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Rosaforte Report: Phil 'very optimistic' about 2018

By Tim RosaforteJanuary 15, 2018, 5:05 pm

This is the time of year when Phil Mickelson turns up for practice rounds with Freddie Couples at The Madison Club in La Quinta, plays Riviera Country Club (as he did on Saturday), and talks about “making it a great year.” The freshness of another West Coast swing awaits, with Mickelson going into this opening stretch of his 27th season knowing 13 of his 42 PGA Tour victories have come in his home state of California.

Last year was different, because Mickelson was coming off two sports hernia surgeries. At 47, he enters the season healthy and with hopes of making the U.S. Ryder Cup team.

“I really would like to be on that team,” Mickelson told me Sunday morning in the closing stages of preparation for his season debut this week in the CareerBuilder Challenge. “I’m putting forth a lot of effort to get ready, so I play my best to get on a team.”

Mickelson has not missed a Ryder Cup since 1995. If he makes Jim Furyk’s squad and plays in France, it would be his 11th straight Ryder Cup appearance. Performance wise, he needs to step it up. Ranked 40th in the world, he is coming off a season with five top-10s, missed cuts in the PGA and Open Championship and a T-22 in the Masters. He skipped the U.S. Open for daughter Amanda’s high-school graduation.

This year’s U.S. Open holds a special place on Mickelson’s playing schedule. His last of 42 victories was The Open in 2013, so there is plenty of motivation to complete the career Grand Slam at Shinnecock, where he finished fourth in 1995 and second in 2004.

“I’ve put in a lot of time in [the] off-season, getting ready [for] this year,” he said from his base camp in Palm Springs. “I’m physically a lot stronger. I’ve been practicing and working to get my game sharp. I don’t know how it’s going to start out, but I’m very optimistic.”



Little bro steps into the light: Chase Koepka doesn’t look at it like playing in his brother’s shadow. Instead, it’s like playing for one of his biggest fans.

So when he tied for seventh place in his debut as a full-time member of the European Tour, the best text message Koepka got coming off the 18th green at the South African Open was from brother Brooks, the U.S. Open champion. “He believes in me so much,” Chase said not long after his closing birdie. “He’s pumped.”

What made it even more impressive is that it was Koepka’s first tournament with new equipment on a course (Glendower GC) in the mountains that he had never played before. Just before flying to South Africa, he signed with Callaway to use their clubs and ball. An injury prevented him from practicing enough to get the feel of his new tools.

“I couldn’t be happier,” he said of the adjustment phase. “This is a course you had to see multiple times to understand how to play it. To see it for the first time showed how good my game is.”

A top-5 finish would have exempted Koepka into this week’s Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, but he will spend the week practicing with two teammates from his University of South Florida golf team in Dubai, where he will play next week. It will allow him to get better adjusted. “I’m going to relax and get some work done,” Chase said. “It was a good first week. I’ll have plenty more chances to win on the European Tour.”



In from the cold: Dan McCarthy’s pathway to the Web.com Tour started at LeMoyne College, a Division II private Jesuit school in his hometown of Syracuse, N.Y. But he wouldn’t be where he is today, starting the third round of the Bahamas Great Exuma Classic with a one-shot lead, without connections to Bear Lakes CC in West Palm Beach, Fla., and the hitting bay of Dennis Tiziani in Madison, Wis.

At Bear Lakes, he joins a cast of tour players that goes back to the heydays of Mark Calcavecchia, Ken Green, Kevin Johnson, Steve Hart, Brett and Dana Quigley, along with more modern players like the Koepka brothers, Brooks and Chase. He is known to play in members’ games and joined a list of tour players that have won the clubs pro-scratch event, making 11 birdies in his last 12 holes.

“I’ve never done anything like that before or since,” McCarthy told me Monday morning from the Bahamas. “It’s amazing what you can do when you get out of your own way.”

At 32, McCarthy is hoping to take that mindset when bogey is a good score in the final 36 holes at the windswept Sandals Emerald Bay. Playing on a medical exemption, McCarthy’s big-picture goal is locking up his Web.com card in a reshuffle after the first four events. He won four times in 11 events on the MacKenzie Tour in 2016 before suffering a wrist injury after finishing T-4 in Exuma to open the 2017 season.

Tiziani stepped into the picture when McCarthy missed second stage of Web.com Q-School by a shot in 2013. Always admiring Stricker’s swing and demeanor, McCarthy had his mother go online to track down Tiziani’s whereabouts and he made the visit to Wisconsin.

“They’ve got a nice little bubble up there, and they’ve been very kind to me, welcoming me into that circle,’’ McCarthy said. “They taught me tremendous amount and turned my game around.”

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Garcia leads as Valderrama Masters extends to Monday

By Will GrayOctober 21, 2021, 3:52 pm

Weather continues to be the enemy at the Andalucia Valderrama Masters, where Sergio Garcia remains in front as the tournament heads for a Monday finish.

European Tour officials had already ceded the fact that 72 holes would not be completed this week in Spain, but players were not even able to finish 54 holes before another set of thunderstorms rolled in Sunday afternoon to once again halt play. Garcia remains in front at 10 under, having played seven holes of the third round in even par, while Lee Westwood is alone in second at 7 under.

Officials had previously stated an intention to play at least 54 holes, even if that meant extending the tournament to Monday, given that this is the final chance for many players to earn Race to Dubai points in an effort to secure European Tour cards for 2019. Next week's WGC-HSBC Champions will be the final event of the regular season, followed by a three-event final series.


Full-field scores from the Andalucia Valderrama Masters


Garcia, who won the tournament last year, started the third round with a four-shot lead over Ashley Chesters. He balanced one birdie with one bogey and remains in position for his first worldwide victory since the Asian Tour's Singapore Open in January.

Westwood, who has his son Sam on the bag this week, made the biggest charge up the leaderboard with four birdies over his first eight holes. He'll have 10 holes to go when play resumes at 9:10 a.m. local time Monday as he looks to win for the first time since the 2015 Indonesian Masters.

Shane Lowry and Gonzalo Fernandez-Castano are tied for third at 6 under, four shots behind Garcia with 10 holes to play, while Chesters made two double bogeys over his first four holes to drop into a tie for sixth.

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In Buick win, Kang overcame demons of mind and spirit

By Randall MellOctober 21, 2018, 3:33 pm

Danielle Kang beat three of the most formidable foes in golf Sunday to win the Buick LPGA Shanghai.

Anxiety.

Frustration.

Anger.

Kang overcame these demons of mind and spirit to win for the second time on tour, backing up her KPMG Women’s PGA Championship victory last year.

“I’ve been going through a lot mentally,” Kang said.

Kang birdied four of the last eight holes to close with a 3-under-par 69, coming from one shot back in the final round to win. At 13-under 275, she finished two shots ahead of a pack of seven players, including world No. 2 Ariya Jutanugarn (71) and former world No. 1 Lydia Ko (66).

It hasn’t been easy for Kang trying to build on her major championship breakthrough last year. She started the fall Asian swing having missed three cuts in a row, five in her last six starts.

“I had to go through swing changes,” Kang said. “I had the swing yips, the putting yips, everything possibly you could think of.

“I was able to get over a lot of anxiety I was feeling when I was trying to hit a golf ball. This week I just kept trusting my golf game.”

Through her swoon, Kang said she was struggling to get the club back, that she was getting mentally stuck to where she could not begin her takeaway. She sought out Butch Harmon, back at her Las Vegas home, for help. She said tying for third at the KEB Hana Bank Championship last week felt like a victory, though she was still battling her demons there.

“Anxiety over tee balls,” Kang said. “People might wonder what I'm doing. I actually can't pull the trigger. It has nothing to do with the result. Having to get over that last week was incredible for me. Even on the first round, one shot took me, I think, four minutes.”

Kang, who turned 26 on Saturday, broke through to win last year under swing coach David Leadbetter, but she began working with Harmon while struggling in the second half this year.


Buick LPGA Shanghai: Articles, photos and videos


“I was actually very frustrated, even yesterday,” Kang said. “Things just weren't going my way. The biggest thing that Butch tells me is to stay out of my own way. I just couldn't do that. If I had a short putt, I just kept doubting myself. I couldn't putt freely.”

Kang said her anger and frustration built up again on the front nine Sunday. She made the turn at 1 over for the round. She said her caddie, Oliver Brett, helped her exorcise some anger. After the ninth hole, he pulled her aside.

This is how Kang remembered the conversation:

Brett: “Whatever you need to do to let your anger out and restart and refresh, you need to do that now.”

Kang: “Cameras are everywhere. I just want to hit the bag really hard.”

Brett: “Here's a wedge. Just smash it.”

Kang did.

“Honestly, I thank him for that,” Kang said. “He told me there are a lot birdies out there. I regrouped, and we pretended we started the round brand new on the 10th hole. Then things changed and momentum started going my way. I started hitting it closer and felt better over the putts.”

Kang said the victory was all about finding a better place mentally.

“I'm just so happy to be where I'm at today,” Kang said. “I'm just happy that I won.

“More so than anything, I'm finally at a place where I'm peaceful and happy with my game, with my life . . . . I hope I win more. I did the best I can. I'm going to keep working hard and keep giving myself chances and keep putting myself in contention. I'll win more. I'll play better.”

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Goal for new world No. 1 Koepka: Stay healthy

By Will GrayOctober 21, 2018, 1:38 pm

Last season Brooks Koepka bagged a pair of majors en route to the PGA Tour's Player of the Year award. He started the new wraparound season with an emphatic win at the CJ Cup to reach world No. 1 for the first time.

But amid the best form of his career, Koepka has a simple goal in mind as he gets ready to turn his attention to the new year.

"Stay healthy," Koepka told reporters. "That's been the big thing. I need to be healthy to be able to play all these events, play all the majors."

Koepka's breakthrough year comes despite the fact that he missed four months in the spring, including the Masters, while recovering from a wrist injury. He hit the ground running once he returned, with strong finishes at TPC Sawgrass and Colonial preceding wins at the U.S. Open and PGA Championship.

Now Koepka has added a third trophy after cruising to a four-shot win in South Korea on Sunday that allowed him to move past Dustin Johnson at world No. 1.

"I'm 1-for-1 this year, which is nice," Koepka joked about his undefeated record in the new wraparound season.

Koepka will be in the field next week in China for the WGC-HSBC Champions before putting the clubs on the shelf. With Justin Thomas paving the way by making the goal-setting process more public in recent years, Koepka explained that even after summiting the world rankings he plans to wait until 2019 to adjust his expectations for himself.

"I keep the same goals through the calendar year," Koepka said. "On Jan. 1 I go to the beach in the morning and go write down my goals and figure them out for the calendar year, but I just need to finish this year off. I've got next week and I would like to, coming out the first week as No. 1, I'd like to play well."

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Birdie binge for Woodland comes up short at CJ Cup

By Will GrayOctober 21, 2018, 12:52 pm

Gary Woodland mounted an impressive rally at the CJ Cup, but in the end even 11 birdies weren't enough to catch Brooks Koepka.

Woodland started the final round in South Korea five shots behind the new world No. 1, but he made the biggest move of the day amid chilly conditions on Jeju Island. With six birdies over his first nine holes, including four in a row on Nos. 6-9, he briefly caught Koepka at the top of the leaderboard.

But Woodland bogeyed No. 10, and even with five more birdies coming home to finish a 9-under 63 he still finished alone in second, four shots behind Koepka who closed with a bogey-free 29 to put the trophy out of reach.

"Yesterday I didn't get any putts to go in, and today I saw a lot of putts go in," Woodland told reporters. "Brooks with the lead, not much fazes him. So you knew you had to make a lot of birdies, and I made a lot today. But I was just too far behind."

It's the second straight strong performance from Woodland to start the new wraparound season, as he tied for fifth at the CIMB Classic in Malaysia after holding a share of the 54-hole lead. A closing 63 would have gone a long way last week, but he was still pleased to be able to make Koepka sweat a little on a day when even the bad holes resulted from good shots.

"I made two bogeys on the back and I said, 'Be right' on both shots," Woodland said. "I was just maybe a little too amped up, a little excited. I hit them both perfect. All in all, I would have liked for a couple more putts to go in yesterday and been a little closer going into today."