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Kuchar's biggest problem? Name of the Open venue

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HOYLAKE, England – Matt Kuchar is one of the most laid-back dudes in professional golf. His happy-go-lucky style, smooth walk and sheepish tip of the cap after dropping a birdie make it seem like he doesn’t have a care in the world.

This week, it seems like his biggest angst is that he’s not entirely sure how to refer to the host course of the British Open.

“I could use a little help,” he said Wednesday. “I still don’t know exactly how to refer to it, if I refer to the course as Hoylake or Royal Liverpool or Royal Liverpool at Hoylake. I still have heard it many different ways, or even The Royal.

“Maybe you guys could help me there. There’s several names, aren’t there?”

Kuchar was then told by the moderator that Royal Liverpool at Hoylake would suffice.

“Or Hoylake? One or the other, not both? Double namer.”


Open Championship: Articles, videos and photos


The official name is Royal Liverpool Golf Club. But the course is not in Liverpool, it’s in the nearby town of Hoylake, which is about 12 miles away. So, in the late 1800s it was casually referred to as the Hoylake links, which was shortened to Hoylake.

To answer Kuchar’s question, Royal Liverpool and Hoylake are both acceptable. This is the same situation with Royal St. George’s, site of the 2011 British Open. The club is in the town of Sandwich, and is often called such.

Hope Kuchar sleeps well tonight.