Notes Boo Fails History Test Heatstroke

By Associated PressAugust 11, 2007, 4:00 pm
PGA ChampionshipTULSA, Okla. -- Boo Weekley is no golf historian. He didn't pay any attention to the sport growing up, didn't consider any of the game's legends to be his idol.
 
So when he arrived at the 18th green Saturday with a chance to tie the record for the best score in a major at 63, he didn't have any idea what was riding on his 30-foot putt.
 
'Really?' he said, when told he'd had a chance at the record. 'That'd have been nice.'
 
Weekley's putt ended up well short, and he missed again to finish with a bogey and a 5-under-par 65.
 
Weekley said he read a lot of break in the first 20 feet of the putt and was trying to get it on top of a ridge and let it roll out toward the hole.
 
'I moved my big head and kind of flubbed it a little with the putter,' Weekley said.
 
But even if he had known what was at stake, Weekley said he probably wouldn't have changed his approach.
 
'If it was going to go in, it's going to go in,' Weekley said.
 
Weekley's round pushed him to even par after three rounds, where he was tied for sixth and seven strokes off the lead.
 
Of the three majors he's played this year -- including the U.S. Open at Oakmont and the British Open at Carnoustie -- Weekley said he thought Southern Hills was the only course where a record-breaking 62 might be possible, but still not easy.
 
'You sure 'nuff got to be on,' Weekley said in his Florida Panhandle drawl, a day after Tiger Woods lipped out a putt for 62 at the 18th green.
 
Weekley said he isn't driven by the chance to win majors and instead only wants to earn enough in the next decade or so to be able to retire early. He enjoyed shooting 65 at a major, but said 'what would be funner if I'm sitting at the house catching about a 10-pounder.'
 
Weekley is unfamiliar with the rules of the FedEx Cup playoffs, couldn't tell you where he is in the Presidents Cup rankings and doesn't know a whole lot about the Ryder Cup.
 
But he's finished in the top 35 at the past two majors, and is in position for an even higher finish this time.
 
'I'm learning more about how to accept just making pars,' Weekley said. 'Pars ain't bad for you. Even making a bogey ain't bad for you sometimes.'
 
SMALL'S BIG SUMMER
Even after his round fell apart on the back nine, University of Illinois golf coach Mike Small was still the top club professional remaining in the field.
 
He shot an 8-over-par 78 while playing partner Ryan Benzel, the only other club pro who made the cut, finished with an 80. The two started the day tied at 3 over.
 
Small said there wasn't a chance to spark up any kind of competition.
 
'I'll tell you what, you book around there pretty fast in this heat. We didn't have time to talk,' Small said. 'We were just doing our thing.'
 
Small formerly played on the PGA TOUR and has qualified for three U.S. Opens and four PGA Championships. He made the cut at the 2005 PGA Championship at Baltusrol before shooting an 80 in the third round, and he missed the cut by one stroke last year at Medinah.
 
'I always seem to sink to the bottom on the weekend,' Small said. 'I'm trying to figure out, `Why is that?' It's ridiculous.'
 
Small won the Illinois Open on Wednesday before coming down to Southern Hills, adding another busy week to a whirlwind summer.
 
He's held two golf schools, summer camps, recruited for four weeks and played in the U.S. Open. When he gets back, he'll hold fundraisers for the program and open a new golf practice facility when alumnus Steve Stricker returns to hold his annual golf tournament.
 
'He can really give a lot of insight to kids that are coming there to school and help them out in that direction if they're looking to maybe turn pro later on in life,' said Stricker, who shot 69.
 
'You can't beat Illinois for a school and they're starting to get up to the times with their practice facilities and all that kind of stuff, so the future looks bright for them.'
 
MAJOR LETDOWN
Padraig Harrington found it hard to motivate himself when he started the day eight strokes off of Tiger Woods' lead. Coming off the high of winning the British Open, the circumstances left the Irishman feeling 'just a little bit flat.'
 
It didn't help when he started out with a bogey on No. 1.
 
'When I started badly, I certainly felt like I was out of the tournament,' Harrington said. 'I needed that little bit of adrenaline to keep me going, obviously with all that's happened in the past couple of weeks.
 
'It certainly felt like the last couple of holes were tough going to get through.'
 
Harrington said he struggled with reading putts and getting the pace right on Southern Hills' greens. He carded a 72.
 
OBERHOLSER OVERHEATING
Arron Oberholser said he drank about 10 to 15 bottles of Gatorade diluted with water, but still was feeling symptoms of heatstroke.
 
'It's dangerous out there heat-wise,' Oberholser said after shooting even-par 70.
 
Temperatures reached as high as 99 degrees in Tulsa, and the humidity made it feel even hotter.
 
'It's kind of nice because it's so hot out there it takes your mind off everything because you're just thinking about the heat all day and how you're going to survive the heat,' Oberholser said.
 
'I don't envy people that live in this part of the country when it gets like this. This is oppressive.'
 
WANING STORM
Graeme Storm was disappointed when he failed to break par for the second straight day after opening with a 65 to take the first-round lead.
 
'I'm not playing that badly. I'm just making the odd mistake and I've holed nothing for the last couple of days really,' Storm said after shooting 74. 'It's just frustrating. The chances I'm getting, I'm not making.'
 
Storm said he didn't think he'd made a putt longer than 10 feet all week, but he made up for that Thursday by getting it closer to the pin than that. Now he's hoping just to crack the top 20, and figures he'll need another round under par to get there.
 
'It's always good to play Sunday in a major, so I'll enjoy that experience,' Storm said.
 
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    PGA Tour Latinoamerica moving season finale to Doral

    By Nick MentaOctober 18, 2018, 2:36 pm

    PGA Tour Latinoamerica announced Wednesday that it will play its season finale, the Latinoamérica Tour Championship-Shell Championship, at Trump National Doral from Nov. 29-Dec. 2.

    The limited-field event will feature the top 60 players on the circuit's money list competing on Doral's Golden Palm Course.

    “We are very happy that we will continue playing the Latinoamérica Tour Championship-Shell Championship in South Florida, and Doral is a tremendous community that we know will open its arms to our players and this tournament,” PGA Tour Latinoamerica president Jack Warfield said in a statement.

    The PGA Tour ended its more than 50-year relationship with Doral and the resort's Blue Monster course back in 2016, when Cadillac's title sponsorship of the World Golf Championship lapsed and as then-candidate Trump was mounting his bid for the presidency.

    "We continue to stand by our earlier statement, and the statement of other golf organizations, that Mr. Trump's comments are inconsistent with our strong commitment to an inclusive and welcoming environment in the game of golf," then-PGA Tour commissioner Tim Finchem said in December 2015, referring to Trump's campaign rhetoric concerning Mexicans and Muslims.

    The event was moved to Mexico City in 2017 and renamed the WGC-Mexico Championship.

    The Latinoamerica Tour Championship was staged the last two years at Melreese Country Club in Miami, where David Beckham is currently attempting to build a stadium for his Major League Soccer expansion club, Inter Miami.

    PGA Tour Latinoamerica's release states that the move to Doral "keeps the event in this part of the Sunshine State and allows the tournament to maintain its ties to The First Tee of Miami as a charitable recipient and sponsor." Melreese, the city's only public golf course, is home to the First Tee of Miami, which naturally opposes Beckham's efforts to close the facility and repurpose the land.

    A November referendum will ask voters to decide if the city should negotiate a no-bid lease with Beckham's ownership group, which seeks to $1 billion dollar complex comprising of the proposed stadium, youth soccer fields, a park, commercial and retail space, and a hotel.

    Im wins Web.com Player and Rookie of the Year awards

    By Nick MentaOctober 18, 2018, 1:22 pm

    Sungjae Im on Thursday was named the Web.com Tour's 2018 Player of the Year and Rookie of the Year.

    Im won twice on the Web.com this year, taking the season opener in January, The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic, and the season finale in August, the WinCo Foods Portland Open, to become the first player in history lead the circuit's money list wire-to-wire.

    Im is the first Korean-born player to win the Web's POY award and, at 20 years old, its youngest recipient.

    In a player vote, Im bested Anders Albertson, Sam Burns, Kramer Hickok and Martin Trainer, 2018's only other two-time winner, for POY honors, and Burns, Hickock, Trainer and Cameron Champ for ROY honors.

    “My first year on the Web.com Tour was an incredibly happy time for me,” Im said, “and it’s pretty surreal that I was able to win the first and last tournament of the season. I honestly thought I would spend about two to three years on the Web.com Tour before making it to the PGA Tour, so I’m happy to have achieved my goal so soon. I’m grateful to have earned the Player of the Year honors and I hope to finish the remainder of the PGA Tour season on a good note.”

    In his first PGA Tour start, Im tied for fourth at the Safeway Open, earning $241,280, a little less than half of the $534,326 he amassed in 25 starts as the Web's regular-season money winner.

    Playing this week's CJ Cup in his native South Korea, Im opened with a 1-over 73 Thursday.

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    Former DJ advisor found guilty in embezzlement case

    By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 18, 2018, 12:38 pm

    A federal jury has found Nathan Hardwick, a former advisor to Dustin Johnson, guilty of embezzling $26 million in funds from his now-bankrupt real estate closing firm, Morris Hardwick Schneider.

    Per Golf.com, citing Law.com, a 12-person jury convicted Hardwick of "one count of conspiracy to commit wire fraud, 21 counts of wire fraud and one count of making false statements to federally insured banks."

    As for where exactly the money went, The Sun News of Myrtle Beach, once again citing Law.com, has the details:

    "The alleged spending included $18.47 million on gambling, private jet travel and women from 2011 through August 2014. The prosecution submitted two binders of documentation as evidence that Hardwick spent $4.39 million on “female social companions,” including one testifying witness who claimed to have met him through SugarDaddy.com."

    "Other alleged expenditures described in testimony include more than $7 million at casinos, more than $3 million with a bookie, $680,000 for a luxury condo at The St. Regis Atlanta, $273,000 on a diamond ring, $186,000 on a deposit for a party on a private island, and $635,000 on a trip to the 2014 British Open for golfing buddies that included a customized jet and round at St. Andrews."

    Johnson in 2014 sued Morris Hardwick Schneider over a $3 million loan he believed to be an investment. Instead, Johnson argued, the money was going to make up for shortages created by Hardwick's embezzlement. Johnson later amended his suit to argue that Hardwick, who previously served on the board of the Dustin Johnson Foundation, was being used as a "pawn" by the firm's other partners. 

    That suit was settled in 2016 for $2 million.

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    Kang 'going with the flow,' one back of A. Jutanugarn

    By Associated PressOctober 18, 2018, 9:43 am

    SHANGHAI – Ariya Jutanugarn shot a 6-under 66 to take a one-stroke lead after the first round of the Buick LPGA Shanghai tournament on Thursday.

    The Thai player had six birdies in a bogey-free round, including three straight on Nos. 4, 5, and 6.

    ''I always have so much fun when I play in Asia,'' said Jutanugarm, who added her key was ''just not to expect anything. Just go out have fun and enjoy everything.''

    Sei Young Kim and Danielle Kang (both 67) were one shot back, with six other players only two shots off the lead.


    Full-field scores from the Buick LPGA Shanghai


    The tournament is the second of five being played in South Korea, Japan, China and Taiwan in the LPGA's annual Asian swing.

    Kang credited her improved play to new coach Butch Harmon.

    ''We just kind of simplify the game a lot,'' the American said. ''Just trying to calm it down and get back to how I used to play. Just more feel golf. Thinking less mechanics and going with the flow.''

    Kang tied for third last week at the KEB Hana Bank championship in Incheon, South Korea.

    ''Today's round went very smooth,'' Kang said. ''Coming off very good momentum after last week, and I've been hitting the ball really well, playing great. I've just been trusting my game and just keep giving myself birdie chances. They kept rolling in.''