Which was your favorite major of 2012?

By Jason SobelAugust 14, 2012, 5:17 pm

This year's majors are history, which leaves us only one thing to decide: Which one was your favorite? Was it Bubba Watson hitting his improbably hooked wedge to set up an overtime Masters win? Or Webb Simpson taking advantage of Jim Furyk’s late stumble in the U.S. Open? Or Ernie Els returning to major-championship relevance with his British Open victory (at Adam Scott’s expense)? Or Rory McIlroy putting on another dominating performance in the PGA Championship?

We asked our writers to pick their favorites. They were only too happy to oblige.


BY JASON SOBEL

We witnessed some pretty dramatic moments at the four major championships this year. Steady, solid Jim Furyk yanking one off the tee and eventually losing the U.S. Open. Adam Scott finishing with four consecutive bogeys to relinquish the. Open Championship to Ernie Els. Rory McIlroy once again blowing away a major field at the PGA Championship.

For my money, though, I'll always remember the 2012 majors for one thing more than any other.

It was the year some dude named Bubba won himself a green jacket.

This year's Masters Tournament was a fun-filled roller-coaster of thrills and despair. Phil Mickelson hit one of the all-time flop shots on Saturday, then flubbed one righty on Sunday. Louis Oosthuizen carded an albatross, but later lost in a playoff.

Then there's the aforementioned Bubba Watson, a big-hitting country boy who in many ways is the antithesis of the austere Augusta National membership. His hooked wedge from the trees to win on the second playoff hole was one for the ages.

And it helped the Masters lay claim to being the best major of 2012.


BY RANDALL MELL

Americans chanting Rory McIlroy’s name along the dunes on the shores of Kiawah Island will stay with us a long time. The Northern Irishman may have taken all the drama out of the PGA Championship on Sunday, but he left us a masterpiece doing so.

The victory is not quite there with Tiger Woods’ 15-shot triumph at the 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, or his 12-shot runaway at the '97 Masters. It’s not there with the unforgettable effort Jack Nicklaus gave us winning his last major at the Masters in '86, but it’s in the same wing of the museum with those works of art.

McIlroy gave us one of golf’s Rembrandts with his final-round bogey-free performance in blowing away the field by a PGA Championship-record eight shots.

Bubba Watson’s Masters victory was thrilling, Webb Simpson’s win at Olympic was classic U.S. Open survival golf, and Ernie Els’ British Open triumph after the epic collapse of Adam Scott was emotionally gripping, but McIlroy’s masterpiece will be remembered for the ruthless beauty that sets it apart as one of the game’s great major championship victories.


BY REX HOGGARD

Picking the year’s best major is akin to naming your favorite Beatles tune. 2012 has been an embarrassment of Grand Slam riches from Bubba Watson’s Masters magic act to Rory McIlroy’s PGA walk-off. Only one, however, delivered equal parts triumph and tragedy – the Open Championship.

Although Jim Furyk’s collapse and Webb Simpson’s performance at the U.S. Open certainly qualify as a complete drama, the last hour at Lytham was major pressure at its most extreme.

With the engraver’s hand poised over the claret jug and cruising along with a four-stroke advantage with four holes to play, Adam Scott closed with four consecutive bogeys. It may have lacked the theatrics of Jean Van de Velde’s Carnoustie collapse, but given the Australian’s pedigree and performance through 67 holes it was no less shocking.

It is Ernie Els’ epic charge that stands the British Open above all others, however. The South African’s final-nine 32 was epic, capped by a winding 15-footer for birdie at the last.

Just four months earlier the South African, a decade removed from his last major victory and driven to extremes (the long putter) in an attempt to rediscover his game, was scrambling just to play in the majors.

It was, with apologies to Scott, the perfect finish. The perfect major.


BY RYAN LAVNER

The best major of 2012? Certainly, it has to be the one with the best finish. (Sorry, Ernie.) Deep in the pine straw, on the second hole of a sudden-death playoff, at the most iconic course in the U.S., Bubba Watson played a seemingly unfathomable, wickedly curving wedge from the trees on the 10th hole, a shot that nestled to within 15 feet of the cup and set up the win at the Masters.

Spine-tingling stuff.

Average golfers either whiff attempting that shot or, worse, hit themselves in the shin. Few Tour players even have the capacity to imagine that shot, let alone the audacity to pull it off at that critical juncture. And, come on, how good a story was that? A guy with awesome power and a homemade swing . . . and a newly adopted baby back home in Florida . . . and his mom waiting by the edge of the green . . . and his alma mater, the University of Georgia, only two hours away, so the delirious Bulldogs fans barked and cheered his name . . . and all of this less than two years after Bubba’s father passed away, the emotions from which were still quite raw.

The 2013 Masters, and beyond, will have a hard time topping that.

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Weather extends Barbasol to Monday finish

By Associated PressJuly 23, 2018, 12:25 am

NICHOLASVILLE, Ky. - A thunderstorm has suspended the fourth round of the PGA Tour's Barbasol Championship until Monday morning.

Sunday's third stoppage of play at Champions Trace at Keene Trace Golf Club came with the four leaders - Hunter Mahan, Robert Streb, Tom Lovelady and Troy Merritt at 18 under par - and four other contenders waiting to begin the round.

The tournament will resume at 7:30 a.m. on Monday. Lightning caused one delay, and play was stopped earlier in the afternoon to clear water that accumulated on the course following a morning of steady and sometimes-heavy rain.

Inclement weather has plagued the tournament throughout the weekend. The second round was completed Saturday morning after being suspended by thunderstorms late Friday afternoon.

The resumption will mark the PGA Tour's second Monday finish this season. Jason Day won the Farmers Insurance Open in January after darkness delayed the sixth playoff hole, and he needed just 13 minutes to claim the victory.

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Watch: Spectator films as Woods' shot hits him

By Will GrayJuly 23, 2018, 12:07 am

It was a collision watched by millions of fans on television, and one that came at a pivotal juncture as Tiger Woods sought to win The Open. It also gave Colin Hauck the story of a lifetime.

Hauck was among dozens of fans situated along the left side of the 11th hole during the final round at Carnoustie as the pairing of Woods and Francesco Molinari hit their approach shots. After 10 holes of nearly flawless golf, Woods missed the fairway off the tee and then pulled his iron well left of the target.

The ball made square contact with Hauck, who hours later tweeted a video showing the entire sequence - even as he continued to record after Woods' shot sent him tumbling to the ground:

The bounce initially appeared fortuitous for Woods, as his ball bounded away from thicker rough and back toward the green. But an ambitious flop shot came up short, and he eventually made a double bogey to go from leading by a shot to trailing by one. He ultimately shot an even-par 71, tying for sixth two shots behind Molinari.

For his efforts as a human shield, Hauck received a signed glove and a handshake from Woods - not to mention a firsthand video account that will be sure to spark plenty of conversations in the coming years.

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Molinari retirement plan: coffee, books and Twitter

By Will GrayJuly 22, 2018, 9:35 pm

After breaking through for his first career major, Francesco Molinari now has a five-year exemption on the PGA Tour, a 10-year exemption in Europe and has solidified his standing as one of the best players in the world.

But not too long ago, the 35-year-old Italian was apparently thinking about life after golf.

Shortly after Molinari rolled in a final birdie putt to close out a two-shot victory at The Open, fellow Tour player Wesley Bryan tweeted a picture of a note that he wrote after the two played together during the third round of the WGC-HSBC Champions in China in October. In it, Bryan shared Molinari's plans to retire as early as 2020 to hang out at cafes and "become a Twitter troll":

Molinari is active on the social media platform, with more than 5,600 tweets sent out to nearly 150,000 followers since joining in 2010. But after lifting the claret jug at Carnoustie, it appears one of the few downsides of Molinari's victory is that the golf world won't get to see the veteran turn into a caffeinated, well-read troll anytime soon.

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Molinari had previously avoided Carnoustie on purpose

By Rex HoggardJuly 22, 2018, 9:17 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Sometimes a course just fits a player’s eye. They can’t really describe why, but more often than not it leads to solid finishes.

Francesco Molinari’s relationship with Carnoustie isn’t like that.

The Italian played his first major at Carnoustie, widely considered the toughest of all The Open venues, in 2007, and his first impression hasn’t really changed.

“There was nothing comforting about it,” he said on Sunday following a final-round 69 that lifted him to a two-stroke victory.


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In fact, following that first exposure to the Angus coast brute, Molinari has tried to avoid Carnoustie, largely skipping the Dunhill Links Championship, one of the European Tour’s marquee events, throughout his career.

“To be completely honest, it's one of the reasons why I didn't play the Dunhill Links in the last few years, because I got beaten up around here a few times in the past,” he said. “I didn't particularly enjoy that feeling. It's a really tough course. You can try and play smart golf, but some shots, you just have to hit it straight. There's no way around it. You can't really hide.”

Molinari’s relative dislike for the layout makes his performance this week even more impressive considering he played his last 37 holes bogey-free.

“To play the weekend bogey-free, it's unthinkable, to be honest. So very proud of today,” he said.