Ultimate Match Play: Round 1 results; Round 2 matchups

By Jason SobelJanuary 29, 2013, 11:00 am

Our 16-man field for the Ultimate Match Play Championship has been whittled down to the Elite Eight.

And it’s a very Elite Eight, indeed. (Click for: Ultimate Match Play overview | Player bios)

Higher seeds Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods, Ben Hogan, Bobby Jones, Sam Snead and Arnold Palmer easily cruised through their opening-round matches with each player receiving at least three-quarters of the GolfChannel.com online vote, while Gary Player and Tom Watson narrowly pulled out mild upsets to advance.

(1) Jack Nicklaus def. (16) Phil Mickelson

Some believed that despite 18 career major championship titles, the top-ranked Nicklaus might struggle against fan favorite Phil Mickelson in the first round, but the Golden Bear received 92.8 percent of the votes to move on to the next frame in the bracket as the leading vote-getter thus far.


(9) Gary Player def. (8) Walter Hagen

Nicklaus will face longtime friend and rival Player in the second round. As the No. 9 seed in the tournament, Player barely ousted Walter Hagen, taking just 51 percent of the vote in that match – easily the closest in the competition so far.

“The only way to rank players is through the record books,” Player recently said on 'Morning Drive.' “All I know is he was a very great character. He might have arrived at the tee in his dining suit and I would have arrived after exercising – and he might have still beat me.”

Not this time.

The combined numbers between Nicklaus and Player are astounding. Together they own 97 career PGA Tour victories, including 27 majors. Extend that to global success and they’ve combined for well over 200 wins, easily the biggest total of any of the four second-round matchups.


(2) Tiger Woods def. (15) Seve Ballesteros

Much like the NCAA basketball tournament, the match between the 2 and 15 seeds featured a closer-than-expected result. Woods received “only” 78.9 percent of the vote against Ballesteros, though the noted short-game wizard could not extricate himself from trouble against the 14-time major champion.


(10) Tom Watson def. (7) Byron Nelson

The tournament’s ultra-intriguing matches continue, as Woods will square off against Watson in the next round. Playing his longtime mentor in the first round, Watson upended Byron Nelson by receiving 54.4 percent of the vote to move on to another much anticipated matchup.

This one will feature Woods playing against the man who will serve as his Ryder Cup captain next year at Gleaneagles – and despite having the same initials and both playing collegiately at Stanford University, they haven’t always seen eye to eye.

Though Watson has criticized him for not always “respecting the game,” he was effusive in his praise for Woods when named captain on Dec. 13.

“He's the best player maybe in the history of the game,” Watson maintained. “My relationship with Tiger is fine. Whatever has been said before is water under the bridge, no issues. … Obviously there's nobody else in the golf world who wanted to win more than Tiger, and he did it for so many years. He dominated this sport unlike anybody in the history of the sport.”


(3) Ben Hogan def. (14) Nick Faldo

In what was no doubt a frosty match with few words, Hogan defeated Nick Faldo with 88 percent of the vote in the opening round. As the No. 3 seed in the tournament, the Hawk figures to be a tough out because of a legion of fans who still revere his shot-making talents and ability to recover from a near-fatal car accident.


(6) Arnold Palmer def. (11) Gene Sarazen

Hogan will meet Arnold Palmer in the second stanza – and Arnie’s Army, too. One of the most popular players of all time, Palmer was buoyed by a 86 percent vote in his victory over Gene Sarazen.

Much like the dynamic between Watson and Woods, Hogan and Palmer also owned a complex relationship, with the elder often failing to recognize the aggressive youngster.

“Well, it was more a standoff relationship,” Palmer said in a 2009 radio interview. “It wasn’t what I would call the warmest relationship in the world, although I certainly had a great deal of respect for Ben Hogan and what he accomplished in the game. I think that it would be safe to say that from a distance we were friends, but we were never very close and of course one of the things that you just mentioned had something to do with that and the fact that it was always ‘Hi fella’ rather than calling me by my name.”


(4) Bobby Jones def. (13) Lee Trevino

The only amateur remaining in the tournament, Jones took 77.6 percent of the vote against Lee Trevino to continue his pursuit of a title against a field of pay-for-play performers.


(5) Sam Snead def. (12) Billy Casper

Jones will square off against Snead, the PGA Tour’s all-time leading winner, in the second round. Perhaps surprisingly, Snead received the second-highest vote total in the opening round, garnering 90.2 percent to breeze past Billy Casper.

Once again, this second-round matchup will feature two men between whom there was plenty of bad blood. Snead struggled with his putting, employing various methods throughout his career. When he found success using a croquet style in 1967, it was Jones who brought up his contempt for the method with U.S. Golf Association executive director Joseph C. Dey. One year later, the USGA and R&A jointly banned croquet style putting.

Voting is now open for the four second-round matches, with winners announced on Feb. 5.

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Ryu wins Meijer Classic by 2 shots

By Associated PressJune 17, 2018, 9:46 pm

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. - So Yeon Ryu won the Meijer LPGA Classic on Sunday for her first victory of the season and sixth overall, closing with a 5-under 67 for a two-stroke margin.

The 29-year-old South Korean player birdied the par-5 16th and par-4 17th and parred the par-4 18th to finish at 21-under 267 at Blythefield Country Club.

Two strokes behind Anna Nordqvist and Lee-Anne Pace entering the round, Ryu had six birdies and a bogey in the final round.


Full-field scores from the Meijer LPGA Classic


Caroline Masson was second after a 68. Lydia Ko shot a 67 to finish third at 18 under.

Nordqvist and Pace each shot 73 - after each had a 64 on Saturday - to tie for fourth at 17 under with Jacqui Concolino (66), Azahara Munoz (68) and Angela Stanford (70).

U.S. Women's Open winner Ariya Jutanugarn shot a tournament-record 62. She birdied five of the first seven holes, eagled No. 8 and added three more birdies to finish 12th at 15 under.

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Fleetwood fires 63, waits to see if score is enough

By Rex HoggardJune 17, 2018, 8:52 pm

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – Tommy Fleetwood became the sixth player to shoot 63 at the U.S. Open, and just the second to do it in the final round. Now he waits.

Fleetwood teed off almost 2 ½ hours before – and six strokes behind – the leaders at Shinnecock Hills on Sunday, but stormed into the hunt thanks to four consecutive birdies starting at the 12th hole. The Englishman’s round was even more impressive considering he didn’t birdie either of the layout’s par 5s.


U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


Fleetwood finished at 2 over par – after missing a 9-foot putt for birdie and 62 at the 18th – which was tied for second place and one stroke off the lead held by Brooks Koepka when he completed his round.

After speaking with the media, Fleetwood went to the locker room to await a possible playoff, which was changed this year from an 18-hole overtime to just two holes of aggregate play.

“We'll go and relax a little bit and just see,” said Fleetwood, who rolled in 159 feet of birdies putts. “Only time will tell what's going to happen today at the course. If it was like yesterday, I'd feel a little more comfortable than now.”

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Fowler follows 84 with 65, praises Shinnecock setup

By Rex HoggardJune 17, 2018, 5:44 pm

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – As promised, the USGA dialed back Shinnecock Hills for Sunday’s final round, watering the greens overnight and deferring to more user-friendly hole locations.

The evidence of this was on the leaderboard, with four early finishers having shot under-par rounds, including Rickie Fowler, who closed with a round-of-the-week 65. There were just three under-par cards on Saturday.

“That's the golf course I enjoy playing. Obviously, pin placements were a lot safer,” said Fowler, who had just one bogey on Sunday and opened his day with a 4-under 31 on his opening nine. “The pins today will definitely allow for the greens to firm up and get fast, and we'll see how much they dry out. It was definitely more receptive this morning than yesterday, that's for sure.”


U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


It was a 19-stroke turnaround for Fowler, who ballooned to a third-round 84 on Day 3 during what most contend were the week’s toughest conditions. Fowler had put himself into contention going into the weekend thanks to a second-round 69, but struggled on Saturday afternoon like much of the field.

Fowler said the setup was vastly different to what players faced on Saturday and that even if the winds increase for the afternoon tee times the course will remain playable, unlike Round 3 when many players said the USGA “lost” the golf course.

“They did a good job of staying safe,” Fowler said, “because if it does dry out, it will still be very playable.”

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Phil celebrates par on 13, ducks media after round

By Ryan LavnerJune 17, 2018, 5:35 pm

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – Phil Mickelson didn’t have another meltdown at the U.S. Open.

Back on the 13th green Sunday – less than 24 hours after taking a two-shot penalty for hitting a moving ball and recording a sextuple-bogey 10 – Mickelson poured in a 10-footer and raised his arms in mock triumph, as if he’d finally won that elusive major title.

Not quite.

He’d simply made par.

“It looked like he won the Masters,” said playing partner Rickie Fowler. “He didn’t jump, but he had a little celebration there.”


U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


The par save and the final-round 69 were one of the lone bright spots during what was an adventurous week for Lefty, even by his unpredictable standards. Mickelson’s shocking swat was still the talk of this Open, especially after USGA executive director Mike Davis revealed Saturday night that Mickelson had called him to ask for more clarification on the rule he said that he knew he’d broken.

Despite some calls for him to withdraw from the tournament, Mickelson displayed his usual cheerful demeanor inside the ropes with Fowler.

“He joked about it right as we went down the first hole,” Fowler said.

Fowler said that he didn’t know “if I would have had the wits like Phil to run after it” on 13, but added that it never should have come to that in the first place.

“He could have saved himself a shot by just letting it go and taking unplayable, but then that would still look pretty funny too,” he said. “The course shouldn’t play that way.”

If you’re wondering whether Mickelson would be defiant or contrite on Sunday, we don’t know the answer. He declined to stop and speak with the media, deciding instead to sign autographs for more than a half hour and then offering a few short answers before ducking into player hospitality.

“The real question is, ‘What am I going to do next?’” he said. “I don’t know.”