Woods looks to stay hot at Greenbrier Classic

By Associated PressJuly 4, 2012, 7:50 pm

WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, W.Va. – A short ride to Sam Snead's playground is what Tiger Woods considers a good way to get ready for the British Open.

Woods traveled 250 miles for his debut in The Greenbrier Classic on Thursday, a week after his two-shot win at the AT&T National he hosts in Bethesda, Md.

The quick trip to the Old White TPC Course, along with memories of the late Snead's stories about his 47-year association with the historic Greenbrier resort, helped make Woods' decision to compete in the 3-year-old tournament an easy one.

''This tournament since its inception has been absolutely incredible,'' Woods said. ''I knew about the history of (the resort) from Sam and how much he loved coming here and loved being here.''

The place might grow on Woods, too, if he can get his fourth victory this season and moves within seven of Snead's record 82 PGA Tour wins.

Despite their age difference, Woods and Snead struck up a friendship, which was born at a golf outing near Los Angeles when Woods was 5. Snead played with a new group every two holes and Woods happened to be in the final one, making a pair of bogeys to Snead's two pars.

''I still have the card at home,'' Woods said.

Throughout the years, Woods and Snead had ''countless dinners and conversations, and he was always so funny to be around and the stories he would tell and the needling – the needling was nonstop,'' Woods said. ''That was one of the neat things about Sam.''

It was at The Greenbrier where Snead got his first professional job in the mid-1930s. He was the resort's golf pro until 1974 and returned as pro emeritus in 1993. Five years later he realized a lifelong dream of establishing a golf academy.

Snead died in 2002, leaving behind a clubhouse filled with his trophies, photos and other treasures.

Like Snead, Tom Watson has a long-lasting relationship with The Greenbrier. Watson's began at the 1979 Ryder Cup, but his stay was shortened by the birth of his first child. He liked the place so much that the next year, he started bringing sponsors and business associates to the resort.

Watson was named pro emeritus in 2005. He'll be playing in his second PGA event of the year, the other being the Masters.

The 1994 Solheim Cup was the last major event held at the resort until Jim Justice bought it out of bankruptcy in 2009 and started the Greenbrier Classic the following year.

Once a gathering place for royalty and presidents, the resort is advertised to players as a family friend atmosphere with everything they'd need on site - a 721-room hotel, a spa, restaurants and dozens of other amenities from bowling to falconry.

''I think what sold it to me was watching it on TV and then seeing how much the players really enjoyed it,'' Woods said. ''I wanted to play in it last year because it fit in my schedule, but I was hurt. That was disappointing, but this year again it worked out perfectly.

''It's close to D.C. A lot of guys are driving here from D.C. On top of that, you get a week off after this to get ready for the British. Some guys may go over there to play the week before the British. At least we have that option. I think that's one reason why the field is so strong here.''

The British Open will be played in two weeks at Royal Lytham and St. Annes.

Six golfers ranked in the top 20 in the world are at The Greenbrier, compared to two last year.

Woods will play alongside U.S. Open champion Webb Simpson and Steve Stricker in the first two rounds. Simpson led last year's Greenbrier Classic with nine holes left before fading to a tie for ninth.

Stricker's wife, Nicki, will carry his bag just as she did early in his career before having children. His regular caddie was given the week off because Stricker was a late addition to the Greenbrier field. Stricker is 14th in Ryder Cup points and hopes to make the U.S. team that will compete against Europe on Sept. 28-30 at Medinah. Stricker will go after his fourth straight John Deere Classic title next week in Silvis, Ill.

Phil Mickelson, who called conditions on Old White ''brutally difficult'' last year and missed the cut, will play Thursday and Friday alongside 2011 winner Scott Stallings and 2010 champion Stuart Appleby, who shot 59 in the final round to beat Jeff Overton by a stroke.

Last week's powerful wind storm damaged as many as 80 trees on Old White. One of them fell onto the back edge of the 16th green and knocked down a set of bleachers.

Volunteers and resort staff helped clear debris over the weekend.

''Just the amount of time and manpower it took to clean it up was amazing, absolutely amazing,'' Watson said. ''Sunday, it looked like it always has looked.''

The Greenbrier is known for its once-secret underground bunker built for Congress in case of nuclear attack during the Cold War. Justice said the bunker's vast emergency power system came in handy after the storm.

More than 680,000 customers in West Virginia lost power. Those outages were cut in half by midweek and Justice applauded utility company efforts to restore service to businesses catering to golf fans this week.

''You could have had an incredible disaster,'' Justice said. ''If you had had 300,000 people here and they couldn't get gas and they couldn't move and everything, and 100 degrees outside, you would have had a super disaster.

''So in a lot of ways, we have been very blessed.''

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McIlroy responds to Harmon's 'robot' criticism

By Mercer BaggsJuly 20, 2018, 6:53 am

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Rory McIlroy said during his pre-championship news conference that he wanted to play more "carefree" – citing Jon Rahm’s approach now and the way McIlroy played in his younger days.

McIlroy got off to a good start Thursday at Carnoustie, shooting 2-under 69, good for a share of eighth place.

But while McIlroy admits to wanting to be a little less structured on the course, he took offense to comments made by swing coach Butch Harmon during a Sky Sports telecast.

Said Harmon:

“Rory had this spell when he wasn’t putting good and hitting the ball good, and he got so wrapped up in how he was going to do it he forgot how to do it.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


“He is one of the best players the game has ever seen. If he would just go back to being a kid and playing the way he won these championships and play your game, don’t have any fear or robotic thoughts. Just play golf. Just go do it.

“This is a young kid who’s still one of the best players in the world. He needs to understand that. Forget about your brand and your endorsement contracts. Forget about all that. Just go back to having fun playing golf. I still think he is one of the best in the world and can be No.1 again if he just lets himself do it.”

McIlroy, who has never worked with Harmon, responded to the comments when asked about them following his opening round.

“Look, I like Butch. Definitely, I would say I'm on the opposite end of the spectrum than someone that's mechanical and someone that's – you know, it's easy to make comments when you don't know what's happening,” McIlroy said. “I haven't spoken to Butch in a long time. He doesn't know what I'm working on in my swing. He doesn't know what's in my head. So it's easy to make comments and easy to speculate. But unless you actually know what's happening, I just really don't take any notice of it.”

McIlroy second round at The Open began at 2:52 a.m. ET.

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How The Open cut line is determined

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 20, 2018, 5:57 am

Scores on Day 1 of the 147th Open Championship ranged from 5-under 66 to 11-over 82.

The field of 156 players will be cut nearly in half for weekend play at Carnoustie. Here’s how the cut line works in the season’s third major championship:


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


• After 36 holes, the low 70 players and ties will advance to compete in the final two rounds. Anyone finishing worse than that will get the boot. Only those making the cut earn official money from the $10.5 million purse.

• There is no 10-shot rule. That rule means anyone within 10 shots of the lead after two rounds, regardless of where they stand in the championship, make the cut. It’s just a flat top 70 finishers and ties.

• There is only a single cut at The Open. PGA Tour events employ an MDF (Made cut Did not Finish) rule, which narrows the field after the third round if more than 78 players make the cut. That is not used at this major.

The projected cut line after the first round this week was 1 over par, which included 71 players tied for 50th or better.

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The Open 101: A guide to the year's third major

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 20, 2018, 5:30 am

Take a look at some answers to frequently asked questions about The Open:

What's all this "The Open" stuff? I thought it was the British Open.

What you call it has historically depended on where you were. If you were in the U.S., you called it the British Open, just as Europeans refer to the PGA Championship as the U.S. PGA. Outside the U.S. it generally has been referred to as The Open Championship. The preferred name of the organizers is The Open.

How old is it?

It's the oldest golf championship, dating back to 1860.

Where is it played?

There is a rotation – or "rota" – of courses used. Currently there are 10: Royal Birkdale, Royal St. George's, Royal Liverpool and Royal Lytham and St. Annes, all in England; Royal Portrush in Northern Ireland and St. Andrews, Carnoustie, Royal Troon, Turnberry and Muirfield, all in Scotland. Muirfield was removed from the rota in 2016 when members voted against allowing female members, but when the vote was reversed in 2017 it was allowed back in.

Where will it be played this year?

At Carnoustie, which is located on the south-eastern shore of Scotland.

Who has won The Open on that course?

Going back to the first time Carnoustie hosted, in 1931, winners there have been Tommy Armour, Henry Cotton (1937), Ben Hogan (1953), Gary Player (1968), Tom Watson (1975), Paul Lawrie (1999), Padraig Harrington (2007).

Wasn't that the year Hogan nearly won the Slam?

Yep. He had won the Masters and U.S. Open that season, then traveled to Carnoustie and won that as well. It was the only time he ever played The Open. He was unable to play the PGA Championship that season because the dates conflicted with those of The Open.

Jean Van de Velde's name should be on that list, right?

This is true. He had a three-shot lead on the final hole in 1999 and made triple bogey. He lost in a playoff to Lawrie, which also included Justin Leonard.

Who has won this event the most?

Harry Vardon, who was from the Channel Island of Jersey, won a record six times between 1896 and 1914. Australian Peter Thomson, American Watson, Scot James Braid and Englishman J.H. Taylor each won five times.

What about the Morrises?

Tom Sr. won four times between 1861 and 1867. His son, Tom Jr., also won four times, between 1868 and 1872.

Have players from any particular country dominated?

In the early days, Scots won the first 29 Opens – not a shocker since they were all played at one of three Scottish courses, Prestwick, St. Andrews and Musselburgh. In the current era, going back to 1999 (we'll explain why that year in a minute), the scoreboard is United States, nine wins; South Africa, three wins; Ireland, two wins; Northern Ireland, two wins; and Sweden, one win. The only Scot to win in that period was Lawrie, who took advantage of one of the biggest collapses in golf history.

Who is this year's defending champion?

That would be American Jordan Spieth, who survived an adventerous final round to defeat Matt Kuchar by three strokes and earn the third leg of the career Grand Slam.

What is the trophy called?

The claret jug. It's official name is the Golf Champion Trophy, but you rarely hear that used. The claret jug replaced the original Challenge Belt in 1872. The winner of the claret jug gets to keep it for a year, then must return it (each winner gets a replica to keep).

Which Opens have been the most memorable?

Well, there was Palmer in 1961and '62; Van de Velde's collapse in 1999; Hogan's win in 1953; Tiger Woods' eight-shot domination of the 2000 Open at St. Andrews; Watson almost winning at age 59 in 2009; Doug Sanders missing what would have been a winning 3-foot putt at St. Andrews in 1970; Tony Jacklin becoming the first Briton to win the championship in 18 years; and, of course, the Duel in the Sun at Turnberry in 1977, in which Watson and Jack Nicklaus dueled head-to-head over the final 36 holes, Watson winning by shooting 65-65 to Nicklaus' 65-66.

When I watch this tournament on TV, I hear lots of unfamiliar terms, like "gorse" and "whin" and "burn." What do these terms mean?

Gorse is a prickly shrub, which sometimes is referred to as whin. Heather is also a shrub. What the scots call a burn, would also be considered a creek or stream.

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How to watch The Open on TV and online

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 20, 2018, 5:30 am

You want to watch the 147th Open? Here’s how you can do it.

Golf Channel and NBC Sports will be televising 182 hours of overall programming from the men's third major of the year at Carnoustie

In addition to the traditional coverage, the two networks will showcase three live alternate feeds: marquee groups, featured holes (our new 3-hole channel) and spotlight action. You can also watch replays of full-day coverage, Thursday-Sunday, in the Golf Channel app, NBC Sports apps, and on GolfChannel.com.  

Here’s the weekly TV schedule, with live stream links in parentheses. You can view all the action on the Golf Channel mobile, as well. Alternate coverage is noted in italics:

(All times Eastern; GC=Golf Channel; NBC=NBC Sports; GC.com=GolfChannel.com or check the GLE app)

Monday, July 16

GC: 7-9AM: Morning Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: 9-11AM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)

GC: 7-9PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Tuesday, July 17

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Wednesday, July 18

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Thursday, July 19

GC: Midnight-1:30AM: Midnight Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: Day 1: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Friday, July 20

GC: Day 2: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Saturday, July 21

GC: Day 3: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 3: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 3-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Sunday, July 22

GC: Day 4: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 4: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 2:30-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)