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Cut Line Angel and Heroes

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Verizon Heritage may be the worst cut all year to miss. Even if youre out of the hunt come the weekend, sweeping views of Calibogue Sound and live music wafting up from the Quarterdeck make for easy living.
 
Made Cut
 
  • Angel Cabrera. A few years back we were talking with Geoff Ogilvys swing coach Dale Lynch and the conversation turned to the 2006 U.S. Open, perhaps the last major played with as many moving parts on Sunday as last weeks Masters, and the Aussies take was interesting.
     
    Four players had a chance to win with a par at the last hole (Ogilvy, Colin Montgomerie, Jim Furyk and Phil Mickelson), Lynch said. Only one player did it.
     
    The 2009 Masters may be known as the tournament Kenny Perry, or perhaps Chad Campbell, lost, but history has a way of gnawing away at the minutiae and leaving only the facts. And the fact is only the broad-shouldered Argentine was fitted for a green jacket on Sunday.
     
  • Hilton Head Heroes. Truth is every week a local charity benefits from having the Tour in town. This week in Hilton Head, however, the benefits seemed to be flowing in both directions.
     
    Following a short press conference earlier this week Gregg Russell ' who founded Hilton Head Heroes with his wife, Lindy, in 1998 ' was headed out the door when he stopped to meet Tour player Jonathan Byrd, whose father, Jim, is battling cancer. Fifteen minutes later the two were still talking.
     
    Hilton Head Heroes benefits children who suffer from life-threatening or serious illnesses by bringing them and their families to Hilton Head for a cost-free vacation.
     
    We try to give them a week away from the pressures of having a sick child and doctors and chemo and treatments and give them a week at the beach where they can run and play and see the dolphins and in many cases say good-bye to their little one who is sick, Russel said. The long-range goal is just to keep doing what we're doing. We never run out of families, that's the bad news.
     
  • Sandy Lyle. The 51-year-old former Masters champion plodded his way to perhaps the quietest top-20 finish ever. But then that lack of attention doesnt surprise those within Lyles inner circle.
     
    This years Ryder Cup snub may have hurt the Englishman but he has used the episode as motivation. Lyle began working with TPC Sawgrass swing coach Todd Jones last year and is playing his best golf in 10 years, said one close observer.
     
    In retrospect, the European Ryder Cup selection committee may have been leery of a captain with more game than some of his players. At Augusta National, the only potential European Ryder Cupper to beat Lyle was Graeme McDowell.
     

    Missed Cut ' Did not finish (MDF)
     
  • Rory McIlroy. We like the kid, in fact theres not much not to like, and he might have even had a point when he initially declined to return to Augusta National last Friday to review footage of what one UK network reported was a rules infraction on the 18th hole.
     
    Less than 24 hours later he defied the green jackets for the second time when he rushed past reporters following his third round. That may work when dealing with European Tour officials, but not at Augusta National.
     
    We write the entire episode off to youthful inexperience. Besides, if thats the only china the Northern Irishman mishandles during his barnstorming tour of the United States, one should consider the entire trip a success.
     
  • Europeans. Last weeks Masters made it a cool decade since a player from Europe has slipped into a green jacket. In fact, the Magnolia mile has gotten so daunting for the lads from the other side of the pond they didnt even have a player finish in the top 10 last week.
     
    The answer, at least considering the depth of talent the Continent has produced in recent years, seems to be little more than bad timing. But considering how one of these types of droughts can fester the sooner the slump ends the better. Just ask an Australian.
     

    Missed Cut
     
  • Sergio Garcia. You may not like the Spaniards snarky post-round assessment of the Georgia masterpiece, but El Nino is hardly the first player that didnt take a shine to Augusta National ' although he might be the first one to do it publically in some time ' and he certainly is entitled to whatever opinion gets him through his pampered days.
     
    But Cut Line has a bigger bone with Garcias canned apology ' weve interviewed him on numerous occasions and never heard the word iconic come out of his mouth.
     
    Just five days after fellow Spaniard Seve Ballesteros was honored at the champions dinner, Garcias sulking was poor form, but the apology was simply the worst kind of backpedaling.
     
  • World Nos. 1-6. We know Masters week can leave players in search of a soft couch, and maybe an equally soft sport psychologist. But there is something wrong when the closest thing the Tour has to a decompression chamber, also known as the Verizon Heritage, cant pull a single player in the top 6.
     
    Its hard to question No. 6 Perry, who may need a few weeks on the DL to recover from his Masters miss, and Tiger Woods and Phil Mickelson certainly delivered the goods on Sunday in the years uber-pairing. But, as commissioner Tim Finchem has been telling anyone who will listen, these are tough times that demand new rules.
     
    Translation: you may not like Harbour Town, but for one week cant we suffer through tree-lined fairways and plates of shrimp and cheese grits for the greater good?
     

    Email your thoughts to Rex Hoggard
     
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