Public Access Whistling Straits - COPIED

By Erik PetersonDecember 13, 2010, 8:53 pm
KOHLER, Wis. – If a plumber said he planned to build a golf resort in Wisconsin that would rival Pebble Beach, he’d be laughed out of the room. Fifteen years ago Herb Kohler, the venerable president of Kohler Company, had such a vision and this summer the Straits Course at his beloved Whistling Straits is already hosting its second PGA Championship.

Not bad for a cheesehead.

In addition to bold, the Straits is all things a championship course should be: Scenic and demanding, with a dozen or more holes that make you say, “Wow.”

Despite its glory, however, perhaps its most important characteristic is that it’s open to the public. In fact, this summer, for the first time in history, the U.S. Open, Open Championship and PGA Championship all take place at venues open to the public.

Whether you’re a PGA Tour star, a middle-aged couple from Toronto, or a quadriplegic who’s a nearby resident, Whistling Straits is your golf course. But before being introduced to the people who enjoy visiting Whistling Straits, you need to know about Pete Dye, the crazy man who built it.

When Kohler approached Dye about designing Whistling Straits he asked him to do what Dye does best:  The impossible. The site, an abandoned 560-acre airfield along Lake Michigan, was a flat wasteland that looked more like the surface of the moon than PGA Championship staples like Southern Hills or Medinah.

That is, until Dye got his hands on it.

'I should say this with some degree of modesty. But in my lifetime I've never seen anything like this. Anyplace. Period,' Dye gushed in 1998 prior to the opening of the Straits Course.

Amazing what an unlimited budget and 13,000 truckloads of sand can do for you.

“Pete Dye has always made the most of the glorious possibilities that the land affords,” Kohler said. “He is nature’s best collaborator and this time, he has truly outdone himself.”

The Straits Course is the crown jewel of the American Club, the only AAA five-diamond resort in the Midwest. But its other three courses – Irish and two at Blackwolf Run – are no slouches either. Each is considered one of America’s 20-best public golf courses and the River Course at Blackwolf Run will host its second U.S. Women’s Open in 2012.

Kohler’s trio rivals Pebble Beach, Spyglass Hill and Spanish Bay. In fact, Bandon Dunes is the only other golfing trio that garners such high praise, but the hotel accommodations there are like college dorms compared with the American Club.

For husband and wife Eric Kay and Gloria MacDonald, the comparison of Whistling Straits to Pebble Beach was something they wanted to judge for themselves. Since marrying in 2004, they’ve been on a mission to experience the best golf courses they can find – including Pebble Beach, which was tops on their list before visiting Kohler.

He, a Toronto attorney, and she, the owner of a Canadian dating website, have the likes of Bandon Dunes, Ireland and Scottsdale on their golf vacationing résumé, but after playing the Straits this spring on a sun-soaked 80-degree afternoon they both admitted Kohler’s three championship golf courses have taken over the top spot.

When asked to compare Pebble Beach with Kohler, their joviality was as evident as the sky was blue that day.

“There’s no comparison,” Gloria beamed from the clubhouse patio that overlooks the ninth and 18th greens at the Straits. “This is 10 times better than Pebble Beach.”

“The Straits Course is in better shape than Pebble and there aren’t any weak holes here,” Eric added.

While they agreed the majestic ocean views of Pebble Beach are unequalled, they were enamored by Pete Dye’s design at the Straits, where mighty Lake Michigan is visible from the tee or green on every hole and an eye-popping 1,200 bunkers litter the rugged landscape. Grassy dunes frame holes like imposing natural walls.

Whistling Straits has the treachery of the Stadium Course at TPC Sawgrass and the raw, natural hazards of Kiawah’s Ocean Course.

When the world’s best golfers got their first glimpse of Whistling Straits at the 2004 PGA Championship, benign conditions the first three days gave way to a brutally windy Sunday. Though Vijay Singh ended up winning in a playoff, his first birdie of the final round didn’t come until the playoff. Chris DiMarco was the only player in the final nine groups to break par that day.

Whistling Straits had lived up to its blustery name and the golf world took notice. The following year Whistling Straits was awarded the 2010 PGA Championship, becoming the first public venue to re-host the championship so quickly. In 2015 it will re-break that record by hosting again, and it will also host the 2020 Ryder Cup.

Three majors and a Ryder Cup before its 22nd birthday? Tiger Woods wasn’t that good, that fast.

But you don’t even have to play the golf course to be inspired by Whistling Straits. Twenty-six-year-old Adam Spenner of Jackson, Wis., is a quadriplegic and breathes with the aid of a ventilator, but that hasn’t stopped him from experiencing all that Whistling Straits has to offer.

At age 3, an astrocytoma brain tumor took away Spenner’s ability to stand and speak, but while he and his family became regular attendees of the U.S. Bank Championship in Milwaukee he developed a love for the sport, despite the fact that he’s unable to hold a golf club.

That doesn’t matter to Spenner. He just loves golf.

At the 2004 PGA Championship, Spenner caught national attention when Phil Mickelson stopped to chat with him during one of his rounds. The poignant mid-round gesture, almost unheard of during an event of such magnitude, created quite a stir among surrounding spectators and put the two in the middle of a mob scene that looked more like Phil and Tiger. Instead, it was Phil and Adam.

Since then Spenner has returned to Whistling Straits on a monthly basis to have lunch with his family. In a thank you letter to Kohler, he wrote about his new-found joy.

“I can’t play golf, but it is my life,” he wrote.

In addition to golf he’s taken up art, and a painting of Whistling Straits (above) that he created using his mouth to hold the paint brush adorns a wall in the clubhouse. If you ask any of the staff about Adam, they’ll tell you he's as much a part of Whistling Straits as the wind off Lake Michigan.

“Adam’s involvement with Whistling Straits makes us proud to be a public-access facility,” said head professional Mike O’Reilly. “If we weren’t open for the public to see and play there are so many things that wouldn’t be included in the Whistling Straits story, including Adam Spenner himself.”

Fifteen years ago when the plumber from Wisconsin envisioned a public course on par with Pebble Beach, it seemed unlikely. But like Adam Spenner wielding a paint brush, some people have the vision to turn a blank canvas into a masterpiece.
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OB tee shot, bunker trouble dooms Rahm to MC

By Ryan LavnerJuly 20, 2018, 7:24 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – The key to surviving Carnoustie is avoiding the bunkers.

Jon Rahm found three bunkers to close out the front nine Friday, the start of a triple bogey-double-bogey run that led to a second-round 78 and missed cut at The Open.

“All of them were as bad a lie as they could have been,” he said. “Besides that, things didn’t happen. I can’t give an explanation, really. I don’t know.”

Rahm’s troubles started on the seventh hole, a par 4 with a steady left-to-right wind. Out of bounds loomed left, and Rahm, who primarily plays a cut shot, hadn’t missed left all week. This time, his ball didn’t curve, and the OB tee shot led to a triple.

“Whenever I start missing shots to the left,” he said, “it’s really hard for me to play.”  

After a career-best fourth-place finish at the Masters, Rahm has now missed the cut in consecutive majors.

“Right now I’m not in any mental state to think about what happened, to be honest,” he said.

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Three of world's top 5 MC; not 60-year-old Langer

By Mercer BaggsJuly 20, 2018, 7:04 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Three of the top five players in the world missed the cut at The Open.

Bernhard Langer did not.

The 60-year-old, who is in the field via his victory in last year’s Senior Open Championship, shot even-par 71 on Friday. At 2 over through 36 holes, he safely made it under the plus-3 cut line.

"You know, I've played the Masters [this year], made the cut. I'm here and made the cut. I think it is an accomplishment," he said. "There's a lot of great players in the field, and I've beaten a lot of very good players that are a lot younger than me."

Langer had three birdies and three bogeys in the second round and said afterwards that he was “fighting myself” with his swing. He’s spent the last few days on the phone with his swing coach, Willy Hoffman, trying to find some comfort.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


Despite his score, and his made cut, Langer the perfectionist wasn’t satisfied with the way he went about achieving his results.

"I wasn't happy with my ball-striking. My putting was good, but I was unlucky. I had like four lip-outs, no lip-ins. That part was good. But the ball-striking, I wasn't really comfortable with my swing," he said. "Just, it's always tough trying stuff in the middle of a round."

Langer, a two-time Masters champion, has never won The Open. He does, however, have six top-3 finishes in 30 prior starts.

As for finishing higher than some of the top-ranked players in the world, the World Golf Hall of Famer is taking it in stride.

"I'm not going to look and say, 'Oh, I beat Justin Rose or beat whatever.' But it just shows it's not easy. When some of the top 10 or top 20 in the world don't make the cut, it just shows that the setup is not easy," Langer said. "So I got the better half of the draw maybe, too, right? It wasn't much fun playing in the rain, I guess, this morning for five hours. I had to practice in the rain, but I think once I teed off, we never used umbrellas. So that was a blessing."

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Kisner doubles 18, defends not laying up

By Rex HoggardJuly 20, 2018, 6:42 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – It was only fitting that Jean Van de Velde was there working as an on-course reporter on Friday as Kevin Kisner struggled his way up Carnoustie’s 18th fairway.

Rolling along with a two-stroke lead, Kisner’s 8-iron approach shot from an awkward lie in the rough from 160 yards squirted right and bounced into Barry Burn, the winding creek where Van de Velde’s title chances at the 1999 Open Championship began to erode.

Unlike Van de Velde, who made a triple bogey-7 and lost The Open in a playoff, Kisner’s double bogey only cost him the solo lead and he still has 36 holes to make his closing miscue a distant memory. That’s probably why the 34-year-old seemed at ease with his plight.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


“It just came out like a high flop shot to the right. It was weird. I don't know if it caught something or what happened,” said Kisner, who was tied with Zach Johnson and Zander Lombard at 6 under par. “You never know out of that grass. It was in a different grass than usual. It was wet, green grass instead of the brown grass. So I hadn't really played from that too much.”

Like most in this week’s field Kisner also understands that rounds on what is widely considered the most difficult major championship venue can quickly unravel even with the most innocent of mistakes.

“To play 35 holes without a double I thought was pretty good,” he said. “I've kept the ball in play, done everything I wanted to do all the way up into that hole. Just one of those things that came out completely different than we expected. I'll live with that more than chipping out and laying up from 20 feet.”

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Wind, not rain more a weekend factor at Open

By Mercer BaggsJuly 20, 2018, 6:39 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – After a half-day of rain in Round 2 of the 147th Open Championship, the weekend offers a much drier forecast.

Saturday at Carnoustie is projected to be mostly cloudy with a high of 62 degrees and only a 20 percent chance of rain.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


Sunday calls for much warmer conditions, with temperatures rising upwards of 73 degrees under mostly cloudy skies.

Wind might be the only element the players have to factor in over the final 36 holes. While the winds will be relatively calm on Saturday, expected around 10-15 mph, they could increase to 25 mph in the final round.