Biggest Movers: Snedeker inches toward Hazeltine

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Each week, GolfChannel.com takes a look at the players who made moves up - and down - the various ranking systems in the world of golf.

Here's a look at this week's Biggest Movers, as Si Woo Kim reaches new career heights and Brandt Snedeker takes another step toward locking up a Ryder Cup bid:

• Snedeker's T-3 finish at the Wyndham Championship helped him jump three spots in the U.S. Ryder Cup points race to No. 6, more than $230,000 above the new cutoff point. The top eight players after The Barclays will qualify automatically for Hazeltine.

• Snedeker is now one spot ahead of Zach Johnson in both the Ryder Cup race (Nos. 6 and 7) and the world rankings (Nos. 23 and 24) after his second top-5 finish in the last three years at Sedgefield Country Club.

• Kim, 21, cruised to victory to become the youngest winner on Tour this season. As a result, he jumped 53 spots to No. 62 in the latest world rankings. It's the first time in his career that he's been ranked inside the Official World Golf Ranking top 100.

• Luke Donald's runner-up finish moved the Englishman up 26 spots to No. 64 in the world, his highest ranking since a top-10 finish at the British Masters in October.

• Bud Cauley's T-10 finish and $134,400 payday moved him up 18 spots to No. 119 in the season-long money race, guaranteeing Cauley a full PGA Tour card for the 2016-17 season.

• A T-3 result in Greensboro meant Hideki Matsuyama moved up four spots to No. 16 in the latest world rankings, his best standing since the U.S. Open in June.

• Brett Stegmaier's T-5 finish at Wyndham was his best result since October, and it meant the PGA Tour rookie moved up 74 spots to a career-best No. 219 in the world.

• One week after just missing the Olympic podium, Thomas Pieters' runner-up at the European Tour's Czech Masters moved him seven more spots to No. 54 in the world and onto the cusp of the all-important top 50.

• The man who beat Pieters by a shot in Prague, American Paul Peterson, moved up 218 spots to No. 180 after earning his first career European Tour title at age 28.