age 12, he went on to become an All-American at Georgia, was a member of the United States Walker and Palmer Cup squads and played on the Nationwide (then Buy.com Tour) last year. This week he is attempting to join the ranks of the Canadian Tour, where several of his friends currently play.
 
Its funny, all my life people have told me I cant do something, and every time I try to prove them wrong, said the 23-year-old. Tell me I cant climb a mountain, and I am going to climb it twice.
 
On Friday, Compton admits he will go in with the same approach as he has had all week. Despite his lofty peach on the leaderboard, it has been anything but a routine week for him. Two days before he arrived in Orlando, his older brother, Christian, broke his neck in a skiing accident in Norway, and members of his family have rushed to be at his bedside. He remains in intensive care in a Norwegian hospital, but he has been lucid enough to talk to his brother on the phone.
 
Not that you had to tell me, but what happened to him really keeps things in perspective added Compton. It just shows how fast things can happen, and at that end of the day, it emphasizes that golf is just a game.
 
Scores Thursday after the fourth round of the Canadian Tour's Winter Qualifying School being held at the National and International courses at ChampionsGate ( 60 players were 11-over 299 or better to make the cut and will play the International course Friday. The Canadian Tour will award 20 exempt and 15 non-exempt playing cards for the 2003 season after the play Friday):
 
1 Hultman, Anders Sweden 72 70 72 67 281 -7
T2 Tanaka, Dai Japan 70 74 69 69 282 -6
T2 Compton, Erik Cleveland, OH 72 72 70 68 282 -6
T2 Marino, Steve Fairfax, VA 77 69 69 67 282 -6
5 Edmond, Pascal France 72 77 69 65 283 -5
6 Miller, Ryan West Alexandria, OH 73 70 70 71 284 -4
T7 Gibson, Scott Huntington Beach, CA 74 69 70 73 286 -2
T7 Bachman, John Orlando, FL 73 71 72 70 286 -2
T9 Donovan, Matt Pittsfield, MA 71 77 70 69 287 -1
T9 Davey, Nick New Zealand 72 70 73 72 287 -1
T9 Allred, Jason Scottsdale, AZ 70 74 73 70 287 -1
T9 Corbett, Clark Long Beach, CA 74 72 72 69 287 -1
T13 Centers, Derrick Somerset, KY 69 74 76 69 288 0
T13 Damron, Patrick Orlando, FL 73 71 70 74 288 0
T15 Torres, Jesus Mexico 72 71 73 73 289 1
T15 Higton, Jason Fresno, CA 75 71 73 70 289 1
17 Bettencourt, Matt Modesto, CA 71 72 76 71 290 2
T18 Jensen, Clint Palm Beach Gardens, FL 69 75 76 71 291 3
T18 Pigott, Sam Kent, England 72 73 72 74 291 3
T18 Mikkelsen, Kris Dunwoody, GA 71 75 72 73 291 3
T18 Shuert, Steve St. Louis, MO 72 75 74 70 291 3
T22 Goti, Ramiro Buenos Aires, Argentina 71 71 75 75 292 4
T22 Patrick, David Scotland 71 72 77 72 292 4
T24 Coughlan, Richie Ireland 77 72 72 72 293 5
T24 Parra, Chris Tequesta, FL 71 74 76 72 293 5
T24 Horacek, Sandy Los Angeles, CA 75 71 78 69 293 5
T24 Salinetti, Jim West Palm Beach, FL 74 73 76 70 293 5
T24 Habig, Josh Jasper, IN 75 72 71 75 293 5
T24 Wightman, Tele Chicopee, MA 75 73 74 71 293 5
T30 Trevino, Chris Chula Vista, CA 76 76 69 73 294 6
T30 Patterson, John Hilton Head, SC 74 72 74 74 294 6
T30 Argiro, Eduardo Argentina 71 77 76 70 294 6
T33 Lane, Matthew New Zealand 77 75 71 72 295 7
T33 Horowitz, Joe Long Beach, NY 68 82 72 73 295 7
T33 Lower, Johua Englewood, FL 75 74 77 69 295 7
T33 Kim, Christopher Fullerton, CA 68 75 76 76 295 7
T33 Erickson, Tyler Tempe, AZ 73 74 77 71 295 7
T33 Byers, Aaron Albany, OR 80 67 74 74 295 7
T39 Desjardins, Carl Ste. Catherine, QC 78 71 74 73 296 8
T39 Oppenheim, Rob Andover, MA 73 76 74 73 296 8
T39 Snelling, Justin Boise, ID 75 77 75 70 297 9
T39 Carman, Brett Claysville, PA 72 78 74 73 297 9
T39 Watt, James Lodi, CA 76 74 77 70 297 9
T39 Lavoie, Ryan West Palm Beach, FL 72 73 72 80 297 9
T39 Yi, Dong Alameda, CA 73 73 76 75 297 9
T39 Brown, Michael Cheltenham, PA 73 74 79 71 297 9
T39 Bradford, George Columbia, MD 72 76 78 71 297 9
T48 Gentry, Brian Tahoe City, CA 77 76 72 73 298 10
T48 Kanesaka, Fumio Japan 72 82 71 73 298 10
T48 Hibler, Jesse Boise, ID 72 78 73 75 298 10
T48 Fribley, Chad Tualatin, OR 77 72 78 71 298 10
T48 Williamson, Lee Crawfordsville, IN 72 77 77 72 298 10
T48 Nelson, Drew Woodstock, GA 73 73 75 77 298 10
T48 Hong, Chang Bethesda, MD 74 74 76 74 298 10
T55 Cuthbertson, Phil Rocklin, CA 76 76 76 71 299 11
T55 Lemon, Jim Madison, WI 74 77 73 75 299 11
T55 Takacs, Brendan Clearwater, FL 71 78 80 70 299 11
T55 Wheatcroft, Steven Tequesta, FL 74 75 77 73 299 11
T55 Hastings, Brad Easton, MD 71 73 79 76 299 11
T55 Harnden, Brandon Portland, OR 74 74 76 75 299 11
 
The following players did not make the cut:
 
T61 Peltomaki, Jyry Finland 73 79 75 73 300 12
T61 Beyer, Cody Tucson, AZ 74 78 72 76 300 12
T61 Jang, Jae Indio, CA 74 79 74 73 300 12
T61 Slowinski, Matt Glen Ellyn, Il 81 74 72 73 300 12
T61 Harvey, Billy Las Vegas, NV 78 77 74 71 300 12
T61 Goik, Brent Bay City, MI 77 72 75 76 300 12
T61 Wyatt, Charles Tampa, FL 73 75 77 75 300 12
T68 Wright, Justin Livermore, CA 74 78 76 73 301 13
T68 Fonner, Matthew Saratoga, CA 79 72 76 74 301 13
T68 Douglas, Rob Stratford, ON 78 73 79 71 301 13
T68 Kemp, Korky Greensboro, NC 79 72 77 73 301 13
T68 Dailey, John Frisco, TX 74 77 74 76 301 13
T68 Peluso, Todd Palm City, FL 72 78 79 72 301 13
T74 Stewart, Travis Jamestown, NC 85 73 74 70 302 14
T74 Davidson, Graham Langholm, Scotland 74 78 74 76 302 14
T74 Larrea, Santiago Spain 75 78 75 74 302 14
T74 Koch, Shawn Howell, MI 76 77 72 77 302 14
T74 Kitts, Ben Summerfield, FL 79 75 74 74 302 14
T74 Vitali, Peter Tequesta, FL 77 78 74 73 302 14
T74 Rohrbaugh, Doug Carbondale, CO 80 76 75 71 302 14
T74 Knudsen, Erik Orlando, FL 74 73 75 80 302 14
T82 Weatherly, Scott Fort Payne, AL 77 75 78 73 303 15
T82 Williams, Mark New Zealand 76 76 77 74 303 15
T82 Saglio, Matthew Clearwater, FL 78 75 75 75 303 15
T82 Herberth, Erik Avon Lake, OH 77 77 74 75 303 15
T82 Ellis, Ryan Draper, UT 80 75 73 75 303 15
T82 Rodriguez, Miguel Argentina 76 80 73 74 303 15
T82 Bloxham, Jordan West Jordan, UT 75 77 77 74 303 15
T82 Jenkins, Steven Chesterfield, VA 76 76 75 76 303 15
T82 Van Rensburg, Morne South Africa 80 71 76 76 303 15
T82 Link, William Acton, MA 73 78 79 73 303 15
T82 Heffernan, John Humboldt, SK 76 73 78 76 303 15
T82 Tolliver, Billy Joe Shreveport, LA 75 73 84 71 303 15
T94 Karnow, Kyle Elk Grove, CA 76 76 77 75 304 16
T94 Sauger, Mark Cape Coral, FL 77 76 77 74 304 16
T94 Campbell, Chris Surprise, AZ 74 79 73 78 304 16
T94 Ilic, Zoran Lakeland, FL 76 78 73 77 304 16
T94 Sueki, Tsuyoshi Japan 78 77 75 74 304 16
T94 Walters, Barry Yakima, WA 75 76 75 78 304 16
T94 Havens, David Wytheville, VA 77 73 80 74 304 16
T94 Duncan, TJ Carson City, NV 74 75 79 76 304 16
T94 Loving, Matthew Corpus Cristi, TX 74 73 79 78 304 16
T94 Boner, Brett Charlotte, NC 72 76 79 77 304 16
T104 Sine, Josh Springfield, OH 78 79 75 73 305 17
T104 Mortimer, Jamie Waterloo, ON 84 69 77 75 305 17
T104 Flugstad, Brian Seattle, WA 75 77 76 77 305 17
T104 Martin, Trey Phoenix, AZ 74 78 76 77 305 17
T104 McCammon, Jeff Jupiter, FL 74 77 74 80 305 17
T104 Moore, Michael Mississauga, ON 76 75 77 77 305 17
T104 Horodesky, Gregory Las Vegas, NV 73 78 76 78 305 17
T104 Werley, CJ Coshocton, OH 76 72 79 78 305 17
T112 DeLeon, Daniel Mexico 77 83 76 70 306 18
T112 Brost, Matt Austin, TX 74 78 77 77 306 18
T112 Stevens, Kevin Menlo Park, CA 78 77 76 75 306 18
T112 Lacroix, Brandon Roanoke, VA 82 73 75 76 306 18
T112 Fosdick, Joshua Nashville, TN 74 74 80 78 306 18
T117 Corson, Adam Potomac, MD 80 81 69 77 307 19
T117 Edmond, Olivier France 81 81 75 70 307 19
T117 Evangelist, Shane Irving, TX 79 79 77 72 307 19
T117 Laing, Jason New Zealand 75 79 75 78 307 19
T117 Levy, Jon Scottsdale, AZ 77 79 75 76 307 19
122 McAfee, Alan Germantown, TN 78 77 79 74 308 20
123 Ping, David Ypsilanti, MI 78 78 75 78 309 21
T124 Jeong, Tae Korea 75 84 71 80 310 22
T124 Leao, Ivo Brazil 79 79 75 77 310 22
T124 Gatchel, Matt Palm Harbor, FL 76 77 72 85 310 22
T124 Corcoran, Rob South Windsor, CT 78 77 76 79 310 22
T124 Cannon, Brad Phoenix, AZ 73 79 79 79 310 22
T124 Mathews, Stan Monteca, CA 77 71 86 76 310 22
T124 DiMuccio, Joey New Castle, PA 74 74 84 78 310 22
T131 Maki, Peter Franklin, MA 78 79 78 76 311 23
T131 Makino, Yuji Japan 75 82 80 74 311 23
T131 Stone, Jason Brentwood, CA 80 75 75 81 311 23
T131 Hutsell, David Baltimore,MD 74 78 81 78 311 23
T135 Giordano, Davidde Rochester, NY 76 81 72 83 312 24
T135 Okushima, Tomoaki Japan 74 78 77 83 312 24
T135 San Gabriel, Paulo Covina, CA 77 79 73 83 312 24
T138 Licursi, Daniel Chatsworth, CA 79 82 74 78 313 25
T138 Shears, Jared Roy, UT 82 76 78 77 313 25
T138 Rudolph, John La Jolla, CA 77 80 74 82 313 25
141 Heiple, Josh Sturgis, MI 84 79 77 74 314 26
T142 Banks, Ben England 82 79 73 81 315 27
T142 Coughlin, Peter Punta Gorda, FL 76 84 72 83 315 27
T142 Cohen, Itamar Israel 75 80 83 77 315 27
T142 Ki, Yuji Japan 74 82 79 80 315 27
T146 Smith, Brandon Tucson, AZ 81 77 81 77 316 28
T146 Miller, Scott Royal Palm Beach, FL 79 79 82 76 316 28
T146 Busby Jr., John St. George, UT 79 78 80 79 316 28
T149 Gavlak, Zac Palmer, AK 81 82 79 75 317 29
T149 Sessions, Dean Westminster, CO 78 83 78 78 317 29
T151 Takase, Atsushi Japan 80 85 75 78 318 30
T151 Thornburg, Michael Hendersonville, NC 79 84 84 71 318 30
T151 Paganini, Lou Naples, FL 76 81 81 80 318 30
T151 Slawson, J.D. Austin, TX 77 79 79 83 318 30
T155 Harrison, Jeremy Hollywood, FL 84 81 73 81 319 31
T155 Tassic, Don Northville, MI 85 77 75 82 319 31
T155 McGaha, Benji Easley, SC 81 80 79 79 319 31
T158 Veres, Mike Logan, West VA 81 78 85 77 321 33
T158 Hodgkinson, Richard England 77 80 86 78 321 33
T160 Paul, Thomas Scottsdale, AZ 82 86 74 80 322 34
T160 Nomura, Eric Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 78 80 83 81 322 34
162 Slabbert, Gavin Roseville, CA 82 81 80 80 323 35
T163 Guilder, Tony Irvine, CA 84 83 79 80 326 38
T163 Fuhr, Grant Edmonton, AB 73 86 82 85 326 38
165 Nakatsuka, Kazuta Japan 79 90 79 80 328 40
T166 Hasson, Felipe Brazil 80 86 82 81 329 41
T166 Irie, Norio Gardenia, CA 77 86 84 82 329 41
168 Humerickhouse, Keith Boca Raton, FL 81 83 82 84 330 42
169 Kuliesh, John Lewisburg, W.V. 80 90 76 86 332 44
T170 Newboldt, Tim Kihei, HI 79 90 79 85 333 45
T170 Caldwell, Raymond San Antonio, TX 82 87 81 83 333 45
172 Stevens, Noah Austin, TX 84 83 84 85 336 48
173 Pereira, Jeff Vancouver, BC 92 81 83 88 344 56
174 Chor, Michael Cambodia 88 92 83 82 345 57
175 Smith, Lang Lakeland, TN 89 94 85 89 357 69
176 Vitorino, Tito Sarasota, FL 93 89 89 88 359 71
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DJ changes tune on golf ball distance debate

By Will GrayJanuary 17, 2018, 9:16 pm

World No. 1 Dustin Johnson is already one of the longest hitters in golf, so he's not looking for any changes to be made to golf ball technology - despite comments from him that hinted at just such a notion two months ago.

Johnson is in the Middle East this week for the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, and he told BBC Sport Wednesday that he wouldn't be in favor of making changes to the golf ball in order to remedy some of the eye-popping distances players are hitting the ball with ever-increasing frequency.

"It's not like we are dominating golf courses," Johnson said. "When was the last time you saw someone make the game too easy? I don't really understand what all the debate is about because it doesn't matter how far it goes; it is about getting it in the hole."

Johnson's rhetorical question might be answered simply by looking back at his performance at the Sentry Tournament of Champions earlier this month, an eight-shot romp that featured a tee shot on the 433-yard 12th hole that bounded down a slope to within inches of the hole.

Johnson appeared much more willing to consider a reduced-distance ball option at the Hero World Challenge in November, when he sat next to tournament host Tiger Woods and supported Woods' notion that the ball should be addressed.

"I don't mind seeing every other professional sport, they play with one ball. All the pros play with the same ball," Johnson said. "In baseball, the guys that are bigger and stronger, they can hit a baseball a lot further than the smaller guys. ... I think there should be some kind of an advantage for guys who work on hitting it far and getting that speed that's needed, so having a ball, like the same ball that everyone plays, there's going to be, you're going to have more of an advantage."

Speaking Wednesday in Abu Dhabi, Johnson stood by the notion that regardless of whether the rules change or stay the same, he plans to have a leg up on the competition.

"If the ball is limited then it is going to limit everyone," he said. "I'm still going to hit it that much further than I guess the average Tour player."

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LPGA lists April date for new LA event

By Golf Channel DigitalJanuary 17, 2018, 8:18 pm

The LPGA’s return to Los Angeles will come with the new Hugel-JTBC Open being played at Wilshire Country Club April 19-22, the tour announced Wednesday.

When the LPGA originally released its schedule, it listed the Los Angeles event with the site to be announced at a later date.

The Hugel-JTBC Open will feature a 144-player field and a $1.5 million purse. It expands the tour’s West Coast swing, which will now be made up of four events in California in March and April.

The LPGA last played in Los Angeles in 2005. Wilshire Country Club hosted The Office Depot in 2001, with Annika Sorenstam winning there.

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Tour's Integrity Program raises gambling questions

By Rex HoggardJanuary 17, 2018, 7:00 pm

The video begins with an eye-opening disclaimer: “Sport betting markets produce revenues of $1 trillion each year.”

For all the seemingly elementary elements of the 15-minute video PGA Tour players have been required to watch as part of the circuit’s newly created Integrity Program, it’s the enormity of the industry – $1 trillion annually – that concerns officials.

There are no glaring examples of how sport betting has impacted golf, no red flags that sent Tour officials into damage control; just a realization that with that kind of money it’s best to be proactive.

“It's important that in that world, you can operate not understanding what's happening week in and week out, or you can assume that all of our players and everybody in our ecosystem understands that that's not an acceptable activity, or you can just be proactive and clarify and educate,” Tour commissioner Jay Monahan explained earlier this month. “That's what we have attempted to do not with just the video, but with all of our communication with our players and will continue to do that.”

But if clarification is the goal, a copy of the training video obtained by GolfChannel.com paints a different picture.



Although the essence of the policy is straightforward – “prohibit players from betting on professional golf” – the primary concern, at least if the training video is any indication, is on match fixing; and warns players to avoid divulging what is considered “inside information.”

“I thought the questions were laughable. They were all like first-grade-level questions,” Chez Reavie said. “I would like to think everyone out here already knows the answer to those questions. But the Tour has to protect themselves.”

Monahan explained that the creation of the integrity policy was not in reaction to a specific incident and every player asked last week at the Sony Open said they had never encountered any type of match fixing.

“No, not at all,” Reavie said. “I have friends who will text me from home after a round, ‘Oh, I bet on you playing so-and-so.’ But I make it clear I don’t want to know. I don’t gamble like that. No one has ever approached me about losing a match.”

It was a common answer, but the majority of the video focuses on how players can avoid being placed in a compromising situation that could lead to match fixing. It should be noted that gamblers can place wagers on head-to-head matchups, provided by betting outlets, during stroke-play rounds of tournaments – not just in match-play competitions.

Part of the training video included questions players must answer to avoid violating the policy. An example of this was how a player should respond when asked, “Hello, buddy! Well played today. I was following your progress. I noticed your partner pulled out of his approach on 18, looked like his back. Is he okay for tomorrow?”

The correct answer from a list of options was, “I don’t know, sorry. I’m sure he will get it looked at if it’s bothering him.”

You get the idea, but for some players the training created more questions.

How, for example, should a player respond when asked how he’s feeling by a fan?

“The part I don’t understand, let’s say a member of your club comes out and watches you on the range hitting balls, he knows you’re struggling, and he bets against you. Somehow, some way that could come back to you, according to what I saw on that video,” said one player who asked not to be identified.

Exactly what constitutes a violation is still unclear for some who took the training, which was even more concerning considering the penalties for a violation of the policy.

The first violation is a warning and a second infraction will require the player to retake the training program, but a third violation is a fine “up to $500,000” or “the amount illegally received from the betting activity.” A sixth violation is a lifetime ban from the Tour.

Players are advised to be mindful of what they post on social media and to “refrain from talking about odds or betting activity.” The latter could be an issue considering how often players discuss betting on other sports.

Just last week at the Sony Open, Kevin Kisner and Justin Thomas had a “friendly” wager on the College Football Playoff National Championship. Kisner, a Georgia fan, lost the wager and had to wear an Alabama football jersey while playing the 17th hole last Thursday.

“If I'd have got the points, he'd have been wearing [the jersey], and I was lobbying for the points the whole week, and he didn't give them to me,” Kisner said. “So I'm still not sure about this bet.”

It’s unclear to some if Kisner’s remark, which was a joke and didn’t have anything to do with golf, would be considered a violation. From a common sense standpoint, Kisner did nothing wrong, but the uncertainty is an issue.

Much like drug testing, which the Tour introduced in 2008, few, if any, think sport betting is an issue in golf; but also like the anti-doping program, there appears to be the danger of an inadvertent and entirely innocent violation.

The Tour is trying to be proactive and the circuit has a trillion reasons to get out in front of what could become an issue, but if the initial reaction to the training video is any indication they may want to try a second take.

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Lexi looks to shine as LPGA season begins next week

By Randall MellJanuary 17, 2018, 6:06 pm

Lexi Thompson may be No. 4 in the Rolex Women’s World Rankings, but in so many ways she became the new face of the women’s game last year.

That makes her the headliner in a fairly star-studded season opener at the Pure Silk Bahamas Classic next week.

Three of the top four players in the Rolex Women’s World Rankings are scheduled to tee it up on Paradise Island, including world No. 1 Shanshan Feng and co-Rolex Player of the Year So Yeon Ryu.

From the heartache at year’s start with the controversial loss at the ANA Inspiration, through the angst in the middle of the year with her mother’s cancer diagnosis, to the stunning disappointment at year’s end, Thompson emerged as the story of the year because of all she achieved in spite of those ordeals.

Next week’s event will mark the first time Thompson tees it up in an LPGA tournament since her season ended in stunning fashion last November with a missed 2-foot putt that cost her a chance to win the CME Group Tour Championship and the Rolex Player of the Year Award, and become the world No. 1.

She still walked away with the CME Globe’s $1 million jackpot and the Vare Trophy for the season’s low scoring average.

She also walked away sounding determined to show she will bounce back from that last disappointment the same way she bounced back from her gut-wrenching loss at the year’s first major, the ANA, where a four-shot Sunday penalty cost her a chance to win her second major.

“Just going through what I have this whole year, and seeing how strong I am, and how I got through it all and still won two tournaments, got six seconds ... it didn’t stop me,” Thompson said leaving the CME Group Tour Championship. “This won’t either.”

Thompson was named the Golf Writers Association of America’s Player of the Year in a vote of GWAA membership. Ryu and Sung Hyun Park won the tour’s points-based Rolex Player of the Year Award.

With those two victories and six second-place finishes, three of those coming after playoff losses, Thompson was close to fashioning a spectacular year in 2017, to dominating the tour.

The new season opens with Thompson the center of attention again. Consistently one of the tour’s best ball strikers and longest hitters, she enjoyed her best year on tour last season by making dramatic improvements in her wedge play, short game and, most notably, her putting.

She doesn’t have a swing coach. She fashioned a better all-around game on her own, or under the watchful eye of her father, Scott. All the work she put in showed up in her winning the Vare Trophy.

The Pure Silk Bahamas Classic will also feature defending champion Brittany Lincicome, as well as Ariya Jutanugarn, Stacy Lewis, Michelle Wie, Brooke Henderson, I.K. Kim, Danielle Kang and Charley Hull.