Cut Line: Do what you Love

By Rex HoggardOctober 19, 2012, 8:56 pm

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – They call it “island time” in this slice of the Golden Isles, a gentle, languid pace that moves with all the urgency of swaying moss – and the golf seems to have taken a cue from the laidback landscape this week.

From McGladrey Classic host Davis Love III’s measured return to normalcy, to the U.S. Golf Association’s slow slide toward a resolution on the long putter debate, Cut Line goes off the clock for this week’s edition.


Made Cut

More than a caddie. There are no caddies in the World Golf Hall of Fame but let Cut Line be the first, or 10th, to unofficially nominate looping legend Fanny Sunesson for induction.

No, Sunesson never hit a shot that mattered, never holed a winning putt, never held a lead at a major championship, but as news surfaced this week that she has retired from the caddie yard because of an ailing back Henrik Stenson, her boss until late last year, put her worth in context.

“Her knowledge, her preparation, the way she carried herself on the golf course, you knew that if you didn’t have a piece of information, no one else in the field had it,” Stenson said. “When she was with me I always felt comfortable and she stayed with me the whole time, even when I wasn’t playing well. We were always a team.”

Sunesson’s resume would certainly be St. Augustine, Fla., ready, with four major championship victories with Nick Faldo along with the 2009 Players Championship and 2007 WGC-Accenture Match Play with Stenson.

And if all that wasn’t enough, imagine the induction party. Caddies always throw the best parties.

Tweet of the week: @NickFaldo006 (Nick Faldo) “As we strode down the 14th fairway (at the) Open in 1990 two (shots) ahead, to break the tension Fanny asks, ‘Are you thinking of getting a dog?’”

Moving on from Medinah. Late Thursday night, hours after he’d signed for a first-round 65 at The McGladrey Classic, Davis Love III was putting the finishing touches on a party for Tour players and their families at his home when someone asked his plans for Friday morning?

“Paddle boarding,” he smiled, however wearily.

It would have been easy, and perfectly understandable, for Love to go “underground” in the wake of last month’s Ryder Cup loss (there is still an APB out for Hal Sutton), but that’s not really his style.

Instead Love played the next two events after Medinah and arrived home to St. Simons Island this week with a full plate of hosting duties, including his final policy board meeting as a player director during Monday and Tuesday’s pairings party at his house.

The full slate was probably helpful considering America’s Sunday collapse at Medinah. “(Zach Johnson) asked if I was over the Ryder Cup yet and I said, ‘No, I don’t think I’ll ever get over it.’ It was so much fun to be part of that team,” Love said on Thursday.

Love will always be “that captain” to middle America, but to so many others he is much more than the sum of his Medinah parts.


Made Cut-Did Not Finish (MDF)

A true farm system. The PGA Tour seemed to inch closer to a more detailed development system this week with news that the Canadian Tour would become the PGA Tour Canada, complete with access to the Web.com Tour for the circuit’s top players.

Like the PGA Tour Latinoamérica, which debuted this year, the top 5 players from the Canada circuit’s money list will graduate to the Web.com Tour and the next five will receive exemptions to the final stage of Q-School.

It is curious, however, that an organization that once seemed void of an atlas, (considering that three of the four World Golf Championships are played within the confines of the Lower 48) has forgotten that charity starts at home.

The global development of the game is encouraging, but what of the thousands of young American golfers who would welcome the same chance as their colleagues in South America and Canada?

For American college players who don’t ace their first Q-School test, the alternative is a year north or south of the border. Give the Tour credit for growing the game, but it just seems like they missed a step along the way.

The long journey for long putters.The U.S. Golf Association and Royal & Ancient Golf Club seem to be inching toward a resolution on long putters, and anchoring.

On Monday USGA executive director Mike Davis made a presentation to the Tour’s Policy Board at Sea Island. Although an official statement from the USGA suggests that the ruling bodies are still deliberating on the issue, one source who attended Monday’s meeting told Cut Line that “they’ve made up their mind (to ban) and just want someone to agree with them.”

An announcement is still expected before the end of the year, but we’d like to offer a little advice – when removing Band-Aids it’s best to be quick about it.


Missed Cut

Left field. During a conference call earlier this week, officials for the Tiger Woods World Challenge noted that this year’s field would feature 13 Ryder Cup players, which prompted one golf scribe to ask, “You couldn’t talk Phil (Mickelson) into playing?”

Without pause Woods deadpanned, “It was his decision.” Rarely does Tiger offer so much insight with such an economy of words.

Earlier this year Woods raised some media eyebrows when word spread that Mickelson tried to arrange a pre-Masters practice round at Augusta National with the world No. 2 but Woods declined.

Some viewed the invitation as a peace offering to thaw what is widely considered an icy relationship, but if Lefty really wanted to make nice he would make the drive up the SoCal coast and play the World Challenge for the first time since 2002.

A Mickey Mouse moment. According to one source who has seen the tentative 2013-2014 schedule, the Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals Classic is not on next year’s calendar.

Although there is still time, and according to tournament officials a desire, to round up a new sponsor for next season, removing Disney from its status as the final regular-season event removes a level of prestige that came along with it. Not to mention an added expense with the former fall series events forced to increase their purses to FedEx Cup levels ($6 million), all making the “Happiest Place on Earth” a much more difficult sell.

“We’ve decided the best thing is to put all of our focus on the 2012 event, and after that we will look to the future,” Disney tournament director Kevin Weickel said this week.

Perhaps this is no more than economic Darwinism, but losing a Tour stop that’s been around since 1971 would be like, well, standing in line at Space Mountain for an hour.

Els honored with Heisman Humanitarian Award

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 10, 2017, 11:41 pm

The annual Heisman Trophy award ceremony is one of the biggest moments in any football season, but there was a touching non-football moment as well on Saturday night as Ernie Els received the Heisman Humanitarian Award.

The award, which had been announced in August, recognized Els' ongoing efforts on behalf of his Els for Autism foundation. Els received the award at Manhattan's PlayStation Theater, where Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield won the Heisman Trophy.

Els, 47, founded Els for Autism in 2009 with his wife after their son, Ben, was diagnosed with autism. Their efforts have since flourished into a 26-acre campus in Jupiter, Fla., and the creation of the Els Center for Excellence in 2015.

The Heisman Humanitarian Award has been given out since 2006. Past recipients include NBA center David Robinson, NFL running back Warrick Dunn, soccer star Mia Hamm and NASCAR driver Jeff Gordon.

A native of South Africa, Els won the U.S. Open in 1994 and 1997 and The Open in 2002 and 2012. He has won 19 times on the PGA Tour and was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 2011.

Getty Images

Monday finish for Joburg Open; Sharma leads by 4

By Golf Channel DigitalDecember 10, 2017, 8:57 pm

Rain, lightning and hail pushed the Joburg Open to a Monday finish, with India’s Shubhankar Sharma holding a four-stroke lead with 11 holes to play in Johannesburg.

Play is scheduled to resume at 7:30 a.m. local time.

South Africa’s Erik van Rooyen will have a 3-foot putt for birdie to move within three shots of Sharma wen play resumes at the Randpark Golf Club. Sarma is at 22 under par.

Tapio Pulkkanen of Finland and James Morrison of England are tied for third at 14 under. Pulkkanen has 10 holes remaining, Morrison 11.

The top three finishers who are not already exempt, will get spots in next year’s Open Championship at Carnoustie.

 

 

Stricker, O'Hair team to win QBE Shootout

By Will GrayDecember 10, 2017, 8:55 pm

It may not count in the official tally, but Steve Stricker is once again in the winner's circle on the PGA Tour.

Stricker teamed with Sean O'Hair to win the two-person QBE Shootout, as the duo combined for a better-ball 64 in the final round to finish two shots clear of Graeme McDowell and Shane Lowry. It's the second win in this event for both men; Stricker won with Jerry Kelly back in 2009 while O'Hair lifted the trophy with Kenny Perry in 2012.

Stricker and O'Hair led wire-to-wire in the 54-hole, unofficial event after posting a 15-under 57 during the opening-round scramble.

"We just really gelled well together," Stricker said. "With his length the first day, getting some clubs into the greens, some short irons for me, we just fed off that first day quite a bit. We felt comfortable with one another."


Full-field scores from the QBE Shootout


Stricker won 12 times during his PGA Tour career, most recently at the 2012 Tournament of Champions. More recently the 50-year-old has been splitting his time on the PGA Tour Champions and captained the U.S. to a victory at the Presidents Cup in October. O'Hair has four official Tour wins, most recently at the 2011 RBC Canadian Open.

Pat Perez and Brian Harman finished alone in third, four shots behind Stricker and O'Hair. Lexi Thompson and Tony Finau, the lone co-ed pairing in the 12-team event, finished among a tie for fourth.

Getty Images

Wie takes shot at LPGA dress code in crop top

By Grill Room TeamDecember 10, 2017, 5:33 pm

The new LPGA dress code got mixed reviews when it was announced in July, and Michelle Wie is taking full advantage of her offseason with no restrictions.

The 28-year-old former U.S. Women's Open champion is keeping her game sharp while back in her home state of Hawaii, but couldn't help taking a shot at the rules while doing it, posting a photo to Instagram of her playing golf in a crop top with the caption, "Offseason = No dress code fine."

Offseason = No dress code fines #croptopdroptop

A post shared by Michelle Wie (@themichellewie) on

Wie isn't the first to voice her displeasure with the rules. Lexi Thompson posted a similar photo and caption to Instagram shortly after the policy was announced.