The top 10 greatest shots to win a major

By Randall MellApril 11, 2012, 7:10 pm

Our minds are like filing cabinets.

It doesn’t matter whether we are tasting a vintage wine for the first time, or we’ve just finished a terrific book, or we are marveling at some mountain vista, we rifle through our memory looking to compare just how great the experience was. Is it the best glass of wine we’ve ever consumed? The best book we’ve ever read? The most magnificent view we have ever witnessed? It’s the same thing with Bubba Watson’s great escape from the trees right of the 10th fairway at Augusta National Sunday, his terrific recovery shot that helped him win the Masters.

In the history of great shots that helped win major championships, where does Watson’s shot rank?

It’s brutal work, narrowing down spectacular plays in majors. There’s no avoiding leaving some grand shots off the list, but it makes for great debate at the 19th hole or the water cooler.

So, here’s our take:

1. Gene Sarazen’s double eagle at the 1935 Masters

Wow factor: A double eagle is rarer than a hole-in-one, so pulling off that shot in the final round of a Masters’ victory ranks as the most staggering feat in major championship history. It was called “the shot heard ‘round the world.”

The lowdown: Sarazen holed a 4-wood from 235 yards at Augusta National’s 15th hole, erasing a three-shot deficit with a single swing. Notably, he was playing alongside his rival, Walter Hagen. Sarazen went on that Sunday to defeat Craig Wood in a playoff.


2. Tom Watson’s chip-in at the 1982 U.S. Open

Wow factor: Given Watson was tied for the lead with Jack Nicklaus, who already was in the clubhouse, the combination of nerve and touch it took to hole out from the deep rough behind the 17th green that Sunday at Pebble Beach makes Watson’s shot the most clutch chip in major championship history.

The lowdown: Watson drilled a 2-iron over the 17th green into the deep grass just off the putting surface, sending a buzz through the galleries at Pebble Beach. The mistake made it look like Nicklaus would win. Watson had more than the thick rough to navigate. He had a slippery downhill patch of green. Caddie Bruce Edwards famously told Watson to “Get it close.” Watson, more famously, told him, “I’m gonna make it.” Watson did, rattling an improbable birdie off the flagstick on his way to winning.


3. Larry Mize’s chip-in at the 1987 Masters

Wow factor: Mize was the classic underdog, the hometown Augusta boy who used to work the Masters’ leaderboards in his youth. That Mize, winner of just one PGA Tour event to that date, would knock off two of the titans of the time, Seve Ballesteros and Greg Norman, in a playoff added to the fairy-tale appeal of his chip-in to win at the second playoff hole (No. 11).

The lowdown: With Ballesteros eliminated at the first playoff hole, Mize took down Norman a hole later, improbably holing a 140-foot chip with a sand wedge from right of the 11th green to win.


4. Ben Hogan’s 1-iron at the 1950 U.S. Open

Wow factor: The fact that Hogan limped his way around Merion just 16 months after he was nearly killed in a head-on collision with a bus magnifies the dramatic nature of the shot that helped him win the U.S. Open.

The lowdown: Needing a par at the 72nd hole, with a stiff wind in his face, Hogan plucked a 1-iron from his bag. A 1-iron was notoriously difficult to control, but Hogan carved a wondrous shot into the 18th green, setting up a two-putt par that got him into a playoff he would win against Lloyd Mangrum and George Fazio.


5. Bob Tway’s bunker shot at the 1986 PGA Championship

Wow factor: All tied with Greg Norman going to the 72nd hole at Inverness, Tway looked doomed flying his approach into the sand aside the 18th green. He faced a bunker shot onto a treacherously quick green that sloped away from him. The delicate nature of the play under pressure added to the stunning quality of the unexpected hole out.

The lowdown: Nestling his bunker shot to a landing spot just a foot onto the green, Tway watched his shot gently roll into the hole. The excitement turned him into a human pogo stick as he leaped up and down in that bunker. Norman missed his chip and chance to force a playoff, making Tway the first player in modern history to win the PGA Championship with a birdie at the 72nd hole.


6. Tiger Woods’ chip-in at the 2005 Masters

Wow factor: After pulling his approach long and left of the 16th green that Sunday at Augusta National, Woods looked like he was going to have trouble getting up and down for par. A birdie didn’t seem possible from there.

The lowdown: A shot ahead, Woods ignited an explosion around the 16th when he chipped up onto the swale that makes that green so difficult, his ball taking a circuitous route to one of the most unlikely chip-ins in major championship history. Woods needed that birdie as he finished with back-to-back bogeys but still prevailed against Chris DiMarco in a playoff.


7. Jerry Pate’s 5-iron at the 1976 U.S. Open

Wow factor: Just 22 years old, Pate needed all his brashness and confidence to pull off a difficult shot from 190 yards out, from the rough, over a lake. He delivered a shot that made veterans marvel.

The lowdown: With a one-shot lead, Pate just missed the 18th fairway with a drive to right. Under enormous pressure, Pate knew a 4-iron would cover the distance with his normal swing, but his caddie, John Considine, warned they were faced with a flyer lie. So Pate decided on a 5-iron, instead, and he delivered a straight and true shot over all that wet trouble to within 2 feet to set up a closing birdie and seal his victory. “It was the highest, softest flyer you’ve ever seen,” Pate said.


8. Shaun Micheel’s 7-iron at the 2003 PGA Championship

Wow factor: A relative unknown, there were plenty of doubts whether Micheel could close the deal as he headed to the 18th hole that Sunday at Oak Hill. Nicklaus, Hogan or Woods couldn’t have delivered a better answer with a final full shot to win the PGA Championship.

The lowdown: With  a one-shot lead on Chad Campbell, Micheel missed the 18th fairway left, but from 175 yards out, he put the surest pass on a 7-iron he could muster, carving his approach shot to 2 inches to set up a closing birdie and claim the victory.


9. Phil Mickelson’s 6-iron at the 2010 Masters

Wow factor: Mickelson took a risky play at the 13th hole on that Sunday that could have made him repeat the line he uttered after blowing a shot off a hospitality tent to the lose the U.S. Open at Winged Foot in 2006: “I’m such an idiot,” he said in Winged Foot’s aftermath. Instead, Mickelson showed his genius.

The lowdown: It may not have been the high percentage shot, or the smartest shot, but it was a great shot. From the trees right of the 13th fairway, from 207 yards off pine straw, Mickelson threaded a narrow gap between a pair of trees to hit the green and set up a two-putt birdie that gave him the confidence and momentum he needed to finish off his victory there.


10. Bubba Watson’s gap wedge at the 2012 Masters

Wow factor: Under pressure at the second hole of a playoff, Watson shaped a shot around the trees that would have made Seve Ballesteros’ proud. Watson orchestrated one of the great escapes in major championship history to set up his victory.

The lowdown: After pulling his tee shot right and into the trees along the 10th fairway, Watson’s imagination became the 15th club in his bag. From 155 yards out, he used all his creative powers, slinging a hard hook with a gap wedge around the trees to within 10 feet of the flagstick for a two-putt par to defeat Louis Oosthuizen in a playoff. Watson had to keep the shot low, until it cleared one tree line, then watched it bend and rise to Masters’ fame.

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Fleetwood flawless en route to Abu Dhabi lead

By Will GrayJanuary 18, 2018, 2:06 pm

New year, same results for Tommy Fleetwood.

The reigning Race to Dubai champ picked up where he left off in the opening round of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, carding a bogey-free 66 during which the Englishman found all 18 greens in regulation. At 6 under, he shares the lead with Japan's Hideto Tanihara and sits one shot clear of five other players.

"Very stress-free. Played really well from start to finish," Fleetwood said. "Felt like I did what you need to do around this golf course, which is drive it well, hit your irons solid. You can't really be too greedy a lot of the time, and then sort of my pace putting was really good. So basically just did what you need to do to get a good score around this golf course, and I got one."


Full-field scores from the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship


Fleetwood shined in a marquee grouping that included world No. 1 Dustin Johnson and Rory McIlroy, as he birdied three holes on each nine. This is his first worldwide start since a T-3 finish at the Hero World Challenge.

It was at this event a year ago that Fleetwood sparked a career campaign, edging Johnson and Pablo Larrazabal for the win. He added another win at the French Open in the summer to go along with a pair of runner-up results and a T-4 finish at the U.S. Open, all of which helped him capture the European Tour's season-long title.

Fleetwood's sudden success in Abu Dhabi serves as a microcosm for his career resurgence. Prior to last year's victory, he had missed the cut in four of his five other trips to this event.

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Sergio starts season with 66 in Singapore

By Associated PressJanuary 18, 2018, 12:56 pm

SINGAPORE – Sergio Garcia opened his season with a 5-under 66 and a share of the clubhouse lead on Thursday in the first round of the weather-interrupted Singapore Open.

Playing his first tournament of the year, the Masters champion rebounded after making an early bogey to collect four birdies and an eagle at the Sentosa Golf Club.

He was later joined by American qualifier Kurt Kitayama in the clubhouse lead. Still on the course, Tirawat Kaewsiribandit was at 6 under through 16 holes when play was suspended for the day because of the threat of lightning.

Louis Oosthuizen, the 2010 Open champion, was at 5 under through 16 holes when he also had to stop his round because of the weather.

Of the players who did finish their opening rounds, only three were within two strokes of Garcia and Kitayama. One of them was Casey O'Toole, who aced the par-3 second with a 7-iron.



The 38-year-old Garcia dropped his only shot of the day on the par-4 15th, his sixth hole after teeing off on the back nine, when he missed the fairway and was unable to make par. But he made amends when he birdied the par-3 17th and then eagled the par-5 18th to go out in 33.

''I was 1 over after (the) seventh but it didn't feel like I was playing badly,'' said Garcia, who made birdies on each of the two par 5s and one of the par 3s on the second nine. ''But then I hit two greats in a row for holes 17 and 18. I got a birdie-eagle there, so that settled me a little bit and I could play solid in the back nine and it was a great round.''

Garcia made the shortlist for the Laureus Sports Awards in the Breakthrough of the Year category after claiming his first major at Augusta National last year and is hoping for more success this season.

He credits the Singapore Open as having played a part in toughening him up for his Masters win because he opted to start his 2017 campaign in the stifling humidity of Southeast Asia to prepare himself for the bigger tournaments ahead.

Although he finished tied for 11th in Singapore, Garcia won the Dubai Desert Classic the next week and was in peak form when he won the Masters two months later.

Kitayama only secured his place in the $1 million event on Monday by finishing at the top of the qualifying competition, but he made a strong start with birdies on three of his first five holes. The 25-year-old Thai was 6 under through 13 holes but spoiled his otherwise flawless round with a bogey on his last.

''I started with a birdie and I just let it roll from there. I had some good tee shots, which I think, is the biggest thing for this course,'' Kitayama said. ''I'm a little tired, but I'm hanging in there. Whenever I have time off, I'll try not to think too much about golf.''

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13-year-old beats DJ in closest-to-the-pin contest

By Ryan LavnerJanuary 18, 2018, 12:26 pm

Dustin Johnson didn’t just get beat by Tommy Fleetwood and Rory McIlroy on Day 1 of the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship.

Even a 13-year-old got the best of the world No. 1.

Oscar Murphy teed off on the 177-yard 15th hole as part of the tournament’s Beat the Pro challenge during the opening round. The Northern Irishman, one of the HSBC’s Future Falcons, carved a 3-wood toward a back-right pin, about 25 feet away, closer than both Johnson and Fleetwood.

“An unbelievable shot,” Fleetwood said afterward, “and me and Rory both said, ‘We don’t have that in our locker.’”



Johnson still made par on the hole, but he mixed four birdies with four bogeys Thursday for an even-par 72 that left him six shots back of Fleetwood and Hideto Tanihara after the opening round.

Johnson, who tied for second here a year ago, is coming off a dominant performance at the Sentry Tournament of Champions, where he won by eight shots to strengthen his lead atop the world rankings. 

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McIlroy 'really pleased' with opening 69 in Abu Dhabi

By Ryan LavnerJanuary 18, 2018, 12:10 pm

It was an auspicious 2018 debut for Rory McIlroy.

Playing alongside world No. 1 Dustin Johnson for his first round since October, McIlroy missed only one green and shot a bogey-free 69 at the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship. McIlroy is three shots back of reigning Race to Dubai champion Tommy Fleetwood, who played in the same group as McIlroy and Johnson, and Hideto Tanihara.

Starting on the back nine at Abu Dhabi Golf Club, McIlroy began with 11 consecutive pars before birdies on Nos. 3, 7 and 8.


Full-field scores from the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship


“I was excited to get going,” he told reporters afterward. “The last couple of months have been really nice in terms of being able to concentrate on things I needed to work on in my game and health-wise. I feel like I’m the most prepared for a season that I’ve ever been, but it was nice to get back out there.”

Fleetwood, the defending champion, raced out to another lead while McIlroy and Johnson, who shot 72, just tried to keep pace.

“Tommy played very well and I was just trying to hang onto his coattails for most of the round, so really pleased – bogey-free 69, I can’t really complain,” McIlroy said.

This was his first competitive round in more than three months, since a tie for 63rd at the Dunhill Links. He is outside the top 10 in the world ranking for the first time since 2014.