Jon Rahm and Kelley Cahill at the 2017 DP World Tour Championship. Getty Images

Rahm details recent engagement to Cahill

By Nick MentaAugust 9, 2018, 11:46 pm

ST. LOUIS – Jon Rahm spent less time Thursday night discussing his opening-round 68 at the PGA Championship than he did his recent engagement to his longtime girlfriend Kelley Cahill.

Rahm said he proposed prior to this year's U.S. Open. And apparently, he saves all his sweating for the golf course.

"If there's ever a doubt that she's going to say no, I understand the nervousness," he said. "But in my case, I was 100 percent sure she was going to say yes."

Rahm designed the ring himself with help from Brian Stuard's wife, who is a jeweler, after the both of them got some input from Cahill on what she wanted.

"She wanted to pick the diamond, but I knew what I wanted," he continued. "I designed what's around the ring. It's supposed to look like a crown and an engraving inside. I had a big part in it. It wasn't exactly what she wanted, but she loves it. It's a little more personal like that."

Rahm says they have no current timeline for setting a date, and that they're opting not to think about it until at least the end of the year. The couple will have to figure out a time and place to get families from two different continents together, so for now they're just trying to "enjoy the process."


Gallery: Best of Jon Rahm and Kelley Cahill


Rahm and Cahill first started dating while at Arizona State. They've been together long enough that being engaged has changed very little.

"For our relationship, we started dating in college. We moved in after six months, and we've been living together for two years already," he said. "I think we acted and both felt like a married couple already. We felt like being official in that sense, so it really hasn't changed much in that sense."

On Wednesday, Rahm sent out a Tweet stating that he and Cahill will be donating to the GoFundMe account set up for the family of Jarrod Lyle.

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DeChambeau gets foursomes, fourball mixed up

By Will GraySeptember 25, 2018, 3:31 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – Bryson DeChambeau is an accomplished player when it comes to match play, having captured the U.S. Amateur and starred on a Walker Cup team. But don’t ask him to explain the semantic difference between the formats in play at this week’s Ryder Cup.

DeChambeau became crossed up Tuesday at Le Golf National when he was asked about the intricacies of foursomes play – better known to many Americans as alternate shot.

“Fourball, foursomes, I always get those mixed up,” DeChambeau said. “It’s just easier for me to say alternate shot.”


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Thankfully for DeChambeau, he still has some time to make a distinction between the two before the matches begin in earnest. And when they do, it’ll be fourballs for the morning sessions both Friday and Saturday, with foursomes in the afternoon – a change from the 2016 matches when DeChambeau was on the grounds at Hazeltine as a spectator.

While the foursomes format brings with it added pressure in an already tense environment, one of the biggest concerns is how well players can adjust to using the ball of their partner on a given hole. DeChambeau is known to leave nothing to chance in his preparation, and he’s already circled that particular factor as he gets set to make his Ryder Cup debut.

“It’s key because we want to be comfortable. Each player needs to be comfortable with the ball that they are playing,” DeChambeau said. “So for compatibility reasons, it’s one of the most important things out there in regards to alternate shot. It is the most important.”

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Tiger helped calm down Reed before epic RC match

By Ryan LavnerSeptember 25, 2018, 3:30 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – Tiger Woods apparently played a pivotal role in getting Patrick Reed ready for that epic Ryder Cup singles match against Rory McIlroy – all by cracking a joke on the range.

Then a U.S. vice captain, Woods noticed that Reed was too amped up during the warm-up for the opening singles match.

“He’s watching me warm up, and he’s like, He needs to calm down. He needs to chill out,” Reed recalled. “I was hitting the ball sideways – I was just like, Let’s go.


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“But he pulled me aside. Cracked a little joke to calm me down a little bit” – what the joke was, Reed wouldn’t say, but you can probably guess that it was unprintable – “and I was able to bring that adrenaline level down to manageable, rather than sitting there on high rev.”

It didn’t take long for Reed to explode again.

In one of the most entertaining matches in Ryder Cup history, Reed and McIlroy traded blows for the first eight holes at Hazeltine, combining for eight birdies and an eagle before settling down. Reed eventually won the match, 1 up, after rolling in a birdie putt on the final green.

“It’s something that was hard to make sure you stayed up in that mind frame and also that level that you could play,” Reed said. “You get so amped up, it’s hard. It’s hard to figure out how far you’re going to hit the ball, but at the same time, if you’re so even-keeled in the other direction, it’s hard to get yourself up to get going. You only have 18 holes.

“The good thing is I’ve been able to manage that really well, and luckily I was able to have Tiger there to help me out there on Sunday.”

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Improved putting a focus for slumping Mickelson

By Ryan LavnerSeptember 25, 2018, 3:12 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – For the U.S. side, one of the biggest question marks heading into this week is the state of Phil Mickelson’s game.

Mickelson was all out of sorts last week at the Tour Championship, where he finished last in the 30-man field, shooting 13 over par and finishing 24 strokes behind Tiger Woods.

Part of that poor play likely can be attributed to Mickelson looking ahead to this week, where the Americans will try to snap a 25-year winless drought on foreign soil. But Mickelson conceded Tuesday that his game still needs plenty of work before the Ryder Cup begins on Friday.

“I’m going to spend more time with the putter,” Mickelson said. “It’s Tuesday. We have two more practice rounds.”


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Mickelson’s putting has been one of the strongest parts of his game this season – he was ranked 10th in strokes gained: putting – but he had two of his worst weeks of the year on the greens at the BMW Championship and Tour Championship. In each of those starts, he ranked nearly the bottom of the field in putting and lost an average of 1.3 strokes to the field each round. (His worst putting tournament of the year was the PGA Championship, where he lost an average of -1.6 strokes a round.)

But there were larger concerns. Of the 30 players in the field at East Lake, he was better than only two in the strokes gained: tee to green category.  

Overall, Mickelson doesn't have a top-10 on Tour since early May. 

“I don’t want to put too much time into it,” he said. “I’m not trying to get fine-tuned. I’m just trying to get posture, alignment, basic fundamentals matched up for the swing, so I have a little bit of work to do. I didn’t strike it the way I wanted to, but the last two weeks were the worst putting weeks of the year, and hopefully I can turn that around.”

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Woods will take time to savor success after Ryder Cup

By Will GraySeptember 25, 2018, 3:04 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – In the time since the last putt dropped at East Lake, Tiger Woods has been in the midst of an intercontinental whirlwind as he prepares for his Ryder Cup return. What he hasn’t had time for is savoring his drought-breaking victory.

Woods won the Tour Championship on Sunday for his first title in more than five years, a performance that drew congratulations and support from throughout the golf world and beyond. After his first practice round at Le Golf National, Woods admitted that his phone still hasn’t stopped buzzing.


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“I’m trying to return the text messages I’ve gotten, but I’m still well north of 150,” Woods said. “So it’s going to take me a little bit of time before I answer all that.”

Woods hasn’t had a chance to digest his triumph in Atlanta, having been whisked from his post-victory media requirements straight to the U.S. team charter to France. He explained that the only video highlights he’s seen from East Lake are the ones that have aired on a French news station in his hotel, giving him a quick glance of the throng of thousands that followed him up the final fairway.

While there’s work to be done this week as he looks to help the U.S. win in Europe for the first time in 25 years, he knows that a chance to exhale following a comeback season that exceeded even his own expectations is close on the horizon.

“I haven’t really had a lot of time to soak it in,” Woods said. “Post-Ryder Cup, it will be a different story. I’ll look back and soak it up, and really reflect on what really transpired that entire week.”