Mike Davis chosen as head of USGA

By Associated PressMarch 2, 2011, 9:45 pm

JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP)—Mike Davis is taking over as executive director ofthe U.S. Golf Association without having to give up part of his old job that heloved the most—setting up golf courses for the U.S. Open.

The USGA said Wednesday it has selected Davis to be its seventh executivedirector. He replaces David Fay, who retired in December after 21 years incharge.

Davis, a 21-year veteran of the USGA and its senior director of rules andcompetition since 2005, has become popular with the players over the last fiveyears for his sense of fairness in setting up U.S. Open courses. He introducedthe concept of graduated rough, and twice in the last four years has declined tochange a par 4 into a par 5 because he felt it made those holes fair andexciting.

One of those was the 18th at Torrey Pines in 2008, where Tiger Woods madebirdie on the 72nd hole to force a playoff that he won.

Staying involved in course setup was key to Davis taking over as executivedirector.

“They knew I very much wanted it,” Davis said of his new job. “I tried toargue the point that not only is it something I very much like, it’s somethingI’ve gotten decent at. So why look for a change?”

When asked if the job description was altered for Davis, USGA president JimHyler replied, “The short answer is slight.”

“Obviously, Mike has done a terrific job with the U.S. Open setup and we’dbe nuts if we pulled him out of that,” Hyler said. “We want him to continue tobe involved in our signature event from a course setup standpoint. When wetalked with Mike about this job, we never dreamed he would not be involved inthe setup. It fits very well. We get the best of both worlds.”

There’s more to the job than setting up a golf course, however.

Davis, 46, will be responsible for the day-to-day operations of the USGA,which governs golf in the United States and Mexico and works with the Royal &Ancient, which governs the rest of the world, in setting the rules andregulating equipment standards.

He reports to the USGA president, who serves two one-year terms.

Davis said he will delegate the jobs of course setup at the U.S. SeniorOpen, U.S. Women’s Open, U.S. Amateur and the Walker Cup. He said Jeff Hallwould be his temporary replacement in charge of rules and competition, and thatthe USGA is looking at reorganizing the department because of how much it hasgrown over the years.

Along with running 13 national championships, the USGA oversees some 700qualifying events.

Davis said he was apprehensive about some of his new responsibilities, whichinclude overseeing the USGA staff and working with the governing body’scorporate and broadcast partners and state associations. His only concern is nothaving enough time.

Otherwise, he said there will be only a few differences from what Fayhandled.

One of them is the broadcast booth.

Fay was famous for his bow ties, and he often sat in on NBC Sports telecastsof the U.S. Open in case a rules question arose.

“You won’t see me in a bow tie,” Davis said, adding that he most likelywould not be in the booth during a U.S. Open. Davis also said he would only getinvolved in the U.S. Open in the early morning before competition. He would notdeal with championship details such as pace of play or deciding when to stopplay in case of bad weather.

“I’ve very organized and detail oriented,” Davis said. “When it comes toother people’s areas, I believe in giving them responsibility and holding themaccountable. The stuff I do myself, I’ll get my hands dirty. But I’m not goingto micromanage people.”

Davis grew up in Pennsylvania and played college golf at Georgia Southern.

He attended his first U.S. Open in 1980 with his father, and was amazed tosee shots that barely missed the fairway disappear into deep rough, while shotswell off line landed in trampled grass where the spectators were walking. That’swhere he came up with the idea of graduated rough—shorter near the fairway,thicker as the it got farther away.

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Pairings, tee times set for championship match

By Jay CoffinMay 23, 2018, 1:02 am

STILLWATER, Okla. – Alabama coach Mic Potter has three first-team All-Americans on this team. It’s little surprise that all three are going out first in the Crimson Tide’s championship match against Arizona Wednesday at Karsten Creek.

Potter tinkered with his lineup in both the quarterfinal victory over Kent State and the semifinal win over USC. But with the NCAA title on the line, this one was a no brainer.

“We don’t want to sacrifice anything,” Potter said. “We just want to give ourselves a chance to win every match.”

Arizona kept its lineup the same all day Tuesday in defeating Pac-12 foes UCLA and Stanford in the quarterfinals and semifinals, respectively. That meant junior Bianca Pagdanganan, the Wildcats grittiest player this week, was in the last match of the day. She won twice.

Now, with all the marbles riding on the championship match, Arizona coach Laura Ianello moved Pagdanganan up to the third spot to assure that her match is key to the final outcome.

Junior Haley Moore, Arizona’s best player all year, is in the fifth spot and will face Alabama senior Lakareber Abe.

“Win or lose tomorrow, this has been a helluva ride,” Ianello said.


Alabama (2) vs. Arizona (8)

3:25PM ET: Lauren Stephenson (AL) vs. Yu-Sang Hou (AZ)

3:35PM ET: Kristen Gillman (AL) vs. Gigi Stoll (AZ)

3:45PM ET: Cheyenne Knight (AL) vs. Bianca Pagdanganan (AZ)

3:55PM ET: Angelica Moresco (AL) vs. Sandra Nordaas (AZ)

4:05PM ET: Lakareber Abe (AL) vs. Haley Moore (AZ)

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Women's NCAA finals: Arizona vs. Alabama

By Jay CoffinMay 22, 2018, 11:49 pm

STILLWATER, Okla. – It’s the SEC vs. the Pac 12 for the women’s NCAA Championship; Alabama vs. Arizona, to be more specific.

Both the Crimson Tide and Wildcats cruised in their respective semifinal matches Tuesday at Karsten Creek. Alabama easily beat USC, 3-1-1; Arizona defeated match-play juggernaut Stanford, 4-1.

Alabama’s top three players, Lauren Stephenson, Kristen Gillman and Cheyenne Knight were unstoppable forces in both matches on the marathon day. Stacked in the top three positions in the semifinals all three won their matches on the 17th hole, making the last two matches inconsequential.


NCAA Women’s DI Championship: Scoring and TV times

NCAA Women’s DI Championship: Full coverage


Arizona, the eighth seed, won as decisively as second-seeded Alabama, but needed a miracle to be in this position in the first place.

Junior Bianca Pagdanganan drained a 30-footer for eagle on the last hole of stroke play on Monday to get the Wildcats into a playoff against Baylor, which they won on the second hole. Then on Tuesday, presumably running on fumes, they downed top-seeded UCLA in the morning, then crushed Pac-12 foe Stanford in the afternoon.

Pagdanganan, Gigi Stoll and Hayley Moore each won both matches for Arizona on the hot, draining day.

“I don’t want to let them down so I do my best to rise to the occasion,” Pagdanganan said.

Said Arizona coach Laura Ianello: “How many players, when you tell them under pressure that you need them, can really handle it,” Ianello said about Pagdanganan. “This kid can.”

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NCAA DI Women's Champ.: Scoring, TV times

By Golf Channel DigitalMay 22, 2018, 11:30 pm

The NCAA Division I Women's Golf Championship is underway at Kartsen Creek Golf Club in Stillwater, Okla.

After three days of stroke play, eight teams advanced to the match-play portion of the championship. Quarterfinals and semifinals were contested Tuesday, with the finals being held on Wednesday. Golf Channel is airing the action live.

Wake Forest junior Jennifer Kupcho won the individual title. Click here for live finals action, beginning at 4 p.m. ET.

Scoring:

TV Times (all times ET):

Wednesday
4-8PM: Match-play finals (Click here to watch live)

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Fort Worth Invitational: Tee times, TV schedule, stats

By Golf Channel DigitalMay 22, 2018, 10:30 pm

The PGA Tour makes the short drive from Dallas to Fort Worth and Colonial Country Club. Here are the key stats and information for this week. Click here for full-field tee times.

How to watch:

Thursday, Rd. 1: Golf Channel, 4-7PM ET; live stream: https://www.golfchannel.com/pgastream

Friday, Rd. 2: Golf Channel, 4-7PM ET; live stream: https://www.golfchannel.com/pgastream

Saturday, Rd. 3: Golf Channel, 1-2:45PM ET; live stream: https://www.golfchannel.com/pgastream; CBS, 3-6 p.m.

Sunday, Rd. 4: Golf Channel, 1-2:45PM ET; live stream: https://www.golfchannel.com/pgastream; CBS, 3-6 p.m.


Purse: $7.1 million

Course: Colonial Country Club (par 70, 7,209 yards)

Defending champion: Kevin Kisner. Last year he defeated Jordan Spieth, Sean O’Hair and Jon Rahm by one stroke


Notables in the field

Jordan Spieth

• Finished T-2, 1st and T-2 in last three starts in this tournament

• 52 under par at Colonial last five years (best of anyone by 27 strokes in that span)

• 100 birdies/eagles made here last five years (most of anyone in that span)


Rickie Fowler

• First start since missed cut at The Players

• More missed cuts (3) than top-10 finishes (2) in 2018


Jon Rahm at the 2018 WGC-Mexico Championship.

Jon Rahm

• Finished T-2 in this tournament last year (66 in final round)

• 17 top-5 finishes in 46 official worldwide individual starts as professional


Webb Simpson

• First start since Players victory (fifth PGA Tour win)

• Fifth on Tour in strokes gained: putting this season (177th two seasons ago)