The Game of Life

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For 11 years I’ve been working at GOLF CHANNEL. For seven I’ve been writing for the Web site.
 
I’m not certain, but by rough estimate I’ve written 10,113 articles/columns/features on Tiger Woods. I’ve discussed everything from how I think the Skins Game needs to go the route of Hoffa to what it’s like traveling with John Daly.
 
But there’s nothing I enjoy more in this business than telling a story that needs to be told. These are stories of inspiration and great spirit. Stories of tragedy and heartache. These are stories of life.
 
There is the saying: Golf is life. You can really plug in any activity into the subject line of that sentence and it will apply to someone. Golf, however, is not life; it’s a just a part of it.
 
But for some golf is a very important part of life. It’s a way for them to connect with a family member, a way to socialize, a way help them cope with an illness.
 
Inevitably, I will have to write more articles on Tiger Woods. I don’t mind it so much. He’s well deserving of the press and you certainly love to read about him.
 
But there is more to golf than Tiger Woods. There is more to golf than just golf. There is life.
 
Over the years I’ve been able to tell the stories of people like Jeff Julian, Mallory Code and Scott Draper.
 
In 2005, I traveled with Rich Lerner and GOLF CHANNEL producer Matthew Hegarty to New Orleans for their “Golf Chronicles” shoot. I was able to write a complimentary series about the role of golf in the aftermath of Katrina. It might not seem important, but golf was quite meaningful to quite a few people during that time.
 
There are plenty more stories out there. Plenty of which I am not aware. That’s where you come in. If you have or know of an inspirational story relating to golf, e-mail me at mbaggs@golfchannelclub.com – the same if you have one of woe or caution which relates to the sport.
 
I won’t be able to tell every tale, but hopefully there will be a few I can select which will offer more meaning to you the readers than any op-ed ever could.
 
Email your stories to Mercer Baggs