Georgia On a Roll at Mens NCAA Finals

By Sports NetworkJune 3, 2005, 4:00 pm
College CentralEditor's Note: Exclusive coverage of the Men's NCAA Division I Golf Championships will be televised on The Golf Channel beginning June 2 at 3:00 p.m. ET.
 
NCAAOWINGS MILLS, Md. -- Georgia's David Denham shot a 2-over 72 and three teammates finished at 5 over in Friday's third round, helping the Bulldogs maintain a nine-stroke lead after three rounds of the NCAA Division I tournament.
 
'We just had to get in without any major damage,' Georgia coach Chris Haack said. 'We bumped our toe at the end, 6 over on the last two holes, but it was a good job overall.'
 
Georgia had a 17-over 297 total on Friday - counting the top four scores from the five-player squad - to finish at 15-over 855 on the Caves Valley course. Chris Kirk, Brendon Todd and Richard Scott each had a 5-over 75.
 
Georgia Tech, 15 over in the third round, was 24 over, followed by Southern California at 35 over and UNLV at 36 over. Duke, Arizona State, Washington, Kentucky and Augusta State were tied at 37 over.
 
Pepperdine's Michael Putnam topped the individual leaderboard, shooting a 73 for a three-round total of 3-under 207. Georgia Tech's Roberto Castro (71) and Augusta State's Major Manning (73) were a stroke back. Kentucky's John Holmes (69) and Georgia Southern's Aron Price (72) were at 1 over.
 
After Friday's round, the field was cut to the top 15 teams and six individuals, including Putnam, Missouri's Shawn Jasper (1 over), Stanford's Rob Grube (3 over) and Oregon's Gregg LaVoie (6 over). Wake Forest's Sean Moore, Tulsa's Mitch Cohlmia and Arizona's Nathan Lashley were tied at 7 over and will meet in a playoff to fill the final two individual spots.
 
Defending champion Ryan Moore of UNLV, also the 2004 U.S. Amateur and U.S. Public Links winner, had a 71 and was at 6-over 216. New Mexico's Spencer Levin, who tied for 13th last year in the U.S. Open, was at 8-over 218 after a 71 in the third round.
 
Team Scores
1. Georgia 274-284-297-855 +15 
 
2. Georgia Tech 288-281-295-864 +24
 
3. Southern California 290-282-303-875 +35
 
4. UNLV 284-290-302-876 +36
 
5 . Duke 288-286-303-877 +37
 
5 . Arizona State 291-285-301-877 +37
 
5 . Washington 289-285-303-877 +37
 
5 . Kentucky 291-292-294-877 +37
 
5 . Augusta State 286-289-302-877 +37
 
10 . Georgia State 287-287-305-879 +39
 
10 . Brigham Young 285-290-304-879 +39
 
12 . New Mexico 289-300-291-880 +40
 
12 . Tennessee 279-288-313-880 +40
 
14. Oklahoma State 292-289-301-882 +42
 
15. Georgia Southern 286-298-299-883 +43
 

Missed Cut
 
16. Wake Forest 287-293-304-884 +44
 
17. Arizona 282-296-307-885 +45
 
18 . Florida 289-291-308-888 +48
 
18 . Stanford 296-292-300-888 +48
 
20 . Missouri 300-286-304-890 +50
 
20 . Coastal Carolina 284-301-305-890 +50
 
22. SMU 287-297-308-892 +52
 
23. San Diego State 290-297-306-893 +53
 
24 . Texas 298-297-299-894 +54
 
24 . Texas A&M 296-296-302-894 +54
 
24 . Arkansas 288-296-310-894 +54
 
27. Purdue 299-299-297-895 +55
 
28. Alabama 291-293-313-897 +57
 
29. Tulsa 290-302-307-899 +59
 
30. UCLA 299-301-303-903 +63
 

 
Individuals
 
1. Michael Putnam, Pepperdine 67-67-73-207 -3
 
2. Roberto Castro, Georgia Tech 69-68-71-208 -2
 
2. Major Manning, Augusta State 65-70-73-208 -2
 
4. John Holmes, Kentucky 70-72-69-211 +1
 
4. Aron Price, Georgia Southern 66-73-72-211 +1
 
6. Taylor Wood, Southern California 72-68-72-212 +2
 
6. Joshua Wooding, Southern California 71-68-73-212 +2
 
8. Oscar Alvarez, Brigham Young 67-71-75-213 +3
 
8. Shawn Jasper, Missouri 72-66-75-213 +3
 
8. James Lepp, Washington 70-67-76-213 +3
 
8. Ross McGowan, Tennessee 67-71-75-213 +3
 
8. Brendon Todd, Georgia 68-70-75-213 +3
 
13. Rob Grube, Stanford 71-71-72-214 +4
 
14. Chris Kirk, Georgia 69-71-75-215 +5
 
14. Kevin Kisner, Georgia 65-74-76-215 +5
 
14. Michael Schachner, Duke 70-68-77-215 +5
 
17. Alejandro Canizares, Arizona State 73-71-72-216 +6
 
17. Kalle Edberg, Augusta State 71-74-71-216 +6
 
17. y-Gregg LaVoie, Oregon 72-72-72-216 +6
 
17. Niklas Lemke, Arizona State 70-70-76-216 +6
 
17. Ryan Moore, UNLV 72-73-71-216 +6
 
17. Alex Noren, Oklahoma State 70-69-77-216 +6
 
17. David Palm, Georgia Southern 70-74-72-216 +6
 
17. Richard Scott, Georgia 72-69-75-216 +6
 
25. Mitch Cohlmia, Tulsa 67-75-75-217 +7
 
25. Ryan Keeney, UNLV 69-75-73-217 +7
 
25. Nathan Lashley, Arizona 71-71-75-217 +7
 
25. Sean Moore, Wake Forest 69-75-73-217 +7
 
29. David Denham, Georgia 72-74-72-218 +8
 
29. Robert Gates, Texas A&M 68-73-77-218 +8
 
29. Beau Glover, Arkansas 70-71-77-218 +8
 
29. Spencer Levin, New Mexico 72-75-71-218 +8
 
29. Zack Miller, Stanford 70-69-79-218 +8
 
29. Erik Olson, Washington 74-69-75-218 +8
 
29. Brett Stegmaier, Florida 74-71-73-218 +8
 
36. Michael Barbosa, Georgia Tech 71-72-76-219 +9
 
36. Ryan Blaum, Duke 70-73-76-219 +9
 
36. Greg Machtaler, Brigham Young 74-71-74-219 +9
 
36. Joel Sjoholm, Georgia State 73-69-77-219 +9
 
36. Chan Song, Georgia Tech 73-72-74-219 +9
 
36. Steve Tiley, Georgia State 71-72-76-219 +9
 
42. y-Rhys Davies, East Tennessee St. 75-74-71-220 +10
 
42. Will Dodson, SMU 69-76-75-220 +10
 
42. Andres Gonzales, UNLV 70-73-77-220 +10
 
42. Mark Harrell, Alabama 70-72-78-220 +10
 
42. Chris Heintz, UCLA 74-74-72-220 +10
 
42. Doug Manchester, Wake Forest 71-71-78-220 +10
 
42. Pablo Martin, Oklahoma State 72-74-74-220 +10
 
42. James Vargas, Florida 67-77-76-220 +10
 
50. Scott Abbott, SMU 71-73-77-221 +11
 
50. Zack Byrd, Coastal Carolina 72-74-75-221 +11
 
50. Jay Choi, New Mexico 73-75-73-221 +11
 
50. Ron Harvey, Jr., Brigham Young 72-72-77-221 +11
 
50. Ryan Henry, Tulsa 72-76-73-221 +11
 
50. John Kelly, Missouri 74-73-74-221 +11
 
50. Madalitso Muthiya, New Mexico 75-74-72-221 +11
 
50. Philip Pettitt, Tennessee 69-73-79-221 +11
 
50. Michael Quagliano, Duke 76-71-74-221 +11
 
50. Nicholas Thompson, Georgia Tech 75-69-77-221 +11
 
50. Emmett Turner, Augusta State 72-74-75-221 +11
 
61. Mark Blakefield, Kentucky 72-77-73-222 +12
 
61. Matt Bortis, Arkansas 71-78-73-222 +12
 
61. Jerad Harklau, Texas A&M 72-75-75-222 +12
 
61. Ty Harris, Georgia State 72-70-80-222 +12
 
61. Matthew Mills, Texas 73-74-75-222 +12
 
61. Martin Ureta, North Carolina 68-74-80-222 +12
 
67. Aaron Choi, San Diego State 75-76-72-223 +13
 
67. Dustin Johnson, Coastal Carolina 69-79-75-223 +13
 
67. Joe Panzeri, Washington 71-76-76-223 +13
 
67. Andrew Scott, San Diego State 72-74-77-223 +13
 
67. Bradley Shaw, Southern California 72-72-79-223 +13
 
67. Charly Simon, Arizona State 73-73-77-223 +13
 
67. Brandon Waldrop, Kentucky 74-71-78-223 +13
 
74. Bobby Bennett, Purdue 75-75-74-224 +14
 
74. Dustin Cone, Purdue 78-70-76-224 +14
 
74. Josh Esler, Arizona 71-76-77-224 +14
 
74. Miguel Griego, New Mexico 71-76-77-224 +14
 
74. Jake Grodzinsky, Duke 74-74-76-224 +14
 
74. Colt Knost, SMU 73-74-77-224 +14
 
74. Pat Moore, Arizona State 75-73-76-224 +14
 
74. Ryan Posey, Oklahoma State 77-73-74-224 +14
 
74. Peter Richardson, Purdue 73-78-73-224 +14
 
74. Josh Warthen, San Diego State 71-75-78-224 +14
 
74. Matt Wells, Kentucky 75-75-74-224 +14
 
85. Darren Baynes, Georgia State 73-76-76-225 +15
 
85. Kevin Blue, Stanford 76-74-75-225 +15
 
85. y-Judd Easterling, Wichita State 75-73-77-225 +15
 
85. Travis Esway, Arizona 68-75-82-225 +15
 
85. Matt Every, Florida 74-71-80-225 +15
 
85. Kevin Larsen, Georgia Tech 77-74-74-225 +15
 
85. Tyler Leon, Oklahoma State 76-73-76-225 +15
 
85. Chris Mabry, Missouri 75-72-78-225 +15
 
85. Brian Prouty, Arizona 72-75-78-225 +15
 
85. Webb Simpson, Wake Forest 68-78-79-225 +15
 
85. Joseph Sykora, Alabama 74-73-78-225 +15
 
85. Jarred Texter, UNLV 74-70-81-225 +15
 
97. Jake Ellison, Brigham Young 72-76-78-226 +16
 
97. Shaun Goodwin, Texas 77-75-74-226 +16
 
97. Daniel Im, UCLA 75-75-76-226 +16
 
97. Henry Liaw, Arizona 74-75-77-226 +16
 
97. Zack Robinson, Oklahoma State 74-74-78-226 +16
 
97. Gilberto Rodriguez, San Diego State 74-72-80-226 +16
 
97. Ben Taylor, Georgia State 71-79-76-226 +16
 
97. Richard Treis, Florida 74-72-80-226 +16
 
105. Jeff Bell, Texas 78-72-77-227 +17
 
105. Kevin Chappell, UCLA 73-78-76-227 +17
 
105. Pariya Junhasavasdikul, Purdue 74-79-74-227 +17
 
105. Clint Provost, Alabama 73-73-81-227 +17
 
105. Alex Prugh, Washington 76-75-76-227 +17
 
105. Kyle Reifers, Wake Forest 79-74-74-227 +17
 
105. Lindsay Renolds, Coastal Carolina 71-76-80-227 +17
 
105. David Skinns, Tennessee 71-75-81-227 +17
 
105. Nathan Smith, Duke 74-74-79-227 +17
 
114. Moises Cobo, Coastal Carolina 72-73-83-228 +18
 
114. Ben Hayes, Southern California 75-74-79-228 +18
 
114. Gator Todd, Alabama 74-77-77-228 +18
 
114. Travis Whisman, UNLV 73-74-81-228 +18
 
118. Zach Bixler, Washington 74-74-81-229 +19
 
118. Jesse Mueller, Arizona State 78-71-80-229 +19
 
118. Brett Myers, Tulsa 77-75-77-229 +19
 
118. Linus Nilsson, San Diego State 73-77-79-229 +19
 
118. Andrew Parr, Texas A&M 81-74-74-229 +19
 
118. JohnScott Rattan, Tennessee 72-79-78-229 +19
 
118. Matthew Rosenfeld, Texas 70-81-78-229 +19
 
118. Ben Spickard, Tennessee 77-69-83-229 +19
 
126. Scott Campbell, Arkansas 74-76-80-230 +20
 
126. Thomas Hagler, Alabama 75-75-80-230 +20
 
126. Wes Homan, SMU 74-77-79-230 +20
 
126. Bryan Jones, Georgia Southern 78-75-77-230 +20
 
126. Farren Keenan, Texas 81-76-73-230 +20
 
126. y-Korey Mahoney, Eastern Michigan 72-79-79-230 +20
 
132. Mark Anderson, New Mexico 73-83-75-231 +21
 
132. Jon David Kennedy, Georgia Southern 77-76-78-231 +21
 
132. Martin Piller, Texas A&M 81-74-76-231 +21
 
132. Brad Robinson, Coastal Carolina 78-78-75-231 +21
 
132. Santiago Russi, Purdue 77-76-78-231 +21
 
137. Scott Jamieson, Augusta State 78-71-83-232 +22
 
137. John Poucher, UCLA 77-76-79-232 +22
 
139. Chris McCartin, Wake Forest 79-73-81-233 +23
 
139. Pat Phillips, Stanford 79-78-76-233 +23
 
139. Ben Scott, Missouri 81-75-77-233 +23
 
139. Eric Shriver, Arkansas 81-71-81-233 +23
 
139. Manuel Villegas, Florida 75-79-79-233 +23
 
139. Kurt Watkins, Georgia Southern 73-77-83-233 +23
 
145. Austin Hackett, Tulsa 76-76-82-234 +24
 
145. Tyler Ley, Southern California 75-77-82-234 +24
 
147. Josh Farrell, Arkansas 73-82-80-235 +25
 
147. Matthew Savage, Stanford 79-79-77-235 +25
 
147. David Schultz, Texas A&M 75-79-81-235 +25
 
150. Matt Kohn, Kentucky 76-74-86-236 +26
 
150. Trent Twaddle, Missouri 79-76-81-236 +26
 
152. Nick Becker, Brigham Young 79-77-83-239 +29
 
152. Sam Korbe, Tulsa 75-77-87-239 +29
 
152. Joakim Renstrom, UCLA 81-76-82-239 +29
 
155. Mike Keast, Augusta State 79-76-85-240 +30
 
WD - Dan Kleckner , SMU 74-83-WD

 
Related Links:
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    McIlroy 'really pleased' with opening 69 in Abu Dhabi

    By Ryan LavnerJanuary 18, 2018, 12:10 pm

    It was an auspicious 2018 debut for Rory McIlroy.

    Playing alongside world No. 1 Dustin Johnson for his first round since October, McIlroy missed only one green and shot a bogey-free 69 at the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship. McIlroy is three shots back of reigning Race to Dubai champion Tommy Fleetwood, who played in the same group as McIlroy and Johnson.

    Starting on the back nine at Abu Dhabi Golf Club, McIlroy began with 11 consecutive pars before birdies on Nos. 3, 7 and 8.

    “I was excited to get going,” he told reporters afterward. “The last couple of months have been really nice in terms of being able to concentrate on things I needed to work on in my game and health-wise. I feel like I’m the most prepared for a season that I’ve ever been, but it was nice to get back out there.”

    Fleetwood, the defending champion, raced out to another lead while McIlroy and Johnson, who shot 72, just tried to keep pace.

    “Tommy played very well and I was just trying to hang onto his coattails for most of the round, so really pleased – bogey-free 69, I can’t really complain,” McIlroy said.

    This was his first competitive round in four months, since a tie for 63rd at the Dunhill Links. He is outside the top 10 in the world ranking for the first time since 2014. 

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    Hadwin returns to site of last year's 59

    By Will GrayJanuary 17, 2018, 11:04 pm

    Adam Hadwin had a career season last year, one that included shooting a 59 and winning a PGA Tour event. But those two achievements didn't occur in the same week.

    While Hadwin's breakthrough victory came at the Valspar Championship in March, it was at the CareerBuilder Challenge in January when he first made headlines with a third-round 59 at La Quinta Country Club. Hadwin took a lead into the final round as a result, but he ultimately couldn't keep pace with Hudson Swafford.

    He went on to earn a spot at the Tour Championship, and Hadwin made his first career Presidents Cup appearance in October. Now the Canadian returns to Palm Springs, eager to improve on last year's result and hoping to earn a spot in the final group for a third straight year after a T-6 finish in 2016.

    "A lot of good memories here in the desert," Hadwin told reporters. "I feel very comfortable here, very at home. Lots of Canadians, so it's always fun to play well in front of those crowds and hopefully looking forward to another good week."

    Hadwin's 59 last year was somewhat overshadowed, both by the fact that he didn't win the event and that it came just one week after Justin Thomas shot a 59 en route to victory at the Sony Open. But he's still among an exclusive club of just eight players to have broken 60 in competition on Tour and he's eager to get another crack at La Quinta on Saturday.

    "If I'm in the same position on 18, I'm gunning for 58 this year," Hadwin said, "not playing safe for 59."

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    Rahm: If I thought like Phil, I could not hit a shot

    By Will GrayJanuary 17, 2018, 10:39 pm

    When it comes to Jon Rahm and Phil Mickelson, there are plenty of common bonds. Both starred at Arizona State, both are now repped by the same agency and Rahm's former college coach and agent, Tim Mickelson, now serves full-time as his brother's caddie.

    Those commonalities mean the two men have played plenty of practice rounds together, but the roads quickly diverge when it comes to on-course behavior. Rahm is quick, fiery and decisive; Mickelson is one of the most analytical players on Tour. And as Rahm told reporters Wednesday at the CareerBuilder Challenge, those differences won't end anytime soon.

    "I don't need much. 'OK, it's like 120 (yards), this shot, right," Rahm said. "And then you have Phil, it's like, 'Oh, this shot, the moisture, this going on, this is like one mile an hour wind sideways, it's going to affect it one yard. This green is soft, this trajectory. They're thinking, and I'm like, 'I'm lost.' I'm like, 'God if I do that thought process, I could not hit a golf shot.'"


    CareerBuilder Challenge: Articles, photos and videos


    The tactics may be more simplified, but Rahm can't argue with the results. While Mickelson is in the midst of a winless drought that is approaching five years, Rahm won three times around the world last year and will defend a PGA Tour title for the first time next week at Torrey Pines.

    Both men are in the field this week in Palm Springs, where Mickelson will make his 2018 debut with what Rahm fully expects to be another dose of high-level analytics for the five-time major winner with his brother on the bag.

    "It's funny, he gets to the green and then it's the same thing. He's very detail-oriented," Rahm said of Mickelson. "I'm there listening and I'm like, 'Man, I hope we're never paired together for anything because I can't think like this. I would not be able to play golf like that. But for me to listen to all that is really fun."

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    DJ changes tune on golf ball distance debate

    By Will GrayJanuary 17, 2018, 9:16 pm

    World No. 1 Dustin Johnson is already one of the longest hitters in golf, so he's not looking for any changes to be made to golf ball technology - despite comments from him that hinted at just such a notion two months ago.

    Johnson is in the Middle East this week for the Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, and he told BBC Sport Wednesday that he wouldn't be in favor of making changes to the golf ball in order to remedy some of the eye-popping distances players are hitting the ball with ever-increasing frequency.

    "It's not like we are dominating golf courses," Johnson said. "When was the last time you saw someone make the game too easy? I don't really understand what all the debate is about because it doesn't matter how far it goes; it is about getting it in the hole."

    Johnson's rhetorical question might be answered simply by looking back at his performance at the Sentry Tournament of Champions earlier this month, an eight-shot romp that featured a tee shot on the 433-yard 12th hole that bounded down a slope to within inches of the hole.

    Johnson appeared much more willing to consider a reduced-distance ball option at the Hero World Challenge in November, when he sat next to tournament host Tiger Woods and supported Woods' notion that the ball should be addressed.

    "I don't mind seeing every other professional sport, they play with one ball. All the pros play with the same ball," Johnson said. "In baseball, the guys that are bigger and stronger, they can hit a baseball a lot further than the smaller guys. ... I think there should be some kind of an advantage for guys who work on hitting it far and getting that speed that's needed, so having a ball, like the same ball that everyone plays, there's going to be, you're going to have more of an advantage."

    Speaking Wednesday in Abu Dhabi, Johnson stood by the notion that regardless of whether the rules change or stay the same, he plans to have a leg up on the competition.

    "If the ball is limited then it is going to limit everyone," he said. "I'm still going to hit it that much further than I guess the average Tour player."