Sending Mixed Messages

By David BreslowOctober 26, 2005, 4:00 pm
You send yourself messages all the time on and off the golf course. The things you think about and the words you say all have an impact on you mentally, physically and emotionally because of the amazing wiring system we all have. If you think I cant hit this shot youve sent that message to all the parts of yourself. If you think Im no good the wiring sends that message to yourself as well.
 
The program I deliver for athletes and business is called Wired To Win because it reflects the reality that the mind, body and emotions are connected through a wired communication system. This wiring connects these elements just like the cable that hooks you up to the internet. The cable is the medium that works constantly to keep us connected to the internet however, its just a vehicle that keeps the connection going. How we use the connection is up to us. The wiring inside us is also the vehicle that hooks us up and the information and messages we send are up to us as well.
 
Unfortunately, too often, instead of sending clear messages we send mixed messages causing us to feel doubt, lack confidence or to not enjoy ourselves as much as wed like to. For example, Try hard but relax is one form of a mixed message that has many golfers tied up in knots over the ball. Can you see how much of a mixed message this is? The command to try hard causes many golfers to tighten up and lose rhythm. Combine that with the message relax and now youve got two opposing messages waging a battle to be the winner.
 
Another common mixed message is, have fun but dont try so hard! This is something many junior golfers (and juniors in many other sports as well) hear quite a lot from coaches and parents. Cmon try harder out there is often followed by Just take it easy...dont try so hard! when the player struggles and begins to over try and become frustrated. Imagine the confusion this causes inside you. The mind is trying to process the commands youre giving it and send the messages through the system but there is a problem. The two opposing commands create a glitch in the messaging process. Which one does it choose, which one does it process? When faced with this situation the result is often neutral with no clear winner. This will always cause us to experience doubt, confusion and a lack of clarity and commitment.
 
You already have this tremendous wiring system all set up to produce results for you. Theres nothing you need to add to it. This is one of the basic principles in the Wired To Win approach and is one example of how the laws and principles operate in everyone at all times. When people see the reality of these laws they tend to make faster shifts toward improvement. The real question becomes: are you sending mixed messages or clear messages through the wiring?
 
Here are some helpful ways to discover this for yourself:
  • Pay close attention to what you say to yourself prior to hitting the ball...got to have this / relax or cmon focus, focus / take it easy slow down

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  • Become aware of certain thoughts that seem to pop up out of habit and notice whether they create a mixed message or a clear message

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  • Use a journal to record the kinds of mixed messages you may be sending yourself and write down how your play is affected
NOTE: If you are interested in presentations for your team, club or organization (business or sports) let us know. David is setting his presentation / workshop / travel schedule for the next 4 months. All presentations include specific insights and strategies to create shifts in how people perform. Also, further discounts are available for the 3 session introductory 1 on 1 phone You must register by Oct. 31 2005 . Contact David@theflowzone.net to receive further information on any of the above.
 
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    Copyright 2005 David Breslow. David is the author of Wired To Win and offers the highly acclaimed Wired To Win programs for athletes and business/sales professionals to help them perform at the top of their game!. His unique approach helps people make quantum leap shifts! David has appeared on The Golf Channel, ESPN radio, etc. For more programs/services/products or sign up for a free newsletter (write newsletter in subject box). Contact: David Breslow 847.681.1698 Email: David@theflowzone.net or visit the web: www.theflowzone.net. For book orders call toll free: 1.888.280.7715.
     
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    Expired visa, helicopter, odd clubs all part of Vegas' journey

    By Ryan LavnerJuly 19, 2018, 3:48 pm

    CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Jhonattan Vegas thought someone was playing a practical joke on him.

    Or maybe he was stuck in the middle of a horror movie.

    Scheduled to leave for The Open a week ago, he didn’t arrive at Carnoustie until a little more than an hour before his first-round tee time Thursday.

    “Even if somebody tried to do that on purpose,” he said, “you couldn’t really do it.”

    The problem was an expired visa.

    Vegas said that he must have gotten confused by the transposed date on the visa – “Guessing I’ve been living in America too long” – and assumed that he was cleared to travel.

    No problem, he was told. He’d have a new visa in 24 hours.


    Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

    Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


    Except the consulate in New York didn’t respond to his application the next day, keeping him in limbo through the weekend. Then, on Monday, he was told that he’d applied for the wrong visa. UPS got shut down in New York and his visa never left, so Vegas waited in vain for seven hours in front of the consulate in Houston. He finally secured his visa on Wednesday morning, boarded a flight from Houston to Toronto, and then flew to Glasgow, the final leg of a 14-hour journey.

    His agent arranged a helicopter ride from Glasgow to Carnoustie to ensure that he could make his 10:31 a.m. (local) tee time.

    One more issue? His clubs never made it. They were left back in Toronto.

    His caddie, Ruben Yorio, scrambled to put together a new bag, with a mismatched set of woods, irons, wedges and putter.

    “Luckily the (equipment) vans are still here,” Vegas said. “Otherwise I probably would have played with members’ clubs today.”

    He hit about 20 balls on the range – “Luckily they were going forward” – but Carnoustie is one of the most challenging links in the world, and Vegas was working off of two hours’ sleep and without his own custom-built clubs. He shot 76 but, hey, at least he tried.

    “It was fun,” he said, “even though the journey was frustrating.”

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    'Brain fart' leads to Spieth's late collapse

    By Rex HoggardJuly 19, 2018, 2:44 pm

    CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – The closing stretch at Carnoustie has famously ruined many a solid round, so Jordan Spieth’s misadventures on Thursday should not have been a complete surprise, but the truth is the defending champion’s miscues were very much self-inflicted.

    Spieth was cruising along at 3 under par, just two shots off the early lead, when he made a combination of errors at the par-4 15th hole. He hit the wrong club off the tee (4-iron) and the wrong club for his approach (6-iron) on his way to a double bogey-6.

    “The problem was on the second shot, I should have hit enough club to reach the front of the green, and even if it goes 20 yards over the green, it's an easy up-and-down,” Spieth said. “I just had a brain fart, and I missed it into the location where the only pot bunker where I could actually get in trouble, and it plugged deep into it. It was a really, really poor decision on the second shot, and that cost me.”


    Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

    Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


    Spieth continued to compound his problems with a sloppy bogey at the 16th hole, and a drive that sailed left at 18 found the Barry Burn en route to a closing bogey and a 1-over 72.

    The miscues were more mental, a lack of execution, than they were an example of how difficult the closing stretch at Carnoustie can be, and that’s not good enough for Spieth.

    “That's what I would consider as a significant advantage for me is recognizing where the misses are,” said Spieth, who was tied for 68th when he completed his round. “It felt like a missed opportunity.”

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    Perez: R&A does it right, 'not like the USGA'

    By Rex HoggardJuly 19, 2018, 2:28 pm

    CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Pat Perez didn’t even attempt to hide his frustration with the USGA at last month’s U.S. Open, and after an opening-round 69 at The Open, he took the opportunity to double down on his displeasure.

    “They (the R&A) do it right, not like the USGA,” Perez said of the setup at Carnoustie. “They've got the opposite [philosophy] here. I told them, you guys have it right, let the course get baked, but you've got the greens receptive. They're not going to run and be out of control. They could have easily had the greens just like the fairway, but they didn't. The course is just set up perfect.”


    Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

    Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


    Concerns at Shinnecock Hills reached a crescendo on Saturday when the scoring average ballooned to 75.3 and only three players broke the par of 70. Of particular concern for many players, including Perez, were some of the hole locations, given how fast and firm the greens were.

    “The U.S. Open could have been like this more if they wanted to. They could have made the greens a bit more receptive,” Perez said. “These greens are really flat compared to Shinnecock. So that was kind of the problem there is they let it get out of control and they made the greens too hard.”