Wilson sees the light in driver technology


The folks at Wilson Golf say they will be focusing more and more in the coming years on the driver category, and the companys latest entry into that arena is the DXi Superlight.

Released this past winter, it tips the scales at a positively dainty 269 grams, which is roughly 50 grams lighter than most traditional drivers. Its primary performance story is an increasingly familiar one in golf equipment today. The driver is lighter, thus allowing golfers to increase their clubhead speeds in hopes of increasing their distance on tee shots.

According to Michael Vrska, global director of golf research and development for the Chicago-based equipment maker, Wilson achieved that lightness in part by employing lightweight shafts (Matrix Ozik) and grips (WinnLite Firm) in the DXi.

We also thinned out non-structural areas of the titanium crown through a chemical etching process as well as parts of the sole, he adds. That reduced its overall weight by six grams, and we made sure that whatever weight we had left was concentrated in the heel and toe of the clubhead to maintain optimum CG (Center of Gravity).

As important as developing those features were, Vrska is quick to point out that there was much more to making the DXi work.

We also used a five-zone, modified cup-face design to expand the sweet spot on the face into the heel and toe for greater forgiveness as we pushed the CT (Characteristic Time, a way of measuring spring-like effect) to the limit to enhance distance even more, he said.

In addition, we gave this driver the lowest measured club MOI (Moment of Inertia) on the market, which means it delivers explosive power even as it is very easy to swing.