The top 10 greatest shots to win a major

By Randall MellApril 11, 2012, 7:10 pm

Our minds are like filing cabinets.

It doesn’t matter whether we are tasting a vintage wine for the first time, or we’ve just finished a terrific book, or we are marveling at some mountain vista, we rifle through our memory looking to compare just how great the experience was. Is it the best glass of wine we’ve ever consumed? The best book we’ve ever read? The most magnificent view we have ever witnessed? It’s the same thing with Bubba Watson’s great escape from the trees right of the 10th fairway at Augusta National Sunday, his terrific recovery shot that helped him win the Masters.

In the history of great shots that helped win major championships, where does Watson’s shot rank?

It’s brutal work, narrowing down spectacular plays in majors. There’s no avoiding leaving some grand shots off the list, but it makes for great debate at the 19th hole or the water cooler.

So, here’s our take:

1. Gene Sarazen’s double eagle at the 1935 Masters

Wow factor: A double eagle is rarer than a hole-in-one, so pulling off that shot in the final round of a Masters’ victory ranks as the most staggering feat in major championship history. It was called “the shot heard ‘round the world.”

The lowdown: Sarazen holed a 4-wood from 235 yards at Augusta National’s 15th hole, erasing a three-shot deficit with a single swing. Notably, he was playing alongside his rival, Walter Hagen. Sarazen went on that Sunday to defeat Craig Wood in a playoff.


2. Tom Watson’s chip-in at the 1982 U.S. Open

Wow factor: Given Watson was tied for the lead with Jack Nicklaus, who already was in the clubhouse, the combination of nerve and touch it took to hole out from the deep rough behind the 17th green that Sunday at Pebble Beach makes Watson’s shot the most clutch chip in major championship history.

The lowdown: Watson drilled a 2-iron over the 17th green into the deep grass just off the putting surface, sending a buzz through the galleries at Pebble Beach. The mistake made it look like Nicklaus would win. Watson had more than the thick rough to navigate. He had a slippery downhill patch of green. Caddie Bruce Edwards famously told Watson to “Get it close.” Watson, more famously, told him, “I’m gonna make it.” Watson did, rattling an improbable birdie off the flagstick on his way to winning.


3. Larry Mize’s chip-in at the 1987 Masters

Wow factor: Mize was the classic underdog, the hometown Augusta boy who used to work the Masters’ leaderboards in his youth. That Mize, winner of just one PGA Tour event to that date, would knock off two of the titans of the time, Seve Ballesteros and Greg Norman, in a playoff added to the fairy-tale appeal of his chip-in to win at the second playoff hole (No. 11).

The lowdown: With Ballesteros eliminated at the first playoff hole, Mize took down Norman a hole later, improbably holing a 140-foot chip with a sand wedge from right of the 11th green to win.


4. Ben Hogan’s 1-iron at the 1950 U.S. Open

Wow factor: The fact that Hogan limped his way around Merion just 16 months after he was nearly killed in a head-on collision with a bus magnifies the dramatic nature of the shot that helped him win the U.S. Open.

The lowdown: Needing a par at the 72nd hole, with a stiff wind in his face, Hogan plucked a 1-iron from his bag. A 1-iron was notoriously difficult to control, but Hogan carved a wondrous shot into the 18th green, setting up a two-putt par that got him into a playoff he would win against Lloyd Mangrum and George Fazio.


5. Bob Tway’s bunker shot at the 1986 PGA Championship

Wow factor: All tied with Greg Norman going to the 72nd hole at Inverness, Tway looked doomed flying his approach into the sand aside the 18th green. He faced a bunker shot onto a treacherously quick green that sloped away from him. The delicate nature of the play under pressure added to the stunning quality of the unexpected hole out.

The lowdown: Nestling his bunker shot to a landing spot just a foot onto the green, Tway watched his shot gently roll into the hole. The excitement turned him into a human pogo stick as he leaped up and down in that bunker. Norman missed his chip and chance to force a playoff, making Tway the first player in modern history to win the PGA Championship with a birdie at the 72nd hole.


6. Tiger Woods’ chip-in at the 2005 Masters

Wow factor: After pulling his approach long and left of the 16th green that Sunday at Augusta National, Woods looked like he was going to have trouble getting up and down for par. A birdie didn’t seem possible from there.

The lowdown: A shot ahead, Woods ignited an explosion around the 16th when he chipped up onto the swale that makes that green so difficult, his ball taking a circuitous route to one of the most unlikely chip-ins in major championship history. Woods needed that birdie as he finished with back-to-back bogeys but still prevailed against Chris DiMarco in a playoff.


7. Jerry Pate’s 5-iron at the 1976 U.S. Open

Wow factor: Just 22 years old, Pate needed all his brashness and confidence to pull off a difficult shot from 190 yards out, from the rough, over a lake. He delivered a shot that made veterans marvel.

The lowdown: With a one-shot lead, Pate just missed the 18th fairway with a drive to right. Under enormous pressure, Pate knew a 4-iron would cover the distance with his normal swing, but his caddie, John Considine, warned they were faced with a flyer lie. So Pate decided on a 5-iron, instead, and he delivered a straight and true shot over all that wet trouble to within 2 feet to set up a closing birdie and seal his victory. “It was the highest, softest flyer you’ve ever seen,” Pate said.


8. Shaun Micheel’s 7-iron at the 2003 PGA Championship

Wow factor: A relative unknown, there were plenty of doubts whether Micheel could close the deal as he headed to the 18th hole that Sunday at Oak Hill. Nicklaus, Hogan or Woods couldn’t have delivered a better answer with a final full shot to win the PGA Championship.

The lowdown: With  a one-shot lead on Chad Campbell, Micheel missed the 18th fairway left, but from 175 yards out, he put the surest pass on a 7-iron he could muster, carving his approach shot to 2 inches to set up a closing birdie and claim the victory.


9. Phil Mickelson’s 6-iron at the 2010 Masters

Wow factor: Mickelson took a risky play at the 13th hole on that Sunday that could have made him repeat the line he uttered after blowing a shot off a hospitality tent to the lose the U.S. Open at Winged Foot in 2006: “I’m such an idiot,” he said in Winged Foot’s aftermath. Instead, Mickelson showed his genius.

The lowdown: It may not have been the high percentage shot, or the smartest shot, but it was a great shot. From the trees right of the 13th fairway, from 207 yards off pine straw, Mickelson threaded a narrow gap between a pair of trees to hit the green and set up a two-putt birdie that gave him the confidence and momentum he needed to finish off his victory there.


10. Bubba Watson’s gap wedge at the 2012 Masters

Wow factor: Under pressure at the second hole of a playoff, Watson shaped a shot around the trees that would have made Seve Ballesteros’ proud. Watson orchestrated one of the great escapes in major championship history to set up his victory.

The lowdown: After pulling his tee shot right and into the trees along the 10th fairway, Watson’s imagination became the 15th club in his bag. From 155 yards out, he used all his creative powers, slinging a hard hook with a gap wedge around the trees to within 10 feet of the flagstick for a two-putt par to defeat Louis Oosthuizen in a playoff. Watson had to keep the shot low, until it cleared one tree line, then watched it bend and rise to Masters’ fame.

Day (68) just one back at Australian Open

By Nick MentaNovember 24, 2017, 6:40 am

Jason Day posted a second-round 68 to move himself just one off the lead held by Lucas Herbert through two rounds at the Emirates Australian Open. Here’s where things stand after 36 holes in Sydney.

Leaderboard: Herbert (-9), Day (-8), Cameron Davis (-7), Anthony Quayle (-6), Matt Jones (-4), Cameron Smith (-4), Nick Cullen (-4), Richard Green (-4)

What it means: Day is in search of his first worldwide victory of 2017. The former world No. 1 last visited the winner’s circle in May 2016, when he won The Players at TPC Sawgrass. A win this week would close out a difficult year for the Aussie who struggled with his game while also helping his mother in her battle with cancer. Day’s last victory on his native soil came in 2013, when he partnered with Adam Scott to win the World Cup of Golf for Australia at Royal Melbourne.


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Round of the day: Herbert followed an opening 67 with a round of 66 to vault himself into the lead at The Australian Golf Club. He made six birdies, including four on his second nine, against a lone bogey to take the outright lead. The 22-year-old, who held the lead at this event last year and captured low-amateur honors in 2014, is coming off a runner-up finish at the NSW Open Championship, which boosted him from 714th to 429th in the Official World Golf Ranking. His 5-under score was matched by Dale Brandt-Richards and Josh Cabban.

Best of the rest: Matt Jones, who won this event over Jordan Spieth and Adam Scott two years ago, turned in 4-under 67. Jones is best known to American audiences for his playoff victory at the 2014 Shell Houston Open and for holding the 36-hole lead at the 2015 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, which was eventually won by Day. Jones will start the weekend five shots off the lead, at 4 under par.

Biggest disappointment: Spieth has a lot of work to do this weekend if he expects to be in the title picture for the fourth year in a row. Rounds of 70-71 have him eight shots behind the lead held by Herbert. Spieth made a birdie and a bogey on each side Friday to turn in level par. The reigning champion golfer of the year has finished first, second and first at this event over the last three years.

Storyline to watch this weekend: The Australian Open is the first event of the 2018 Open Qualifying Series. The leading three players who finish in the top 10 and who are not otherwise exempt will receive invites into next summer’s Open Championship at Carnoustie.

Ogilvy urges distance rollback of ball

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 8:49 pm

Add Geoff Ogilvy to the chorus of voices calling for a distance rollback of the golf ball.

In an interview before the start of the Emirates Australian Open, Ogilvy said a "time-out" is needed for governing bodies to deal with the issue.

"It's complete nonsense," he said, according to an Australian website. "In my career, it’s gone from 300 yards was a massive hit to you’re a shorter hitter on tour now, legitimately short. It’s changed the way we play great golf courses and that is the crime. It isn’t that the ball goes 400, that’s neither here nor there. It’s the fact the ball going 400 doesn’t makes Augusta work properly, it functions completely wrong.’’


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Ogilvy used an example from American baseball to help get his point across to an Australian audience.

“Major League Baseball in America, they use wooden bats, and everywhere else in baseball they use aluminium bats,’’ he said. “And when the major leaguers use aluminium bats they don’t even have to touch it and it completely destroys their stadiums. It’s just comedy.

“That’s kind of what’s happened to us at least with the drivers of these big hitters; We’ve completely outgrown the stadiums. So do you rebuild every stadium in the world? That’s expensive. Or make the ball go shorter? It seems relatively simple from that perspective.’’

Ogilvy, an Australian who won the 2006 U.S. Open, said he believes there will be a rollback, but admitted it would be a "challenge" for manufacturers to produce a ball that flies shorter for pros but does not lose distance when struck by recreational players.

The golf world celebrates Thanksgiving

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 6:01 pm

Here's a look, through social media, at how the golf world celebrates Thanksgiving.

Lexi Thompson:

Baking time!!

A post shared by Lexi Thompson (@lexi) on

David Feherty:

Jack Nicklaus:

GC Tiger Tracker:

Steve Stricker:

Golf Channel:

Frank Nobilo:

Ian Poulter:

Tyrone Van Aswegen:

Happy Thanksgiving: Biggest turkeys of 2017

By Grill Room TeamNovember 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

Thanksgiving brings us golf's biggest turkeys of the year. Donald Trump, Grayson Murray and a certain (now-former) tournament director headline the list. Click here or on the image below to check out all the turkeys.