Improve Your Game Every Day

By David BreslowJanuary 19, 2005, 5:00 pm
Do you get to play as much golf as youd like? Do you live in a cold weather climate that doesnt allow you to play golf as often as youd like? Do outside obligations prevent you from playing as much golf as youd like?
 
Wellunless youre a playing professional, lifes every day obligations may restrict the number of rounds you get to play. Even so, this does not mean your game has to suffer. You can improve your game whether youre actually hitting balls or not. Often times Im asked by clients how to improve play ON the course. My response sometimes surprises them. I tell them they can develop the key performance skills both on and OFF the course. Of course, there is no substitute for playing the game but this does not mean the key performance traits can only be developed while on the course.
 
Top performers develop their overall games off the course as much as on. By developing your all around game off the course you create a longer term process that becomes something you can transfer on to the course more easily. Developing your key skills off the course creates a feeling of confidence and builds a stronger foundation. One big trap amateur golfers slip into is trying to turn it on when they get to the course. Sometimes it works and sometimes it does not. Why rely on something so inconsistent?
 
No matter what climate you live in or what your outside obligations; you can develop your mechanical and mental skills away from the game. Here are some ideas to consider to help develop your key Performance traits:
 
1. Create Mini-Routines
Whether youre putting on the carpet in your living room or hitting balls at your local range, try to implement a mini ritual. Rituals and routines are often taken for granted. When done properly, they are designed to set you up for success. Its been my experience that the majority of golfers do not use routines that are highly effective in triggering success without realizing it. Develop a mini routine that gets you mentally, emotionally and physically ready to succeed over every shot.
 
2. Train Your Body To Relax
I believe stress and muscle tension are responsible for the majority of errors made in sports. Simply put: tight muscles translate into poor mechanics. Tight muscles reduce flexibility and fluidity of the golf swing. They also restrict the flow of energy in your body which reduces power.
 
Triggering relaxation and reduced muscle tension is something that can be done every day. By practicing yoga, breathing exercises, taichi , meditation or any other form of deep relaxation you can train the body to return to that open and relaxed state. The more you train it; the more it begins to show up on the course.
 
3. Sharpen Your Focus
Sharpening mental focus is also something that can be successfully achieved off the golf course. Golf, as in life, is a matter of controlling mental attention and this is a skill that can be strengthened every day. The deep relaxation exercises listed above are also great methods to increase focus. Real concentration becomes effortless when you practice every day. For many golfers, concentration can be work and even tiring. Pure focus is not tiring. It is something that causes you to gain energy rather than lose it.
 
Away from the course try this simple exercise: place a lit candle 2 feet away from you at eye level. Sit comfortably and gaze at the flame for 2 minutes. Your task is to completely absorb your attention on the flame. As you do this you may notice mental noise wanting your attention. No matter what distraction you hear, simply bring your attention back to the flame no matter how many times you have to do it! This is a terrific exercise that allows you to direct your own attention and at the same time, remain open and absorbed on a single object (in this case the flame).
 
The Challenge
The challenge for many golfers is NOT in knowing these things are important but in actually DOING something about them. There is one fundamental truth that remains: in order to improve your game you must DO something; take action on something and do it on a regular basis. What we do on a regular basis becomes a habit over time. Are your habits helping or hurting your game? All of these skills are developed as part of the FlowZone Golf program and when people formally develop them they tend to see results.
 
Start improving your game every day!
 
Note: The FlowZone TeleCourse dates and times are now set up. Classes are set to begin in February. You also have the option of taking the class you want either during the week or on the weekend. To receive a complete course listing, dates, times and very reasonable fees; email: David@theflowzone.net. Class sizes are limited!
 
Related Links:
  • David Breslow Article Archive
     
    Copyright 2005 David Breslow. David is the author of Wired To Win and offers a highly acclaimed FlowZone program: Your Resilience Factor: Adapt and Excel in any Environment Workshop and TeleCourse that takes performance to the next level. David has appeared on The Golf Channel, ESPN radio, etc. For more programs/services/products or sign up for a free newsletter (write newsletter in subject box). Contact: David Breslow 847.681.1698 Email: David@theflowzone.net or visit the web: www.theflowzone.net For book orders call toll free: 1.888.280.7715
  • Getty Images

    Snedeker joins 59 club at Wyndham

    By Will GrayAugust 16, 2018, 4:19 pm

    Brandt Snedeker opened the Wyndham Championship with an 11-under 59, becoming just the ninth player in PGA Tour history to card a sub-60 score in a tournament round.

    Snedeker offered an excited fist pump after rolling in a 20-footer for birdie on the ninth hole at Sedgefield Country Club, his 18th hole of the day. It was Snedeker's 10th birdie on the round to go along with a hole-out eagle from 176 yards on No. 6 and gave him the first 59 on Tour since Adam Hadwin at last year's CareerBuilder Challenge.

    Snedeker's round eclipsed the tournament and course record of 60 at Sedgefield, most recently shot by Si Woo Kim en route to victory two years ago. Amazingly, the round could have been even better: he opened with a bogey on No. 10 and missed a 6-footer for birdie on his 17th hole of the day.


    Full-field scores from Wyndham Championship

    Wyndham Championship: Articles, photos and videos


    Snedeker was still 1 over on the round before reeling off four straight birdies on Nos. 13-16, but he truly caught fire on the front nine where he shot an 8-under 27 that included five birdie putts from inside 6 feet.

    Jim Furyk, who also shot 59, holds the 18-hole scoring record on Tour with a 58 in the final round of the 2016 Travelers Championship.

    Snedeker told reporters this week that he was suffering from "kind of paralysis by analysis" at last week's PGA Championship, but he began to simplify things over the weekend when he shot 69-69 at Bellerive to tie for 42nd. Those changes paid off even moreso Thursday in Greensboro, where Snedeker earned his first career Tour win back in 2007 at nearby Forest Oaks.

    "Felt like I kind of found something there for a few days and was able to put the ball where I wanted to and make some putts," Snedeker said. "And all of a sudden everything starts feeling a little bit better. So excited about that this week because the greens are so good."

    Snedeker was hampered by injury at the end of 2017 and got off to a slow start this season. But his form has started to pick up over the summer, as he has recorded three top-10 finishes over his last seven starts highlighted by a T-3 finish last month at The Greenbrier. He entered the week 80th in the season-long points race and is in search of his first win since the 2016 Farmers Insurance Open.

    Getty Images

    Woods' caddie paid heckler $25 to go away

    By Will GrayAugust 16, 2018, 4:05 pm

    Tiger Woods is known for his ability to tune out hecklers while in the midst of a competitive round, but every now and then a fan is able to get under his skin - or, at least, his caddie's.

    Joe LaCava has been on the bag for Woods since 2011, and on a recent appearance on ESPN's "Golic and Wingo" he shared a story of personally dispatching of an especially persistent heckler after dipping into his wallet earlier this month at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational.

    According to LaCava, the fan was vocal throughout Woods' final round at Firestone Country Club, where he eventually tied for 31st. On the 14th hole, LaCava asked him to go watch another group, and the man agreed - under the condition that LaCava pony up with some cash.

    "So he calls me a couple of names, and I go back and forth with the guy. And I said, 'Why don't you just leave?'" LaCava said. "And he goes, 'Well, if you give me $25 for the ticket that I bought today, I'll leave.' And I said, 'Here you go, here's $25.'"

    But the apparent resolution was brief, as the heckler pocketed the cash but remained near the rope line. At that point, the exchange between LaCava and the fan became a bit more heated.

    "I said, 'Look, pal, $25 is $25. You've got to head the other way,'" LaCava said. "So he starts to head the other way, goes 20 yards down the line, and he calls me a certain other swear word. So I run 20 yards back the other way. We’re going face-to-face with this guy and all of a sudden Tiger is looking for a yardage and I’m in it with this guy 20 yards down the line.”

    Eventually an on-course police officer intervened, and the cash-grabbing fan was ultimately ejected. According to LaCava, Woods remained unaffected by the situation that played out a few yards away from him.

    "He didn't have a problem," LaCava said. "And actually, I got a standing ovation for kicking the guy out of there."

    Getty Images

    Highlights: Snedeker's closing blitz to 59

    By Golf Channel DigitalAugust 16, 2018, 3:45 pm

    Brandt Snedeker's first round at the Wyndham Championship began with a bogey and ended with a birdie for an 11-under 59.

    Snedeker made four consecutive birdies on his opening nine holes and then raced home in 27 strokes to become the ninth different player in PGA Tour history to break the 60 barrier.

    A very good round turned historic beginning when he holed a 7-iron from 176 yards, on the fly, for an eagle-2 at the par-4 sixth. Playing his 15th hole of the day, Snedeker vaulted to 9 under par for the tournament.



    With Sedgefield being a par 70, Snedeker needed two birdies over his final three holes to shoot 59 and he got one of them at the par-3 seventh, where he hit his tee shot on the 224-yard hole to 2 feet.



    Snedeker actually had 58 in his crosshairs, but missed an 6-foot slider for birdie at the par-4 eighth.



    Still, 59 was on the table and he needed this 20-foot putt to shoot it.


    At 11 under par, Snedeker led the tournament by five strokes.

    Getty Images

    Rosaforte Report: A tale of two comebacks

    By Tim RosaforteAugust 16, 2018, 2:15 pm

    Comeback (noun): A return by a well-known person, especially an entertainer or sports player, to the activity in which they have formerly been successful.

    Even by definition, the word comeback is subjective.

    There is no question that Brooks Koepka has completed his comeback. With two major championship victories that encompassed wins over Dustin Johnson and Tiger Woods, Player of the Year honors have all but been locked up for the 2017-18 season.

    But knowing Koepka, he wants more. A No. 1 ranking, topping his boy D.J., is a possibility and a goal. A Ryder Cup is awaiting. By all rights, Koepka could be Comeback Player of the Year and Player of the Year all in one, except the PGA Tour discontinued its Comeback honor in 2012. Even without an official award, the conversation comes down to the two athletes that hugged it out after finishing 1-2 at Bellerive.

    What Woods has recovered from is remarkable, but not complete. He hasn’t won yet. With triumphs in the U.S. Open and PGA Championship, Koepka has completed his comeback from a pair of wrist injuries that could have been equally as career-ending as the physical issues that Woods had to overcome just to contend in the last two majors.

    “There was a question on whether or not I’d ever be the same,” Koepka said Sunday night in the media center at Bellerive, following his third major championship victory in six tries. “Whether I could do it pain-free, we had no idea.”



    The wrist traumas occured five months apart, with the initial issue, which occured at the Hero World Challenge in December (in which he finished last in the limited field), putting him in a soft cast with a partially torn tendon. That cost the reigning U.S. Open champion 15 weeks on the shelf (and couch), including a start in the Masters.

    His treatment included injecting bone marrow and platelet-rich plasma. When he returned at the Zurich Classic in April, Koepka revealed the ligaments that hold the tendon in place were gone – thus a dislocation – and that every time he went to his doctor, “it seemed like it got worse and worse.”

    Koepka’s second wrist injury of the season occurred on the practice grounds at The Players, when a cart pulled in front of Koepka just as he was accelerating into the ball with his 120-plus mph club-head speed. Abruptly stopping his swing, Koepka’s left wrist popped out. His physio, Marc Wahl, relayed a story to PGA Tour radio in which he advised Koepka before he reset the wrist: “Sit on your hand and bite this towel, otherwise you’re going to punch me.”

    Koepka admitted that he never dreamed such a scenario would threaten his career. He called it, “probably the most painful thing I’ve ever gone through, setting that bone back.” But, testament to Koepka's fortitude, four days later he made an albatross and tied a TPC Sawgrass course record, shooting 63.

    Woods’ physical – and mental – recovery from back surgery and prescription drug abuse was painful and career threatening in its own way. As he said in his return to Augusta, “Those are some really, really dark times. I’m a walking miracle.”

    As miraculous as it has been, Woods, by definition, still hasn’t fully completed his comeback. While he’s threatened four times in 2018, he hasn’t won a tournament.

    Yes, it’s a miracle that he’s gotten this far, swinging the club that fast, without any relapse in his back. As electric and high-energy as his second-place finish to Koepka was at the PGA, Woods has made this winning moment something to anticipate. As story lines go, it may be better this way.

    Coming off a flat weekend at the WGC-Bridgestone, Woods was starting to sound like an old 42-year-old. But instead of ice baths and recovery time, the conversation was charged by what he did on Saturday and Sunday in the 100th PGA.

    A day later, there was more good news. With Woods committing to three straight weeks of FedExCup Playoff golf, potentially followed by a week off and then the Tour Championship, that moment of victory may not be far away.

    Scheduling – and certainly anticipating – four tournaments in five weeks, potentially followed by a playing role at the Ryder Cup, would indicate that Woods has returned to the activity in which he was formally successful.

    There were times post-scandal and post-back issues, that Woods stuck by the lines made famous by LL Cool J:

    Don’t call it a comeback
    I’ve been here for years
    I’m rocking my peers

    Not this time. As he said Sunday before his walk-off 64 in St, Louis, “Oh, God. I didn’t even know if I was going to play again.”