Denver golf: Mixing venerable Cherry Hills and Colorado Golf Club with area munis

By Brandon TuckerOctober 24, 2012, 2:04 am

DENVER, Colo. – Life sure is good inside the gates.

Never was the contrast between the club life and the public golfer so prevalent and revealing than during my recent visit to the Mile High City.

In a span of just over 48 hours, I played two of the best private courses in Colorado: Cherry Hills Country Club and Colorado Golf Club – followed by two rounds at city-owned municipal courses, Coyote Creek Golf Course in Fort Lupton and Park Hill Golf Club in Denver.

Talk about alternate universes. It was amazing to experience the difference between the course conditions, the layouts themselves, the settings around each and maybe most interesting, the way golfers acted during my rounds.

Modern minimalism at Colorado Golf Club

There are few signs of the early financial troubles of Colorado Golf Club (pictured above), a dynamic 7,602-yard Bill Coore & Ben Crenshaw design that opened in 2007 in Parker, southeast of Denver. The club sparkles today with a stunning stone clubhouse that serves tremendous food (try the buffalo meat chili), a handful of luxury villas for members and their guests and a gorgeous golf course ranked fifth in the state by Golf Digest and No. 35 among the top 100 modern golf courses by Golfweek.

The minimalist tendencies of Coore and Crenshaw work particularly well on this rolling scrubland site. Their scruffy-edged bunkers visually pop against the firm green turf and stark high desert terrain. An endless parade of risk-reward shots on drivable par-4s and go-for-broke par-5s should play a role in who wins the 2013 Solheim Cup. The course certainly shined in the 2010 PGA Senior Championship when back-to-back final-round eagles on par-5s at No. 15 and No. 16 put Fred Couples into a playoff with eventual champion Tom Lehman.

“It’s a very strategic course,” Lehman said then. “One of the reasons why I like it so much, there’s so many options and decisions you have to make, and I really believe that it gives you the ability to really go for it as much as you want to or not.'

It was the kind of course that I could play every day and never tire of trying to solves its nuances.

History thrives at Cherry Hills Country Club

Cherry Hills

Cherry Hills Country Club

I’ve been lucky enough to walk into some historic clubhouses at Oakland Hills, Pebble Beach, Sahalee, Pinehurst, Crystal Downs, East Lake and elsewhere, but none gave me the sense of history and tradition like Cherry Hills.

The club’s new Hall of Champions is a profound tribute to its tournament lore. Just steps inside the doors, there’s a large mural, the iconic image of Arnold Palmer throwing his cap in the air to celebrate his come-from-behind win at the 1960 U.S. Open. Glass cases hanging on the wall showcase artifacts from each of the club’s major events, from Phil Mickelson’s U.S. Amateur win in 1990 to the 1993 U.S. Senior Open victory of Jack Nicklaus and more. One case holds clubs that played a key role in securing certain tournaments, like the sand wedge Birdie Kim used to hole a bunker shot at No. 18 to steal the 2005 U.S. Women’s Open.

Outside, there’s no better walk in golf than Cherry Hills, a traditional parkland layout ranked No. 67 among the top 100 courses in America by Golf Digest. Go ahead and try to drive the first green like Palmer did in 1960. Thick rough and subtle breaks on treacherously fast greens befuddled players at the 2012 U.S. Amateur. Next up is the 2014 BMW Championship. The drumbeat of history marches on at Cherry Hills.

Surviving 36 holes of 'Muni-mania'

Park Hill

Park Hill Golf Course

Privilege does come with a price at those clubs. Both the Colorado Golf Club and Cherry Hills have strict no cell phone policies. The Colorado Golf Club doesn’t allow hats to be worn inside the clubhouse. A strict pace-of-play regimen at Cherry Hills keeps members constantly on the prowl for slow-playing guests.

All those rules, obviously, go out the window in muni-land. One golfer I played with at Coyote Creek wore jeans. He also dared me to hit a tee shot out of bounds on the sixth tee, aiming at a huge water storage drum. I nailed it on my second attempt, completing what was essentially my initiation into their circle of friends in golf.

A twosome of buddies I was paired with at Park Hill blasted music from an IPOD inside their cart. The third member of our group was a beginner who would have never survived Cherry Hills’ pace-of-play requirements. I couldn’t help but wonder how quickly all these golfers would get tossed out of Cherry Hills or the Colorado Golf Club for such behavior.

The munis had none of the shot values or conditions of the private clubs. They both were relatively short, Coyote Creek at 6,412 yards and Park Hill at 6,592 yards. There were no truly memorable holes or magical moments, either. For various reasons, though, those rounds were almost as fun, thanks to the people I played with and the relaxing come-one, come-all atmospheres. They reminded me life outside the gates isn’t too shabby after all.

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Luiten in three-way tie at Oman Open

By Associated PressFebruary 17, 2018, 4:17 pm

MUSCAT, Oman - Joost Luiten showed a return to form after a mediocre 2017 as he moved into a three-way tie for the lead in the Oman Open on Saturday.

The Dutchman shot a second straight 6-under 66 - the joint best score of the day - to move to 12-under 204. He was joined at the top by Matthew Southgate (69) and Frenchman Julien Guerrier (66) after the third round at the Greg Norman-designed Al Mouj Golf Club.

England's Chris Wood (69), another man on the comeback trail, was in fourth place at 11 under, but it could have been a lot better if not for a bogey-bogey finish. Adrian Otaegui (66) was a shot behind Wood while pre-tournament favorite, France's Alexander Levy (67), was at 9 under.

The 90th-ranked Luiten credited some hot iron play for his success after a cracked driver set him back last year when he had just two top-10 finishes the whole season.


Full-field scores from the NBO Oman Golf Classic


''I cracked my driver in my first tournament of the year in Abu Dhabi and it took me almost six months to get another one that I really liked. Once you are not driving the ball well, it puts pressure on other parts of your game,'' said the 32-year-old Luiten. ''My iron play did not get me into trouble at all today.''

Southgate was quick off the block with three birdies in his first three holes. But the Englishman then made two bogeys and a double bogey in his next four holes, and a birdie on the ninth saw him make the turn at even-par.

That forced him to think differently for the back nine and he was rewarded with three birdies.

''It was quite funny really,'' Southgate said. ''We birdied the ninth and I walked off and said to my caddie Gary ... 'We've just shot level par, so let's just pretend that we've made nine solid pars and that we haven't holed a putt and haven't made a birdie. Let's just start again on the 10th'.''

The 32-year-old Guerrier started his round with a monster 48-foot birdie putt and had an eagle, six birdies and two bogeys.

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J.Y. Ko increases lead; Lydia focuses on positives

By Associated PressFebruary 17, 2018, 3:33 pm

ADELAIDE, Australia - Jin Young Ko continued her domination of the Women's Australian Open, shooting a 1-under 71 Saturday to increase her lead to four strokes after three rounds.

The South Korean, who led after each of the opening two rounds of the LPGA tournament, had a three-round total of 11-under 205 at Kooyonga Golf Club.

Australian golfer Hannah Green moved into second place after the round of the day, a 66.

Green, 21, is seeking to become the first Australian to claim her national crown since Karrie Webb won the last of her five titles in 2014. Webb, who is playing a part-time schedule in 2018, missed the cut Friday by one stroke.

Green birdied her first three holes on Saturday and then added two more on the eighth and ninth. Two more birdies followed on the back nine with her only dropped shot a bogey on the 17th.


Full-field scores from the ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open


"I was very pleased with my ball striking," Green said. "I have put myself in contention so I'm very happy with how things are panning out.

"It was a real shame about Karrie missing the cut, but I know she has got different plans."

South Korea's Hyejin Choi (70), was tied for third, five strokes behind. Australia's top-ranked golfer Minjee Lee was tied for fifth after a 69, six off the lead.

Former No. 1 Lydia Ko shot a 71 and was eight strokes behind.

"It's always nice to be able to start the season on a good note, and I've obviously got tomorrow," Lydia Ko said. "Hopefully, I'll be able to finish off on a high note."

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Cantlay, McDowell, Saunders share lead at Riviera

By Doug FergusonFebruary 17, 2018, 3:51 am

LOS ANGELES - Tiger Woods waited 12 years to get back to Riviera and lasted only two days.

Woods had three straight bogeys early on the back nine Friday and didn't play well enough to make up for his misses. He had a 5-over 76 and missed the cut in the Genesis Open for the first time in nine appearances as a pro.

He was at 6-over 148, one shot worse than his PGA Tour debut as a 16-year-old at Riviera.

''I missed every tee shot left and I did not putt well, didn't feel very good on the greens,'' Woods said. ''And consequently, never made a run. I knew I had to make a run on that back nine, and I went the other way.''

Patrick Cantlay ran off three straight birdies toward the end of his morning round, starting with a tap-in on the par-3 sixth when he missed a hole-in-one by a fraction of an inch, and shot a 69. He was tied with Graeme McDowell (66), the former U.S. Open champion who is trying to work his way back from a two-year slump.

They were at 7-under 135.

Sam Saunders also was at 7 under, making back-to-back birdies until it was too dark to continue. He had three holes remaining in his second round. Ryan Moore bogeyed his final hole for a 68 and was one shot behind at 136.

Rory McIlroy overcame a few short misses on the front nine for a 69 and was at 2-under 140.


Full-field scores from the Genesis Open

Genesis Open: Articles, photos and videos


Cantlay was coming off a three-putt bogey when his tee shot at the par-3 sixth - the hole with a bunker in the middle of the green - landed above the flag and to the right, and then rolled back down the slope just over the right edge of the cup.

''I actually missed a little to the right, but it's a bowl back there so as long as you get the number right, it should be pretty close,'' Cantlay said.

He followed with a short iron into 5 feet for birdie, a 15-foot birdie on the next hole and then a wild drive that led to a bogey on his final hole.

McDowell has gone 59 starts worldwide since his last victory and has fallen out of the top 200 in the world. He had missed four straight cuts dating to late last year, though he felt he was hitting it well in practice. What helped was seeing some good scores.

''All I'm missing is a couple little numbers and a little bit of confidence,'' McDowell said.

Defending champion Dustin Johnson shot a 69 and gets to stick around for the weekend. He was at 1-over 143. Bubba Watson, who won in 2014 and 2016, has fallen out of the top 200 in the world after a two-year drought. He shot a 70 and was at 4-under 138, and then headed for the NBA All-Star weekend to play in the celebrity game.

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Plenty of good – and bad – in Tiger's missed cut

By Rex HoggardFebruary 17, 2018, 3:10 am

LOS ANGELES – Do you want the good news or the bad?

Actually, having any good news to report when it comes to Tiger Woods is something of a sea change after a tumultuous few years for the 14-time major champion both on and off the golf course, so let’s start there.

Right about the time Woods began his round of birdie-bogey bingo on Day 2 at the Genesis Open, news broke that he’d signed to play next week’s Honda Classic.

The annual South Florida PGA Tour stop may be just a short drive from the Woods compound, but his commitment to play PGA National is very much a reason for optimism.

It marks, after all, the first time Woods has played consecutive weeks on Tour since 2015 when he went from the PGA Championship  where he missed the cut  to the Wyndham Championship, site of his last top-10 (T-10) on Tour. Last year, when he attempted to go back-to-back from the Farmers Insurance Open to the Dubai Desert Classic, came to a woeful end when he withdrew after just a single round with an ailing back.

“I'm very pleased. I'm very excited about it,” Woods said as darkness settled Friday over Riviera Country Club. “I wish I would have two more competitive rounds to head into next week, but that's not the case. But I get a chance to do some work and I'll go do some work.”

Throughout this entire process, which began last April when he had fusion surgery on his lower back, Woods has talked of benchmarks and protocols. He has, by all accounts, been a model patient, following doctor’s orders and easing his way back into the competitive fray.

As late as Tuesday, Woods was coy when asked about whether he would play the Honda Classic, figuring it would be a “great” sign if he did play, but adding it would be a “smart” sign if he didn’t.


Full-field scores from the Genesis Open

Genesis Open: Articles, photos and videos


Although the late Yogi Berra would probably applaud Woods’ misdirection, his point was valid. He’s never been real keen on announcing his schedule in advance, and that’s particularly evident and prudent now that his competitive fortunes are dictated by the whims of his surgically repaired back.

But on Friday as Woods was setting out for his round, he offered the most telling assessment yet that his health, which for so long has left him perched on the edge between continued greatness and competitive irrelevance, is no longer an issue.

“I'm both pleased and also not very happy with some parts of it,” he said. “It's nice to be back competing again and to be able to go out there and play, practice after each round. That's been nice, something I haven't done in years.”

And now the bad.

Woods began the day at Riviera teetering on the cut line at 1 over, played his opening loop in 2 over par to drift further back and closed his day, and week, with a 5-over 76 and a 6-over total to miss the cut by five strokes.

There is no shortage of culprits on this front.

He struggled off the tee. He struggled with his irons. And on Friday he struggled with his short game, which had been the rock his comeback had rested on until now.

He was once again plagued by the wild miss off the tee, hitting just 13 of 28 fairways for two days with a tee ball that offended equally, sailing right four times and left seven. So much for that “stout” new shaft.

But if his tee ball became public enemy No. 1, his iron play may have been worse with Woods finding a pedestrian 16 of 36 greens in regulation. That’s the fewest greens for Tiger through two rounds in a Tour event as a professional.

“I would say he's a pretty good ways away,” figured Justin Thomas, who may need to find another ride home after flying out to Los Angeles on Air Tiger. “He's obviously not driving it well, he's not hitting the shots that he wants to. Probably the distance control isn't quite there.”

Thomas was quick to point out that despite Woods’ struggles he continued to fight like few can, at least on Thursday when he turned what probably should have been a 75 into a 72. On Friday, the magic ran out.

Woods’ abbreviated week in Los Angeles began with a lost ball in a eucalyptus tree and ended with his surprising loss of touch on the greens.

He missed par attempts from 13 (No. 9), 4 1/2 (No. 11), 5 1/2 (No. 12) and 6 1/2 (No. 16) feet on Day 2, the final three miscues marking his first three three-putts of the week. That deft touch that had secured him weekend tee times last month at Torrey Pines and kept his round on Day 1 at the Genesis Open from becoming ugly, had vanished.

“The feeling of not feeling very good over my putts finally caught up with me,” Woods said.

Woods has a few days to think about those feelings, and he’ll spend the weekend fulfilling his host duties at Riviera before heading home for next week’s Honda Classic.

He understood as well as anyone that it was always going to be this way following so many years of false starts and relapses, but the difference now is that there’s some good news to go along with the bad.