Woods, Stricker form friendly, formidable pairing

By Randall MellSeptember 25, 2012, 12:00 pm

The message came through with no translation required.

With the American Ryder Cup team being finalized a few weeks ago, Tiger Woods crossed paths with Steve Stricker.

“Hey bud,” Woods told Stricker. “You know, there’s no way I’m playing with you at the Ryder Cup, so you better find somebody else to play with.”

Stricker loved it. In Woods’ code, he knew exactly what that meant. He knew it meant that Woods was fired up about partnering with him again when the Americans meet the Europeans at Medinah just outside Chicago this week.


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U.S. captain Davis Love III hasn’t announced his pairings publicly yet, but it will be an upset if Woods and Stricker aren’t back together for fourballs and foursomes.

Woods and Stricker have become the most formidable American pairing in international team matches today, and they both have some special mojo working in Chicago.

Woods has won two PGA Championships at Medinah and owns five other BMW/Western Open titles in suburban Chicago.

Stricker couldn’t have been more motivated to make this Ryder Cup team. It’s being played practically in his backyard. A Wisconsin native raised in Edgerton just a couple hours north of Chicago, Stricker played at the University of Illinois. He’s revered among Illini followers. He won the Western Open in ’96 and is a three-time winner of the John Deere Classic in Silvis, Ill. Stricker’s so beloved there, they gave away bobbleheads with his likeness at this year’s John Deere Classic.

As a golf partnership, Woods and Stricker were an instant hit when U.S. Presidents Cup captain Fred Couples first put them together at Harding Park three years ago. They rolled to a 4-0 mark with Couples never separating them.

“We really gel together,” Woods said of that first union.

At the last Ryder Cup in Wales, they teamed to go 2-1, once again never separating for the partnered events in the rain-adjusted schedule.

They’re 6-2 overall as partners in team events.

“Tiger and Stricker have had great success,” Love said. “I wouldn’t want to play against them, for sure.”

As an assistant captain in Wales, Love got to see the chemistry between Woods and Stricker on uncomfortable foreign turf.

“Steve’s said Tiger makes him feel comfortable,” Love said. “Well, you know what? I think Steve makes Tiger feel comfortable, and that's what you want. You want those guys to both be comfortable with the pairing.”

After Stricker was announced as the winner of the Payne Stewart Award at the Tour Championship last week, Woods sought him out and hugged him on the driving range.

This shapes up as a pivotal Ryder Cup for Woods because the event is so at odds with the rest of his terrific resume.

By the end of his career, Woods may go down as the most prolific winner in PGA Tour history. Yet, if the Americans lose the Ryder Cup this week, he may be on his way to being remembered as the biggest loser in American Ryder Cup annals.

This will mark Woods’ seventh Ryder Cup appearance, but he has played on just one winning team, at Brookline 13 years ago.

Woods is trying to avoid a fifth consecutive loss in the event. No American has played on five consecutive losing teams in Ryder Cup history.

“We didn't play well at the right time, and that's just the way it goes,” Woods said. “Hopefully, this year we'll play well at the right time.”

Woods is 13-14-2 in Ryder Cup play with most of his trouble coming in partnered matches. He’s 4-1-1 in singles. Throw out his partnerships with Stricker, and Woods is 3-6-1 in foursomes and 4-6 in fourballs.

Why the struggle with partners?

There are theories.

“In the early days, it was like Tiger going to the dentist,” NBC’s Johnny Miller said. “He wanted a good outcome, but nothing he looked forward to too much.

“The second part was he was so intimidating, he would intimidate his own partner, just because his aura was so amazing. It's changed. I think he's softened with Stricker and a little bit with Furyk, and I think now he's going to be a lot better team player than he was in the early days.”

Another theory was that Woods is less programmed for team competition.

“I don't know that Tiger's mindset as a golfer – how would you put this? – really lends itself to team play,” NBC’s Roger Maltbie said.  “Johnny has referred to it many, many times: The lone wolf mentality. I think that certainly is a quality that Tiger has as much or more than anybody I've ever witnessed.

“Tiger is his own entity, and I think mixing into a team format was difficult for him. I don't read too much into who is a good partner for Tiger or who is a bad partner for Tiger. I think it had more to do with how he viewed the game, how he approached the game, how he approached his career, what he wanted from the game. I think that’s changed as he’s gone along.”

Stricker didn’t play on those early Woods’ teams. Stricker played his first Ryder Cup with Woods in 2010, his first Presidents Cup with him in 2009.

Asked about Woods’ team struggles, Stricker shrugs his shoulders.

“I don’t know,” Stricker said. “He has been as much a team player as anybody when I have been part of these teams. At every one of them, he was trying to win. I’ve been paired with him, and he is as fired up as anyone. He’s so competitive. He doesn’t like to lose at anything. It’s why he has won 74 times on the PGA Tour. I think it’s all important to him.”

Woods’ camaraderie with fellow players has been noticeably on display the last couple years. It goes way beyond the friendship with Rory McIlroy. Back at the WGC-Bridgestone, South African Branden Grace was paired for the first time with Woods. Grace called Woods “the nicest guy I’ve ever played with.”

That’s pretty much what most PGA Tour pros will tell you about Stricker.

Stricker was presented this year’s Payne Stewart Award for his respect of the game’s traditions, his charitable work and professionalism. The award is a testament to his standing in the game beyond his 12 PGA Tour titles.

Stricker, 45, and Woods, 36, are golf’s odd couple. Stricker’s the humble, Midwestern boy who frequently tears up with emotion and who slumped so badly in his career he was twice named Comeback Player of the Year. Woods is the California kid who became a superstar, the son of a U.S. Army Special Forces war veteran with his own affection for military life.

As teammates, though, Woods sees more similarities than differences with Stricker.

They’re both terrific putters, and Woods says they plot their way around courses similarly.

“I think we approach the game the same way, with the same mentality,” Woods said. “We just play it differently. I hit the ball a little bit further, but our mentality and how we play and how we compete is exactly the same.”

Stricker has a special gift for uniting unlikely forces.

As a Wisconsin boy, he’s a Chicago Bears fan. He also has that University of Illinois degree. Uniting folks from Wisconsin and Illinois over any cause is quite the trick, but you’ll see them united in support of Stricker at Medinah.

Stricker says he never saw this partnership with Woods coming way back in ’97 when he played with Woods for the first time at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am.

Though Stricker was coming off two wins in ’96 and a fourth-place finish on the PGA Tour money list, he was blown away seeing Woods’ superior gifts in that first pairing.

“I didn’t play well,” Stricker said. “I could see this guy was really good. I just thought he was at a different level than I was, and he always has been, and I’m fine with that. I think it just took me awhile to get to the point of feeling comfortable around him.”

Stricker didn’t really get to know Woods well until the start of the FedEx Cup in 2009. They began the playoffs with Woods No. 1 in FedEx Cup points and Stricker No. 2. They played the first two rounds of The Barclays together and the first two rounds of the Deutsche Bank Championship together. They struck up a friendship that led them to wonder how they would pair together for the upcoming Presidents Cup that year.

“It was kind of like trying to get a girlfriend in high school,” Stricker joked.

Woods told Couples he would like a Stricker pairing, and Stricker told Couples the same. And Couples put them together.

Stricker thinks it works for him because he is long past trying to compare himself with Woods.

“Tiger does extraordinary things that nobody else does,” Stricker said. “You just have to say, `That’s OK, that’s him.’ But I do some things that are good. I can’t drive it as far as Tiger does, or hit those towering irons way up in the air, but I can do other little things that make up for it. That’s what has given me the confidence to go out and play with some of these guys and be comfortable around them. I’m old enough, I’ve been around enough, that I feel OK about the differences.”

Woods and Stricker may have different demeanors, but their approaches both work well in match play. Woods won those three consecutive U.S. Junior and three consecutive U.S. Amateur titles and won the WGC-Accenture Match Play Championship three times. Stricker also won the Accenture Match Play Championship in 2001. Stricker’s match-play grit is so respected that the Americans sent him out first to lead off singles at Wales two years ago and he beat a red-hot Lee Westwood.

Woods and Stricker both won three points in a losing cause for the Americans in Wales.

 “I never saw this kind of pairing coming after that first time Tiger and I played together, the way we mesh together so well,” Stricker said. “I don’t even know why, but we get along really well. I respect him.”

The mutual respect should make them tough team to beat this week.


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Day (68) just one back at Australian Open

By Nick MentaNovember 24, 2017, 6:40 am

Jason Day posted a second-round 68 to move himself just one off the lead held by Lucas Herbert through two rounds at the Emirates Australian Open. Here’s where things stand after 36 holes in Sydney.

Leaderboard: Herbert (-9), Day (-8), Cameron Davis (-7), Anthony Quayle (-6), Matt Jones (-4), Cameron Smith (-4), Nick Cullen (-4), Richard Green (-4)

What it means: Day is in search of his first worldwide victory of 2017. The former world No. 1 last visited the winner’s circle in May 2016, when he won The Players at TPC Sawgrass. A win this week would close out a difficult year for the Aussie who struggled with his game while also helping his mother in her battle with cancer. Day’s last victory on his native soil came in 2013, when he partnered with Adam Scott to win the World Cup of Golf for Australia at Royal Melbourne.


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Round of the day: Herbert followed an opening 67 with a round of 66 to vault himself into the lead at The Australian Golf Club. He made six birdies, including four on his second nine, against a lone bogey to take the outright lead. The 22-year-old, who held the lead at this event last year and captured low-amateur honors in 2014, is coming off a runner-up finish at the NSW Open Championship, which boosted him from 714th to 429th in the Official World Golf Ranking. His 5-under score was matched by Dale Brandt-Richards and Josh Cabban.

Best of the rest: Matt Jones, who won this event over Jordan Spieth and Adam Scott two years ago, turned in 4-under 67. Jones is best known to American audiences for his playoff victory at the 2014 Shell Houston Open and for holding the 36-hole lead at the 2015 PGA Championship at Whistling Straits, which was eventually won by Day. Jones will start the weekend five shots off the lead, at 4 under par.

Biggest disappointment: Spieth has a lot of work to do this weekend if he expects to be in the title picture for the fourth year in a row. Rounds of 70-71 have him eight shots behind the lead held by Herbert. Spieth made a birdie and a bogey on each side Friday to turn in level par. The reigning champion golfer of the year has finished first, second and first at this event over the last three years.

Storyline to watch this weekend: The Australian Open is the first event of the 2018 Open Qualifying Series. The leading three players who finish in the top 10 and who are not otherwise exempt will receive invites into next summer’s Open Championship at Carnoustie.

Ogilvy urges distance rollback of ball

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 8:49 pm

Add Geoff Ogilvy to the chorus of voices calling for a distance rollback of the golf ball.

In an interview before the start of the Emirates Australian Open, Ogilvy said a "time-out" is needed for governing bodies to deal with the issue.

"It's complete nonsense," he said, according to an Australian website. "In my career, it’s gone from 300 yards was a massive hit to you’re a shorter hitter on tour now, legitimately short. It’s changed the way we play great golf courses and that is the crime. It isn’t that the ball goes 400, that’s neither here nor there. It’s the fact the ball going 400 doesn’t makes Augusta work properly, it functions completely wrong.’’


Full-field scores from the Emirates Australian Open


Ogilvy used an example from American baseball to help get his point across to an Australian audience.

“Major League Baseball in America, they use wooden bats, and everywhere else in baseball they use aluminium bats,’’ he said. “And when the major leaguers use aluminium bats they don’t even have to touch it and it completely destroys their stadiums. It’s just comedy.

“That’s kind of what’s happened to us at least with the drivers of these big hitters; We’ve completely outgrown the stadiums. So do you rebuild every stadium in the world? That’s expensive. Or make the ball go shorter? It seems relatively simple from that perspective.’’

Ogilvy, an Australian who won the 2006 U.S. Open, said he believes there will be a rollback, but admitted it would be a "challenge" for manufacturers to produce a ball that flies shorter for pros but does not lose distance when struck by recreational players.

The golf world celebrates Thanksgiving

By Golf Channel DigitalNovember 23, 2017, 6:01 pm

Here's a look, through social media, at how the golf world celebrates Thanksgiving.

Lexi Thompson:

Baking time!!

A post shared by Lexi Thompson (@lexi) on

David Feherty:

Jack Nicklaus:

GC Tiger Tracker:

Steve Stricker:

Golf Channel:

Frank Nobilo:

Ian Poulter:

Tyrone Van Aswegen:

Happy Thanksgiving: Biggest turkeys of 2017

By Grill Room TeamNovember 23, 2017, 3:00 pm

Thanksgiving brings us golf's biggest turkeys of the year. Donald Trump, Grayson Murray and a certain (now-former) tournament director headline the list. Click here or on the image below to check out all the turkeys.