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Make those crucial putts under pressure like Scott

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Adam Scott has had his share of chances to win major tournaments in the past.

The Aussie, known for his impeccable golf swing, had not been able to breakthrough on a major stage; until Sunday.

The biggest reason Scott was able to walk away with a green jacket at the Masters was because of some crucial putts he got to go down.

Using the soon-to-be-banned (maybe) anchored stroke, Scott got what he needed from the flatstick to win his first ever major, defeating Angel Cabrera on the second playoff hole.

We all understand the importance of putting, especially for tour players, where the talent margin is razor thin.

Getting the most out of your putting can be the difference between winning and losing, or breaking 100, 90, 80 or 70 for the first time.

Here are some keys you can practice to help you get the most out of your putting:

• Use a consistent setup to produce a repeatable putting stroke. Just like with a full swing, your putting stroke will only be as consistent as your setup. I believe that good alignment and an athletic posture, meaning your body is parallel to the target line and balanced and stable at address, gives players the best opportunity to be consistent. Practice using alignment rods and mirrors to check your posture and alignment, giving you the proper feedback needed to succeed.

• Eliminate unnecessary movement in your putting stroke. To efficiently swing a putter, very little movement is needed. From your athletic posture, focus on using the big muscles in your arms and shoulders to swing the putter. Avoid using the smaller, twitchy muscles found in your forearms and wrists. Your lower body and head will remain still from start to finish in your stroke. To avoid excess head movement, place the ball on a coin when you practice putting. Keep your eyes on the coin an extra second or two after rolling your putt.

• Learn to love putting. When you love doing something, you tend to get good at it. Most bad putters absolutely hate to putt. If you are to become a good putter, you must first change your attitude toward putting. A positive attitude will give you the will to spend more time practicing your putting, leading to more success on the greens.

Take an online lesson with Tyrus York.