Golf Talk Live - Johnny Bulla Transcript Segment 2

By Golf Channel DigitalFebruary 12, 2001, 5:00 pm
PETER KESSLER
 
WHAT DO YOU RECALL FONDLY OR OTHERWISE ABOUT HAVING TO DEAL WITH STYMIES?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
I HATED THEM.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
(LAUGHS)
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
I COULDN'T CHIP, I COULDN'T CHIP THE BALL OVER IT ANYWAY. I GOT TO TELL YOU A STORY. I WAS PLAYING IN THE PGA AT RICHMOND, VIRGINIA AND, I WAS PLAYING JIM TENESA , AND I'M ONE UP
 
COMING TO THE 17TH HOLE, AND I HAD A FOUR FOOT PUTT FOR A THREE AND HE WAS ALREADY FOUR AND HE LET, AS HE CHIPPED HE LAID ME A STYMIE AND I THOUGHT WELL I CAN'T CHIP OVER THE BALL, I'LL JUST HIT IT HARD AND KNOCK IT, MY BALL WILL STOP AND KNOCK IT OUT OF THE WAY AND I'LL WIN THE HOLE,
 
SO I HIT IT HARD AND KNOCKED HIS BALL RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE HOLE, MISSED MY PUTT... AND I'M SO UPSET I THREE PUTT 18. INSTEAD OF GOING AND BEATING HIM TWO AND ONE, I LOST ONE DOWN.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
SO YOU WERE NOT UNHAPPY LATER WHEN THEY OUTLAWED THE STYMIE.
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
OH I GOT THE WORST, I GOT, I THINK I GOT THE RECORD. I PLAYED 36 HOLES WITH, IN THE PGA IN, IN PITTSBURGH AND I HAD SEVEN STYMIES LAID ME AND THERE'S NO, IT'S JUST LUCK, BECAUSE IF YOU'RE THAT GOOD YOU COULD PUT THE BALL IN THE HOLE.... IT WASN'T FAIR.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
WHO DID ALL OF YOU GO TO, AND WE'RE WATCHING JONES OF COURSE NEGOTIATING SUCCESSFULLY STYMIES ON THE PRACTICE GREEN AND IN HIS FILMS HE DID FOR WARNER BROTHERS, HOW I PLAY GOLF. WHO DID, HE WENT OF COURSE TO STUART MADEN, HIS TEACHER, WHEN HE HAD A PROBLEM WITH HIS SWING BUT, WHO
 
DID THE REST OF YOU GO TO, WHO DID THE PROFESSIONALS ON TOUR GO TO WHEN YOU NEEDED THAT KIND OF HELP?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
LET ME TELL YOU SOMETHING, I NEVER HAD ONE PRO TO HELP ME THE ENTIRE TIME I WAS OUT THERE ON THE TOUR. SAM MADE A REMARK LATER ON AND HE WAS RIGHT. HE SAID I'D NEVER HELP ANYBODY THAT I THOUGHT WOULD BEAT
 
ME, BUT HE WASN'T, HE WASN'T SHY TO ASK ME WHAT HE WAS DOING WRONG BECAUSE I KNEW HIS SWING.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
WOULD YOU TELL HIM?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
OH SURE I WOULD, BUT I, I CAN'T EVER REMEMBER ANYBODY EVER HELPING ME WITH MY SWING.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
NOW YOU KNOW, BYRON NELSON ONCE SAID THAT HE THOUGHT THAT YOU EXPERIMENTED TOO MUCH WITH YOUR GOLF SWING. IS THAT A FAIR REMARK ON HIS PART?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
NO, THAT'S NOT A FAIR REMARK. THAT WAS, THE REASON I EXPERIMENTED, THAT WAS AFTER I STARTED HITTING SOME BALLS LEFT HANDED, I WAS ALL THROUGH PLAYING TOURNAMENT GOLF BY THAT TIME ANYWAY.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
DO YOU THINK PEOPLE APPRECIATE ABOUT NELSON'S GREAT YEAR OF 1945 WHEN HE WON ELEVEN IN A ROW AND 18 OF THE 30 TOUR EVENTS THAT HE PLAYED IN THAT, UNLIKE TODAY WHERE A LOT OF THE COURSES HAVE BEEN SHORTENED BY THE GREATNESS OF THE PLAYERS AND THE ADVANCES IN TECHNOLOGY WHERE A LOT OF THE HOLES ARE DRIVES AND PITCHES,
 
NELSON IN THOSE DAYS STILL HAD TO HIT DRIVES AND FIVE IRONS AND BRASSIES AND SPOONS AND, AND LONG SHOTS AS WELL AS PITCHES INTO THE PAR 4'S DIDN'T HE?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
WELL, WHY ABSOLUTELY, BUT YOU SEE, THAT HAD A LOT TO DO WITH THE EQUIPMENT AND THE AGRONOMY. YOU JUST COULDN'T HIT THE BALL AS FAR WITH EQUIPMENT THAT WE PLAYED WITH. I THINK BYRON NELSON'S RECORD IS FANTASTIC, EVEN THOUGH HE DID IT DURING THE WAR, HE DIDN'T HAVE THE COMPETITION. LOOK AT HIS SCORES. HE PLAYED ON SOME GOLF COURSES DURING THE WAR THAT THE AVERAGE PLAYER, THE AVERAGE PRO WOULDN'T EVEN GO
 
OUT ON THE COURSE BECAUSE THEY DIDN'T HAVE THE EQUIPMENT AND THEY DIDN'T HAVE THE MAN POWER TO MAINTAIN THEM. THE GOLF COURSES WERE TERRIBLE DURING THE WAR, AND HE SHOT SOME OF THE BEST SCORES THAT WERE SHOT DURING THAT TIME.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
AND OF COURSE YOU MENTIONED A SCORING AVERAGE THAT WAS 68.33 FOR THAT YEAR, AND THAT WASN'T BROKEN OF COURSE UNTIL 2000 WHEN TIGER WAS THE FIRST GUY TO GO AHEAD AND DO THAT.
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
ABSOLUTELY RIGHT. ABSOLUTELY RIGHT.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
NOW YOUR BUDDY SAM SNEAD SAID THAT THE THREE BEST PLAYERS THAT EVER LIVED WERE HIM, NICKLAUS SECOND, AND HOGAN THIRD. WHAT DO YOU THINK THAT, WHO DO YOU THINK THE THREE BEST PLAYERS OF ALL TIME WERE?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
OH I THINK JONES GOES AHEAD OF HOGAN. HOGAN HAD A PERIOD. I MEAN HE PLAYED SOME GREAT GOLF. DON'T GET ME WRONG, I THINK HE WAS A GREAT PLAYER, BUT HE, HE, HE DIDN'T COME CLOSE TO JONES. YOU GET, IT'S HARD TO COMPARE
 
THEM AT THE DIFFERENT TIMES, BUT AS FAR AS I'M CONCERNED, JONES WAS A FAR BETTER PLAYER THAN HOGAN OVER THE PERIOD OF TIME THAT HE PLAYED.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
HOW DID JONES PLAY ON THAT DAY DURING WORLD WAR TWO WHEN YOU HAD A VAPOR LOCK IN YOUR PLANE THAT YOU WERE FLYING HIM IN AND IT WAS TOUCH AND GO UNTIL YOU GOT IT SORTED OUT NOT TOO LONG BEFORE YOU FINALLY LANDED, WAS HE ABLE TO BREAK 90?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
I THINK HE SHOT ABOUT 85. HE WAS, POOR GUY, HE WAS JUST, HE WAS SCARED TO DEATH, AND I DON'T BLAME HIM. HE DIDN'T KNOW ABOUT FLYING.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
TELL ME MORE ABOUT THAT.
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
WELL, WE WENT DOWN TO PLAY IN AN EXHIBITION IN MONTGOMERIE, AND I HAD BORROWED A LITTLE EP, FOUR PLACE AIRPLANE, THAT HADN'T BEEN FLOWN FOR ABOUT SIX MONTHS AND BOB HAD, WE HAD OUR CLUBS IN THE BACK AND BOB'S
 
SITTING OVER THE SIDE OF ME ON THE RIGHT HAND SIDE AND IF I HAD HAVE REACHED UP AND CUT THE SWITCH I COULDN'T HAVE STOPPED THE ENGINE QUICK OR IT COULD JUST, BOOM, AND OF COURSE NOW BOB IS, HE'S ABOUT TO JUMP
 
OUT OF THE AIRPLANE, SO I PUT MY ARM AROUND HIM AND I SAID BOB I CAN LAND THE AIRPLANE. WHAT HAPPENED WAS, WE GOT A VAPOR LOCK IN THE LINES AND I SAID THE ONLY WAY WE GOT A CHANCE TO BREAK IT LOOSE IS STICK THE NOSE
 
STRAIGHT DOWN. CAN YOU IMAGINE, HE, HE DOESN'T FLY AND HE'S SITTING THERE LOOKING STRAIGHT DOWN. I'VE GOT THE PLANE STRAIGHT DOWN, I'M TRYING TO HOLD HIM, KEEP HIM COMFORTABLE. I WASN'T ANY SCAREDER THAN I AM
 
SITTING RIGHT HERE BECAUSE I KNOW I CAN LAND THE AIRPLANE AND AT ABOUT 15 HUNDRED FEET IT BROKE LOOSE AND WE FLEW ON DOWN THERE, BUT HE WAS A SCARED PERSON.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
DID HE DRINK AND SMOKE A LITTLE MORE THAN USUAL THAT NIGHT?
 
JOHNNY BULLA
 
I DON'T KNOW. (LAUGHS) I DON'T KNOW, BUT I KNOW ONE THING, HE WOULDN'T COME BACK IN THAT AIRPLANE. THEY GOT ANOTHER AIRPLANE TO BRING HIM HOME IN.
 
PETER KESSLER
 
WELL YOU CAN'T BLAME HIM. WE'LL BE RIGHT BACK.
 
(MUSIC)
 
NEXT SEGMENT
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Football coach hates golf: Don't need practice swearing

By Jason CrookApril 20, 2018, 10:15 pm

Some football coaches are a little more talkative than others. On one side of the spectrum, there's Bill Belichick. On the other sits Washington State football coach Mike Leach.

Leach always delivers the goods, and when asked recently if he liked golf, he didn't hold back:

As wrong as the 57-year-old is on the topic (golf is awesome), the man makes some hilarious points:

• “It’s boring. I don’t care where that ball goes.”

• "Golfers are always practicing their swing. But you know what I never did? I never practice fishing in my living room.”

• "They'll line up over the ball and they'll say they're going to do something that you can't do with a sniper rifle and a scope, but they're going to do it with a stick and a ball."

• “Golf’s pretty much for people that don’t swear effectively enough or need practice. And so there are people that need golf, and I don’t think I do.”

So in conclusion, it's confirmed: Mike Leach - not a golf guy.

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Quiros takes 1-shot lead in Morocco

By Associated PressApril 20, 2018, 8:22 pm

RABAT, Morocco - Alvaro Quiros shot a solid 2-under 70 in windy conditions to push into a one-shot lead after two rounds of the Trophee Hassan II in Morocco on Friday.

Quiros fought the elements, carding seven birdies and five bogeys to move to 7 under overall and take the outright lead at the halfway point of the European Tour event.

The Spaniard was one clear of Andrew Dodt, who moved into contention with a 4-under 68 at the Royal Golf Dar Es Salam course. Dodt dropped two shots in his first six holes but the Australian recovered from that shaky start to collect four birdies and an eagle.


Full-field scores from the Trophee Hassan II


Erik van Rooyen of South Africa was another shot back in third on 5 under after his 71.

Bradley Dredge of Wales, who shared the first-round lead with Quiros, slipped off the pace with a 1-over 73. He's tied for fourth with Austin Connelly of Canada (71), 4 under par and three shots behind Quiros.

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Bogey-free Moore shares Valero lead

By Will GrayApril 20, 2018, 8:20 pm

Amid the swirling winds on a difficult track at the Valero Texas Open, Ryan Moore has yet to blink.

Moore was one of only two players among the 156-man field to go bogey-free during the opening round at TPC San Antonio, and he's now the only player still boasting a clean scorecard after a second-round 67 that included five birdies and the rest pars. At 9 under, the veteran shares the lead with Zach Johnson and was three shots clear of any other player at the end of the morning wave.

"Really, around this golf course what matters is the right distance," Moore told reporters. "You can get in some pretty tough spots if you're long and short. So I kind of hit it the right distance all day, gave myself plenty of good birdie opportunities and didn't stress myself out too much with too many up-and-downs."

While many players struggle to find a true offseason, Moore took nearly three months off between starts at the OHL Classic at Mayakoba and Waste Management Phoenix Open. During that time he shed nearly 20 pounds thanks to changes to his diet and teamed up with a new swing coach, Drew Steckel, in December.

The results have been solid if not spectacular, as Moore tied for fifth at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and finished T-16 last week at the RBC Heritage.

"It's been solid golf, especially the last few weeks. I haven't got a ton out of it," Moore said. "The putter just wasn't there. So this week, just got a little more comfortable with the putter and knocked a few putts in that kind of matter early in my rounds, and it's going in. That's kind of what's been missing lately."

Moore had a breakthrough season in 2016 that included his victory at the John Deere Classic and spot on the Ryder Cup team, but he hasn't sniffed career win No. 6 since a T-3 finish at the Sentry Tournament of Champions 16 months ago. Should he keep a clean card this weekend in San Antonio, his chances to end that victory drought appear bright.

"I played some really nice golf yesterday, I just controlled the ball nicely all the way around and was bogey-free yesterday, so thought, 'Let's go try and do that again,'" Moore said. "So to play in tough, windy conditions, to go bogey-free (again), it was some good solid golf."

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Former champ Z. Johnson surges at Valero

By Will GrayApril 20, 2018, 7:31 pm

Midway through his opening round at the Valero Texas Open, Zach Johnson appeared far closer to a missed cut than a spot on the leaderboard.

Johnson initially struggled in the winds at TPC San Antonio, playing his first 13 holes in 3 over. But he eagled No. 14 and closed with three more birdies to post a 2-under 70, then went unconscious during a second-round 65 where he made six birdies over his first 10 holes.

It added up to a 9-under total at the halfway point, and instead of packing his bags the two-time major champ now shares the lead with Ryan Moore.

"You just never know. That's the beauty of this game," Johnson told reporters. "I didn't have anything going putting-wise. I felt like I was hitting some solid shots and wasn't getting rewarded, and you've just got to stay in it. You've got to persevere, grind it out, fight for pars. Shoot, I made some good pars all while being 3 over. You just never know."

Johnson won this event in both 2008 and 2009, but that was when it was held across town at La Cantera Golf Club. Since the switch to TPC San Antonio in 2010, he has only one top-10 finish and two missed cuts, including last year's early exit with consecutive rounds of 74.

But Friday he played like a man unaware of the venue shift, with four straight birdies on Nos. 12-15 and a hole-out eagle from the greenside bunker on the par-4 fifth hole. His closing bogey on No. 9 was his first dropped shot in the last 25 holes.

"The confidence is there, and when you can step on the tee with this kind of wind, you trust your clubs and trust your ball, that's pretty important," Johnson said. "I felt good. It was hard, I'm not going to deny that. That was one of the better 27-hole stretches that I've had in a long time."

Johnson's 65 was his first sub-70 score since an opening-round 69 at the Arnold Palmer Invitational, a span of 12 stroke-play rounds. The veteran has made every cut in 11 starts this season, but his T-8 finish at the RSM Classic in November remains his only top-10 finish.

"I felt really good coming into the week," Johnson said. "Confidence was there, it just wasn't showing up on the scorecard."