Kaymer better suited to handle major spotlight

By Jason SobelJune 16, 2014, 2:09 am

PINEHURST, N.C. – Martin Kaymer won the 114th U.S. Open championship by a million and one strokes on Sunday, which should once again vault him directly into the spotlight.

He’ll become a household name. His Q-rating will skyrocket. Hey, maybe he’ll even get a bag deal.

That’s terrific news, right? Well, not exactly.

There’s a strange juxtaposition in the world of professional golf. Those who gravitate toward the game at a young age for its insular nature, spending so many lonesome hours on the range in solitary pursuit of finding a secret in the dirt, often become proficient enough that they are eventually thrust into the limelight.

We expect them to be congenial and affable. We expect them to walk in the confident footsteps of Arnold Palmer and Seve Ballesteros and Phil Mickelson. We expect them to act like superstars.

Kaymer has been in this position before. He won the 2010 PGA Championship and became the world’s No. 1-ranked player six months later.

And he hated it. Or at least, he didn’t really enjoy it.

Not the part about reaching the pinnacle of what every golfer strives for, but living life in that bubble. Absorbing attention when he never actually craved it.



He talked about this last year. It was during a quiet moment on a practice green, after his No. 1 ranking had ballooned to something more inconspicuous. After his major championship win had been surpassed by so many others.

“Everything you do, everything you say, all of a sudden becomes very important. You’re not really used to that,” he said at the time. “Tiger [Woods] grew up with it since he was a child –all the media, all the attention. But for the rest of us, it’s not normal. It really takes some time.”

It’s not that he’s unaccommodating. In fact, the very opposite is true. Kaymer is considerate to a fault. He’s been asked to address the swing changes which led to his downfall in recent years so many times that it would leave most other players spitting fire when asked again. He simply tries to explain it for the thousandth time in the same way as the first.

He deflects attention, rather than coveting it. He is humble, not boastful. He is unassuming, pleasant, cordial and attentive – basically, everything we hope our superstar athletes will be and nothing we expect.

All of that will be on display as he once again finds himself in the spotlight.

He will be asked questions that he wasn’t asked when ranked 68th just two months ago. He will be followed by cameras that didn’t follow him when he wasn’t winning tournaments.

And he believes he’ll handle the celebrity much better than he did before.

“Four years ago I didn't know what's happening,” he explained after Sunday’s runaway victory. “I was not expecting myself to win a major at 25. I was surprised about my performance. I was surprised about a lot of things. I couldn't handle a lot of things that happened in Germany, all the attention that I could get. And then becoming No. 1 in the world, that added another thing. And it was too much.”

At this point, the always sincere Kaymer allows a bit more into his psyche than most of his peers ever would.

“To be completely honest, it was very difficult to handle everything and to play good golf. So right now I am OK with talking to you in a very calm, normal, relaxed way, as if we were having a normal conversation. In the past, I always think I have to say something special and something that might be interesting. Now I just talk and it's a lot easier for me.”

Therein lies the secret as to why he might find more success in the wake of this major championship than he did after the last one.

Swing changes aside, his struggles following the PGA title might have been more directly correlated to spending time in the spotlight. They may have been the effect of a player achieving success in a solitary pursuit, then being forced to constantly explain it.

Kaymer is older now, 29, and wiser to the ways of the world. He’s endured attention thrust upon him and witnessed it being hauled away. He is better prepared for the perpetual glaze of eyeballs staring at him wherever he goes.

He understands this, too. When asked about this prospect following his U.S. Open win, Kaymer just smiled knowingly.

Then he answered: “It’s not exhausting for me anymore.”

Getty Images

Tiger Tracker: 147th Open Championship

By Tiger TrackerJuly 22, 2018, 8:30 am

Tiger Woods begins the final round of the 147th Open Championship four shots off the lead. He's out at 9:25 a.m. ET on Sunday and we're tracking him.


Getty Images

How to watch The Open on TV and online

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 22, 2018, 8:30 am

You want to watch the 147th Open? Here’s how you can do it.

Golf Channel and NBC Sports will be televising 182 hours of overall programming from the men's third major of the year at Carnoustie

In addition to the traditional coverage, the two networks will showcase three live alternate feeds: marquee groups, featured holes (our new 3-hole channel) and spotlight action. You can also watch replays of full-day coverage, Thursday-Sunday, in the Golf Channel app, NBC Sports apps, and on GolfChannel.com.  

Here’s the weekly TV schedule, with live stream links in parentheses. You can view all the action on the Golf Channel mobile, as well. Alternate coverage is noted in italics:

(All times Eastern; GC=Golf Channel; NBC=NBC Sports; GC.com=GolfChannel.com or check the GLE app)

Monday, July 16

GC: 7-9AM: Morning Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: 9-11AM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)

GC: 7-9PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Tuesday, July 17

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Wednesday, July 18

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Thursday, July 19

GC: Midnight-1:30AM: Midnight Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: Day 1: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Friday, July 20

GC: Day 2: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Saturday, July 21

GC: Day 3: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 3: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 3-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Sunday, July 22

GC: Day 4: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 4: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 2:30-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)

Getty Images

Schauffele just fine being the underdog

By Rex HoggardJuly 21, 2018, 8:06 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Following a breakthough season during which he won twice and collected the PGA Tour Rookie of the Year Award, Xander Schauffele concedes his sophomore campaign has been less than stellar, but that could all change on Sunday at The Open.

Schauffele followed a second-round 66 with a 67 on Saturday to take a share of the 9-under-par lead with Jordan Spieth and Kevin Kisner.

Although he hasn’t won in 2018, he did finish runner-up at The Players and tied for sixth at the U.S. Open, two of the year’s toughest tests.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


“Growing up, I always hit it well and played well in tough conditions,” Schauffele said. “I wasn't the guy to shoot 61. I was the guy to shoot like 70 when it was playing really hard.”

Sunday’s pairing could make things even more challenging when he’ll head out in the day’s final tee time with Spieth, the defending champion. But being the underdog in a pairing, like he was on Saturday alongside Rory McIlroy, is not a problem.

“All the guys I've talked to said, 'Live it up while you can, fly under the radar,'” he said. “Today I played in front of what you call Rory's crowd and guys were just yelling all the time, even while he's trying to putt, and he had to step off a few times. No one was yelling at me while I was putting. So I kind of enjoy just hanging back and relaxing.”

Getty Images

Open odds: Spieth 7/1 to win; Tiger, Rory 14/1

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 21, 2018, 7:54 pm

Only 18 holes remain in the 147th Open Championship at Carnoustie, and the man tied atop the leaderboard is the same man who captured the claret jug last year at Royal Birkdale.

So it’s little surprise that Jordan Spieth is the odds-on favorite (7/4) to win his fourth major entering Sunday’s final round.

Xander Schauffele and Kevin Kisner, both tied with Spieth at 9 under par, are next in line at 5/1 and 11/2 respectively. Tiger Woods and Rory McIlroy, both four shots behind the leaders, are listed at 14/1.

Click here for the leaderboard and take a look below at the odds, courtesy Jeff Sherman at golfodds.com.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


Jordan Spieth: 7/4

Xander Schauffele: 5/1

Kevin Kisner: 11/2

Tiger Woods: 14/1

Francesco Molinari: 14/1

Rory McIlroy: 14/1

Kevin Chappell: 20/1

Tommy Fleetwood: 20/1

Alex Noren: 25/1

Zach Johnson: 30/1

Justin Rose: 30/1

Matt Kuchar: 40/1

Webb Simpson: 50/1

Adam Scott: 80/1

Tony Finau: 80/1

Charley Hoffman: 100/1

Austin Cook: 100/1