USGA Museum Fact Sheet

By Associated PressJune 2, 2008, 4:00 pm
USGATuesday June 3, the United States Golf Associateion re-opens its USGA Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History. Here is the USGA Museum fact sheet:
 

 
What
United States Golf Association Museum and Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History
 
Description
The USGA Museum, located adjacent to USGA headquarters, has been renovated and expanded. The original Museum building was completed in 1919 and designed by noted American architect John Russell Pope. The renovated building features the Ben Hogan Room and Bob Jones Room, together with the addition of a new Arnold Palmer Room.

The expansion encompasses the new 16,000-square-foot Palmer Center, which comprises more than 5,000 square feet of public exhibition galleries, a new research room to facilitate access to the collections, and state-of-the-art storage areas that provide the proper climate and security for the long-term care of historical artifacts.
 
Palmer Center
The Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History houses a collection of the nations most significant golf artifacts and documents, including hundreds of items never before displayed by the USGA. The new exhibitions in the Palmer Center present the games history in a unique and original way, placing it within the context of American social, cultural, and political history.

The Arnold Palmer Center for Golf History was so named to honor the enduring connection that Arnold Palmer represents between the game and the people who play and love the game. Never before has a USGA building been dedicated to a single individual.
 
USGA Museum
The renovated USGA Museum features offices, meeting rooms, and galleries devoted to Bob Jones, Ben Hogan, and Arnold Palmer, chronicling each mans accomplishments on and off the course. It continues to serve as the main entrance for visitors.
 
Champions
The Hall of Champions celebrates every USGA champion and championship. The rotunda, illuminated by a clerestory, houses all 13 USGA championship trophies, while the name of each champion is inscribed on bronze panels that encircle the hall. The rooms quiet elegance allow visitors to reflect on the grandeur of USGA championship history. Also available throughout the main exhibition gallery are kiosks presenting a newly developed USGA championship database, allowing visitors to search every championship by player, date, and host site.
 
Galleries
Permanent galleries in the Palmer Center revolve around six iconic moments pivotal to understanding the development of golf in America. These moments include:
 
  • Francis Ouimets historic victory in the 1913 U.S. Open
  • Bob Joness Grand Slam achievement in 1930
  • The Great Depression and the democratization of golf
  • The heroic comebacks of Ben Hogan in the 1950 U.S. Open and Babe Didrikson Zaharias
    in the 1954 U.S. Womens Open
  • The rivalry between Arnold Palmer and Jack Nicklaus in the 1960 and 1962 U.S. Opens
  • Tiger Woods, the 2000 U.S. Open, and the emergence of a global game
     
    Artifacts
    The exhibitions in the new USGA Museum showcase more than 2,000 artifacts, more than twice the number on display in the old facility. The new facility displays many artifacts that have never been displayed before, representing the best of the collection.

    During the three-year period the Museum was closed, the staff had an opportunity to closely examine each collection and select artifacts that best tell the USGA story. As a result, every part of the collection is represented. Historical documents, books, scrapbooks, photographs, film footage, clothing, clubs, balls, cigarette cards, posters, medals, and trophies are all integrated into the new displays.

    Throughout the galleries, the Museums world-class collection is featured, including the clubs used by Francis Ouimet in the 1913 U.S. Open; Bob Joness famous putter, Calamity Jane II; Ben Hogans 1-iron from the 1950 U.S. Open; and artifacts from Tiger Woods, Payne Stewart, Annika Sorenstam, and many other stars of todays game.

    Prior to being placed on display, many of the artifacts and documents were sent to conservation labs to be restored and properly treated.
     
    Multimedia Exhibits
    The visitor experience is enhanced by a series of video presentations and interactive database, including:
     
    Introductory Film: A seven-minute introductory film brings visitors into the world of USGA Championships, exploring the significance and challenge of the game at its highest level. The presentation is intended to inspire visitors and prepare them to experience the Hall of Champions and the main exhibition galleries.
     
    Video presentations: Each gallery features a narrated and produced video segment to accompany the central story. These five-minute films discuss the iconic moments in greater detail, placing them in their proper historical context.
     
    Championship Database: A database of records from every USGA championship is available at kiosks located throughout the exhibition galleries. Visitors can search every championship by player, host site, and date. Narratives, scores, and photographs from every championship since 1895 are included.
     
    Video Jukeboxes: The Bob Jones Room and Arnold Palmer Room each feature a jukebox of video clips showing highlights from their careers both on and off the course. Visitors make selections from a touch-screen menu.
     
    Arnold Palmer Portrait Interactive: Gratitude, a unique portrait by California artist James David Chase, is the focus of the Arnold Palmer Room. This remarkable image comprises more than 22,000 words said by or about Arnold Palmer. A touch-screen database allows visitors to explore the portrait in a variety of ways, as well as learn how the work was created.
     
    Research Center
    A new Research Center creates an opportunity for visitors to view, study, and examine items from the collections in one area, facilitating an interdisciplinary approach to the study of golf history.
     
    Collections
    The Research Centers world-class holdings includes a library, photographic collection, film and video collection, and artifact collection. The collections document golf history and the USGAs role as the sports governing authority in the United States, its territories, and Mexico.
     
    Putting Course
    Visitors to the Museum have a unique opportunity to engage in an entertaining, participatory golf experience on a large putting green located behind the Museum. The putting green, inspired by the Himalayas putting course at St. Andrews, allows visitors to putt with replica antique clubs and balls, as well as modern equipment. Like the Himalayas at St. Andrews, this 16,000-square-foot green includes sizeable humps and swales designed to make the experience challenging and entertaining, as well as educational.

    The Putting Course is scheduled to open in September 2008. Thereafter, it will be open during Museum hours from early April to late October.
     
    Location
    On the grounds of the United States Golf Association headquarters;
    77 Liberty Corner Road in Far Hills, N.J.
     
    Hours of Operation
    Tuesday to Sunday ' 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
    Closed Monday and major holidays
     
    Research Center open weekdays; appointments encouraged:
     
    Admission
    Adults - $7
    USGA Members - $5
    Group Rate (10 or more) - $5
    Children (13 to 17 years) - $3.50
    Children (under 12) - Free
     
    Square Footage
    The historic John Russell Pope House and the Palmer Center encompass more than 33,000 square feet.
     
    Project Budget
    $19.7 million
     
    Key Staff
    Dr. Rand Jerris, Director, USGA Museum
    Doug Stark, Curator of Education and Outreach
    Nancy Stulack, Librarian
    Rosemary Maravetz, Collections Manager
    Shannon Doody, Film and Video Archivist
    Ellie Kaiser, Photo Archivist
     
    Contact
    Telephone (908) 234-2300
    Fax (980) 470-5013
    www.usgamuseum.com
     
    Related Links:
  • USGA Museum Re-Opening
     
    Copyright 2008 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
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    Murray fixes swing flaw, recovers momentum

    By Associated PressApril 20, 2018, 2:24 am

    SAN ANTONIO - Grayson Murray fixed a flaw in his swing and hit the ball well enough that blustery conditions weren't an issue for him Thursday in the Valero Texas Open.

    Coming off a missed cut at Hilton Head last week, Murray made seven birdies for a 5-under 67 and a one-shot lead. His only mistake was a double bogey from a greenside bunker on the par-3 seventh hole.

    ''Just the fact I did give myself enough opportunities today for birdie, it took a lot of pressure off,'' Murray said.

    Of the five players at 68, only Chesson Hadley played in the morning side of the draw, and he called it among his best rounds of the year because of gusts. The wind died in the afternoon and scoring improved slightly on the AT&T Oaks Course at the TPC San Antonio. Keegan Bradley, Ryan Moore, Billy Horschel and Matt Atkins each posted 68. Horschel and Moore played bogey-free.

    ''Struck the ball really well, something that we've been working hard on,'' Horschel said. ''Could have been better, yeah. I didn't really make anything out there today. But I'm happy with it.''

    Sergio Garcia, who consulted Greg Norman on the design of the course, played the Texas Open for the first time since 2010 and shot a 74. Adam Scott failed to make a birdie in his round of 75. Scott is at No. 59 in the world and needs to stay in the top 60 by May 21 to be exempt for the U.S. Open.

    Harris English was in the group at 69, while two-time Texas Open champion Zach Johnson, Nick Watney and Brandt Snedeker were among those at 70. Johnson saved his round by going 5 under over his final five holes, starting with a 12-foot eagle putt on the par-5 14th hole. He birdied the last three.


    Full-field scores from the Valero Texas Open

    Valero Texas Open: Articles, photos and videos


    Murray was coming off a pair of top 15s at Bay Hill and the Houston Open when his game got away from him last week in the RBC Heritage, and he shot 74-70 to miss the cut. He got that sorted out in the five days between teeing it up in San Antonio.

    He said he was coming down too steep, which meant he would flip his hands and hit a sharp draw or pull out of it and hit it short and right.

    ''I was hitting each club 10 yards shorter than I normally do, and you can't play like that because your caddie is trying to give you a number and a club, and you keep hitting these bad shots or keep coming up short,'' Murray said. ''I got back to the basics with the setup and the takeaway, got my club in a better position at the top, which kind of frees my downswing. Then I can start going at it.''

    Even so, Murray thought he wasted his good start - three birdies in his first six holes - when his bunker shot at No. 7 came out with no spin and rolled off the green into a deep swale. He hit his third short to about 7 feet, but missed the putt and took double bogey.

    ''I would have loved to limit that to a bogey because bogeys don't really kill you - doubles are the ones that now you've got to have an eagle or two birdies to come back with, and out here it's kind of tough to make birdies,'' Murray said. ''But I kept my head. My caddie keeps me very positive out there, that's why I think we could finish 4 under the last nine holes.''

    Only 34 players in the 156-man field managed to break par.

    Horschel missed four birdie chances inside 18 feet on the back nine. What pleased him the most was the way he struck the ball, particularly after his tie for fifth last week at the RBC Heritage. Horschel was one shot behind going into the last round and closed with a 72.

    But he's all about momentum, and he can only hope this is the start of one of his runs. Horschel won the FedEx Cup in 2014 when he finished second and won the final two playoff events.

    ''I'm a big momentum player. I've got to get the train moving forward,'' he said. ''I've always been a guy who gets on a little roll, get that train moving and jump in that winner's circle.''

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    LPGA back in L.A.: Inbee Park leads by 1

    By Associated PressApril 20, 2018, 1:53 am

    LOS ANGELES - Inbee Park's flirtation with retirement is in the rear-view mirror.

    Backed by a large contingent of South Korean fans, Park shot a 5-under 66 for a one-shot lead Thursday in the opening round of the HUGEL-JTBC LA Open in the LPGA's return to Los Angeles after a 13-year absence.

    Showers ended shortly before Park's threesome, including second-ranked Lexi Thompson, teed off at windy Wilshire Country Club just south of Hollywood.

    Using a new putter, Park birdied four consecutive holes on the back nine before a bogey on the par-4 17th. She quickly recovered and rolled in birdie putts on the second and fifth holes to finish off her round.

    ''I never played a tournament outside Korea having this much Korean supporters out,'' Park said. ''I almost feel like I'm playing back home. It's almost like a little Korea.''

    That applies to the food, too, with nearby Koreatown's restaurants beckoning.

    ''Too many,'' Park said.

    The third-ranked Park banished the blade-style putter she used in her Founders Cup victory last month in Phoenix, a playoff loss in the ANA Inspiration and a tie for third last week in Hawaii. She went back to one that feels more comfortable and has brought her success in the past.

    ''Last week was just an awkward week where I missed a lot of short ones and I just wasn't really comfortable with the putter,'' Park said, ''so I just wanted to have a different look.''

    The 29-year-old Hall of Famer recently said she was 50-50 about retiring before returning to the tour in early March after a six-month break. Momentum has been going her way ever since.

    Marina Alex was second. Thompson was one of seven players at 68 in partly sunny and unseasonable temperatures in the low 60s.


    Full-field scores from the Hugel-JTBC Open


    Alex tied Park with a birdie on No. 11. The American dropped a stroke with a bogey on the par-5 13th before rallying with a birdie on No. 14 to share the lead.

    Alex found trouble on the par-4 17th. Her ball crossed over a winding creek, bounced and then rolled into the water, leaving Alex looking for it. Eventually, she salvaged a bogey to drop a shot behind Park. After a bad tee shot on 18, Alex managed a par to close at 67.

    ''I made a lot of the putts that I shouldn't, I wouldn't have expected to make,'' she said. ''I made two great saves on 17 and 18. Kind of got away with some not-so-solid golf shots in the beginning, and I capitalized on some great putts.''

    Thompson returned from a two-week break after finishing tied for 20th at the ANA Inspiration, the year's first major.

    She bogeyed her second hole, the par-4, 401-yard 11th, before settling down and birdieing four of the next eight holes, including the 14th, 15th and 16th.

    ''I changed a little thing that slipped my mind that I was working on earlier in the year,'' said Thompson, declining to share the change in her putting technique. ''I don't want to jinx it.''

    ANA winner Pernilla Lundberg was among those in the logjam after a 68.

    Natalie Gulbis was among five players tied for 10th at 69. Playing sparingly the last two years, Gulbis put together a round that included four birdies and two bogeys.

    Top-ranked Shanshan Feng struggled to a 74 with five bogeys and two birdies.

    The venerable course with views of the Hollywood sign and Griffith Observatory wasn't any kinder to eighth-ranked Cristie Kerr and Michelle Wie.

    Both had up-and-down rounds that included three bogeys and a double-bogey on No. 10 for Kerr and five bogeys, including three in a row, for Wie. Wie, ranked 14th, had a few putts that lipped out.

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    Horschel (68) builds on momentum at Valero

    By Will GrayApril 20, 2018, 12:32 am

    Billy Horschel only ever needs to see a faint glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel.

    While some players require a slow ascent from missed cuts to contending on the weekend, Horschel's switches between the two can often be drastic. Last year he missed three straight cuts before defeating Jason Day in a playoff to win the AT&T Byron Nelson, a turnaround that Horschel said "still shocks me to this day."

    The veteran is at it again, having missed five of six cuts prior to last week's RBC Heritage. But a few tweaks quickly produced results, as Horschel tied for fifth at Harbour Town. He wasted no time in building on that momentum with a bogey-free, 4-under 68 to open the Valero Texas Open that left him one shot behind Grayson Murray.

    "I'm a big momentum player. I've got to get the train moving forward," Horschel told reporters Thursday. "I've always been a guy who gets on a little roll, get that train moving and jump into the winner's circle. So yeah, it would have been great to win last week, but it was just nice to play four really good rounds of golf."


    Full-field scores from the Valero Texas Open

    Valero Texas Open: Articles, photos and videos


    Many big names tend to skip this week's stop at TPC San Antonio, but Horschel has managed to thrive on the difficult layout in recent years. He finished third in both 2013 and 2015, and tied for fourth in 2016.

    With a return next week to the Zurich Classic of New Orleans where he notched his first career win in 2013 and a title defense in Dallas on the horizon, Horschel believes he's turning things around at just the right time.

    "Gets the momentum going, carry it into this week, next week, which I've had a lot of success at," Horschel said. "Really the rest of the year, from here on in I have a lot of really good events I've played well in."

    Getty Images

    Three years later, PXG launches new iron

    By Golf Channel DigitalApril 19, 2018, 11:22 pm

    Three years is a long time between launches of club lines, but Bob Parsons, founder and CEO of PXG, says his company had a very good reason for waiting that long to introduce its second-generation irons.

    “Three years ago, when we introduced our first generation 0311 iron, we made a commitment that we would not release a product unless it was significantly better than our existing product,” Parsons said. “:Our GEN2 irons are better than our GEN1 irons in every respect. We believe it’s the best iron ever made, and the second-best iron ever made is our GEN1 iron.”

    PXG’s 0311 GEN2 irons, which officially went on sale today, feature what the company says is the world’s thinnest clubface. They have a forged 8620 soft carbon steel body and PXG’s signature weighting technology. The hollow clubheads are filled with a new polymer material that PXG says not only dampens vibration, but also produces higher ball speeds and thus more distance.

    The irons come in four “collections” – Tour Performance, Players, Xtreme Forgiveness and Super Game Improvement.

    Cost is $400 per iron, or $500 for PXG’s “Extreme Dark” finish. Price includes custom fitting. For more information, visit www.pxg.com.