Callaway Dead at Age 82

By Golf Channel NewsroomJuly 5, 2001, 4:00 pm
Ely Callaway, founder of the Callaway Golf Co., died early Thursday morning at his home in Rancho Santa Fe, Calif.
 
His cause of death was pancreatic cancer. He was 82 years-old.
 
'Ely passed away quietly at his home at about 2:30 a.m. while being attended by his family, a few close friends and medical staff,' said spokesman Larry Dorman.
 
Free Video - Registration Required Ely Callaway Dies at Age 82
 
Doctors discovered a tumor on Callaways pancreas two months ago during a surgery to remove his gall bladder. He resinged as president and chief executive officer May 15.
 
Ron Drapeau was named Callaway's successor.
 
Callaway was hospitalized for six weeks before finally being released June 4. He had been resting at home ever since.
 
Ely Callaway at the podiumRevolutionizing the game of golf was just part of Callway's very successful professional life.
 
Born June 3, 1919 in LaGrange, Ga., Callaway graduated from Emory University in 1940. He joined the U.S. Army at the age of 21, where he was assigned to the Armys Centralized Procurement Agency for textiles and clothing at the Philadelphia Quartermaster Depot.
 
He served in that post through the end of World War II, then accepted a sales position with a textile firm, now known as Milliken & Co.
 
Callaway soon moved to Burlington Industries, Inc., then the worlds largest textile company. By 1968, he was president and director of the company.
 
In the mid-1970s, Callaway turned his attention to the entrepreneurial business. He founded Callaway Vineyard and Winery in Southern California in 1974 and grew the company for nine years.
 
He then entered the world of golf.
 
Free Video - Registration Required Ely Callaway's Impact on the golf world
 
Callaway first made his mark in the game in 1982, when he purchased a small equipment company called Hickory Stick USA for $400,000.
 
It was not long thereafter, however, that he began refashioning not only the company, but the entire industry, becoming the games technological ' and sometimes controversial ' leader with regard to equipment.
 
In the late 80s, the S2H2 was Callaways premier product, which was a driver that featured a revolutionary bore-through shaft design, the first-ever of its kind.
 
That club ultimately led to the creation of Callaways most famed product, The Big Bertha, which was the first oversized driver to hit the market in 1991.
 
Callaway would next delve into irons and eventually into the golf ball business.
 
All ventures found great and immediate success. In fact, Callaway's sales skyrocketed from approximately $5 million in '88 to $800 million in '98.
 
The companys latest controversial product came in the form of the ERC II driver, which was deemed illegal and subsequently banned by the United States Golf Association because of the spring-like effect it imparted to the golf ball through its thin face.
 
Free Video - Registration Required Ely Callaway Introduces the ERC II Driver
 
Ely Callaway and the USGA's David Fay debate over the ERC II
 
Callaway was bold, but never brash. Throughout the hype and hoopla created by his creations, Ely always maintained he was just trying to make the game a little easier for the consumer.
 
Weve sold $5 billion in golf clubs since Callaway started from nothing, which is far more than anybody in the world has ever done, he said in January. And we want to keep on making clubs that are going to make people happier.
 
Callaway is survived by his wife, Lucinda Villa; a sister, Lula Callaway Albright; three children, Reeves, Lisa and Nicholas; and four grandchildren.
 
Free Video - Registration Required Players react to the loss of Ely Callaway
 
Barr on Business: 'Goodbye, Mr. Callaway'
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Salas (62) leads LPGA's Indy Women in Tech

By Associated PressAugust 17, 2018, 12:50 am

INDIANAPOLIS - Lizette Salas matched the Brickyard Crossing record with a 10-under 62 on Thursday in the Indy Women in Tech Championship, making birdie on the final three holes for a two-stroke lead over fast-starting Angel Yin and Japan's Nasa Hataoka.

Yin birdied eight of the first nine holes in her morning round for a front-nine 8-under 28 - one short of the LPGA Tour's nine-hole record. It matched the third-lowest nine-hole score in relation to par in tour history.


Full-field scores from Indy Women in Tech Championship


Salas eagled the par-5 second in the afternoon and added three straight birdies on Nos. 4-6. She birdied Nos. 12 and 14 before reeling off three more in a row to close, waiting out a late 77-minute suspension for an approaching storm.

Salas matched the course record set by Mike McCullough in the PGA Tour Champions' 1999 Comfort Classic.

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Sordet opens with 62 to grab lead at Nordea Masters

By Associated PressAugust 16, 2018, 11:23 pm

GOTHENBURG, Sweden - Clement Sordet opened with four straight birdies to shoot 8-under 62 and take the first-round lead of the Nordea Masters on Thursday.

Sordet says ''I wasn't really focusing on the score, I was just enjoying it.''

The Frenchman, who shot his lowest European Tour round, has a two-stroke lead over Scott Jamieson of Scotland and Lee Slattery of England.

Hunter Stewart is the highest-placed American after a 5-under 65 left him on a four-way tie for fourth with Christofer Blomstrand, Tapio Pulkkanen and Richard Green.

Defending champion Renato Paratore's hopes of becoming the first player to successfully retain the title look in doubt after the Italian shot 9-over 79 at Hills Golf Club.

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Peterson confirms plans to play Web.com Finals

By Will GrayAugust 16, 2018, 9:17 pm

After flirting with retirement for much of the summer, John Peterson confirmed that he will give it one more shot in the upcoming Web.com Tour Finals.

Peterson, 29, had planned to walk away from the game and begin a career in real estate in his native Texas if he failed to secure PGA Tour status before his medical extension expired. His T-13 finish last month at The Greenbrier appeared to be enough to net the former NCAA champ at least conditional status, but a closer look at the numbers revealed he missed out by 0.58 points in his last available start.


Full-field scores from Wyndham Championship

Wyndham Championship: Articles, photos and videos


But Peterson was buoyed by the support he received from his peers at The Greenbrier, and when he got into the Barbasol Championship as a late alternate he decided to make the trip to the tournament. He tied for 21st that week in Kentucky, clinching enough non-member FedExCup points to grant him a spot in the four-event Finals.

Last month Peterson hinted that he would consider playing in the Finals, where 25 PGA Tour cards for the 2018-19 season will be up for grabs, and Thursday he confirmed in an Instagram post that he will give his pro career "one last push."

The Finals kick off next week in Ohio with the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship and will conclude Sept. 20-23 with the Web.com Tour Championship. Peterson will be looking to rekindle his results from 2013, when he finished T-5 or better at each of the four Finals events while earning fully-exempt status as the top money earner.

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Lyle honored with sand sculpture at Wyndham

By Golf Channel DigitalAugust 16, 2018, 9:00 pm

Jarrod Lyle passed away last week at the age of 36 after losing his third battle with cancer.

And after a PGA Championship filled with tributes to the Australian, the Wyndham Championship found its own way to keep his legacy alive at the North Carolina Tour stop.

Next to the Wyndham Championship and PGA Tour logos carved into the sand on site at Sedgefield Country Club is Lyle's name and the "Leuk the Duck" mascot. The duck has become synonymous with Challenge, an organization that supports kids with cancer.

Fellow Aussie Stuart Appleby posted the display on social media:

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(Pic update) Brighter is better

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Lyle was also remembered in a more traditional manner on the first tee, where his bag and trademark yellow bucket hat were prominently displayed.