The Olympic Club primed for difficult U.S. Open

By Jason SobelJune 13, 2012, 10:52 pm

SAN FRANCISCO – Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me right around this time every year, shame on the world's best golfers.

There is a U.S. Open Championship taking place this week, which means there is already major championship-level grousing about just how difficult the conditions are going to be.

Without fail, it happens in the days prior to every edition of the game’s greatest annual four-day grind. Competitors are asked their thoughts on everything from the severity of the setup to what the winning score will be. Almost instinctually, their brows become furrowed and their noses scrunched as if they just a sucked a bag of lemons. Like patients being interviewed before a root canal, one-by-one they proffer the cloudiest of gloom-and-doom scenarios.

The glass isn’t half-empty. It’s leaking from all sides.

“There's something on every hole that can get you,” Bubba Watson explained. “It makes it very difficult.”


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“I think this probably tests the player,” Tiger Woods said, “more than any other championship.”

“Most of the time par is a good score and it's a grind out there,” Luke Donald added. “They make it tough on us.”

The “they” in question is the USGA, which to its own admission isn’t running a daycare center for the world’s best golfers. When asked after the appropriately nicknamed “Massacre at Winged Foot” in 1974 whether the organization was trying to embarrass competitors, executive director Sandy Tatum famously responded, “No, we're trying to identify them.'

And boy, have they identified them. Shaking their heads and shaking their fists. Muttering and shuddering. Psyched out instead of psyched up.

It’s one reason that Jack Nicklaus – winner of four of these tournaments in his career – once said, “A lot of players are eliminated the moment the tournament starts.”

Prior to Rory McIlroy winning last year’s edition of the event with a 16-under-par score on a soggy Congressional Country Club, the previous 10 champions had combined for just a 14-under-par total, with two winners at over par and two others at even.

To most competitors, that’s scarier than tight-roping across the Golden Gate Bridge.

“It's going to be all about mental,” said Watson, who won the Masters two months ago. “You know you're going to make mistakes; you know you're going to make bogeys. You have to keep going. What is par, 70? It's not really 70. It's over par. Five-over at the end of the week, just like at Oakmont [in 2007], probably has a great shot at winning.”

This week’s U.S. Open will take place at The Olympic Club, which hasn’t been part of the host rotation since 1998, giving players ample reason to be sufficiently freaked out entering the first round.

Already we’ve heard pity parties from the field, as if everyone who isn’t competing this week should sympathize with their plight of having to play in the national championship.

The opening six holes are supposedly the most brutal opening stretch ever witnessed; some have argued that 4- or 5-over could be among the best scores on those holes each day. The 13th and 14th holes have nowhere to miss. The 16th hole measures 670 yards, though it may be more imposing to say it’s nearly two-fifths of a mile. The final hole features a green that could fit inside your kitchen.

Sound intimidating? Perhaps Matt Kuchar summed it up best when he deadpanned, “The first 18 holes are extremely difficult.”

It’s enough to leave those watching on the couch at home quivering to the point that Cheetos cheese dust is readily shaking off their fingers.

It also leads to an all-too-appropriate question in response: Are this week’s gloom-and-doom proclamations legitimate or will they be completely unfounded?

We won’t have an answer to that query until the tournament is well under way, but oftentimes this is the case – and maybe it’s by design.

Just as players in the current NBA Finals will flop, dive and otherwise work to convince the referees for favorable calls, this is golf’s version of that strategy. Think about it: If players maintained this was a relatively easy setup prior to the tournament rounds commencing, they’d likely find a more difficult track come Thursday morning. Instead, the opposite is true, with pessimistic attitudes likely driving a kinder, gentler USGA plan that will negate any potentially “unfair” conditions.

Whatever the case, the song remains the same entering this U.S. Open. Listen to the competitors and they’ll have you believe this tournament is golf’s equivalent to reaching the final level of Angry Birds.

We should reserve assessment until play has started and scores are actually being posted. If you believe those who have reached this level, though, expect more angry this week and fewer birds.

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Lauren Thompson and a giant 'gator eating a turtle

By Grill Room TeamApril 19, 2018, 4:53 pm

Really, the headline says it all.

"Morning Drive" co-host Lauren Thompson was playing the Ritz Carlton Grande Lakes on Thursday in Orlando, Fla., when her threesome turned into a foursome, with the appearance of a giant alligator. Techincally, it was a fivesome, as the 'gator had a turtle in its mouth.



Hey, it's a slow news week for Grill Room.

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Sources confirm Charles Schwab to sponsor Colonial event

By Rex HoggardApril 19, 2018, 2:42 pm

Multiple sources have confirmed to GolfChannel.com that officials at Colonial are poised to announce a new sponsorship agreement with Charles Schwab Corporation.

Tournament officials scrambled this year after Dean & DeLuca ended its sponsorship of the event just two years into a six-year agreement, pulling together an assortment of local sponsors and renaming the event the Fort Worth Invitational.

Colonial’s status on the PGA Tour schedule became even more uncertain when the PGA Championship announced it would move from August to May, beginning in 2019 as part of a major overhaul of the circuit’s schedule.

According to the Dallas News, and confirmed by multiple sources at the club, officials plan to announce the new long-term agreement with Charles Schwab on Monday that will begin in 2019.

News of a long-term sponsorship deal would also suggest the event will remain in May in 2019 and beyond. The Tour has indicated it plans to announce the ’19 schedule at next month’s Players Championship.

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PNC Extends Title Sponsorship of PNC Father/Son Challenge

By Golf Channel Public RelationsApril 19, 2018, 1:00 pm

ORLANDO, Fla., April 19, 2018 – IMG and NBC Sports today announced that The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. has extended its contract as title sponsor of the PNC Father/Son Challenge, the tournament that pairs the games’ legends alongside their sons, daughters and grandchildren.

PNC’s multi-year extension as title sponsor keeps the PGA Tour Challenge Event in Orlando reflecting the bank’s commitment to Central Florida. PNC has served as title sponsor of the tournament since 2012. The Ritz-Carlton Golf Club Orlando, Grande Lakes will continue to play host to the PNC Father/Son Challenge. The 2018 PNC Father/Son Challenge will take place Friday-Sunday, Dec. 14-16, with television coverage on Golf Channel and NBC.

“The PNC Father/Son Challenge long ago became one of my family’s favorite golf tournaments,” said 18-time major champion Jack Nicklaus. “I have had the pleasure of playing with my sons, and last year, partnering with my 15-year-old grandson GT was a thrill. I am delighted the event—a uniquely special one to us fathers and grandfathers, and perhaps to the many fans out there watching from home or outside the ropes—will continue for many years to come.”

“After our victory in 2016, I said that this win was as good as anything I have done in my career,” said former World No. 1 and major champion David Duval, who alongside his stepson Nick Karavites captured the 2016 title. “I felt blessed to have Nick inside the ropes with me and to have our family surrounding us all week. That’s what makes the PNC Father/Son Challenge so special, and I’m pleased to hear that PNC has extended its support of the event. This golf tournament means so much to all of us who are lucky enough to have the opportunity to play in this event.”

The tournament also holds three events in qualifier markets per year. This year they will be in Dallas, Chicago, and Philadelphia.

“The PNC Father/Son Challenge allows fans to see golf’s legends playing the game they love alongside those they love most,” said Alastair Johnston, vice chairman, IMG. “We are grateful for PNC’s ongoing support of this unique tournament and we look forward to returning to Orlando to celebrate golf and family for many years to come.”

Community support is a key aspect of the tournament and PNC’s sponsorship. PNC is committed to donating $150,000 annually to local non-profits over the life of its sponsorship. Across six previous years of title sponsorship, PNC has already donated $900,000 to Arnie’s Army Charitable Foundation and the Arnold Palmer Hospital for Children to support the “Healthy Families Orange” program. Over the years, PNC has also had the opportunity through this tournament to co-host events for local women in business, to put on clinics and provide free access to the tournament for active military, and even provide a service dog for a local veteran.

"PNC's long-standing sponsorship of the Father/Son Challenge reflects the philanthropic values we share with the PGA Tour and the golf community, as well as our focus on strong relationships,” said Bill Demchak, chairman, president and chief executive officer of The PNC Financial Services Group. “As PNC Bank continues to expand its footprint, the PNC Father/Son tournament helps us gain visibility with new audiences and to strengthen the relationships we enjoy today with more than 8 million retail, wealth, and corporate and institutional banking customers across the country.”

“NBC Sports is extremely proud of our heritage as co-founder for the Father/Son Challenge, one of golf’s most special events that closes out the calendar year on the golf schedule,” said Jon Miller, President, Programming, NBC Sports. “Our relationship with PNC Bank elevates this event each year as a must-attend and must-see event for players and fans alike, and we look forward to our continued relationship with PNC Bank for years to come.”

Past winners of the PNC Father/Son Challenge include some of the biggest names in golf including Raymond Floyd (1995, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2001), Jack Nicklaus (1999), Bernhard Langer (2005-06, 2014), Davis Love III (2012) and David Duval (2016).  Masters champion Angel Cabrera and his son, Angel Cabrera Jr. captured the 2017 title.

To qualify for the PNC Father/Son Challenge, participants must have won either a major championship or THE PLAYERS Championship in their career. The professional’s partner must not currently hold a Tour card, and while the majority of partners in the history of the event have been the sons of the golf legends, the family-themed tournament has seen daughters, grandsons and one father – Justin Leonard’s dad, Larry – participate over the years.

The PNC Father/Son Challenge is operated in partnership by IMG and NBC Sports.

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Fire damages National Golf Links of America clubhouse

By Will GrayApril 19, 2018, 12:55 pm

A fire broke out Wednesday at National Golf Links of America in Southampton, N.Y., causing "extensive damage" to a portion of the historic course's clubhouse.

According to a 27East.com report, an initial call was made to the Southampton police department about a fire on the roof of the clubhouse at 11:34 a.m. With the club's gates too narrow to fit a fire truck through, more than 100 firefighters from various departments helped douse the flames by transporting water up a hill to the east side of the clubhouse.

The fire was reportedly extinguished by 2:30 p.m., with no injuries requiring medical attention. According to a Golf Digest report, the club was undergoing construction on its outdoor eating area known as "the Birdcage" and that most of the club's historical documents reside on the opposite end of the clubhouse from where the fire broke out and was contained.

Opened in 1911, National Golf Links of America was designed by C.B. MacDonald and hosted the inaugural Walker Cup in 1922. The biennial matches returned in 2013 to NGLA, which is often rated among the top courses in the U.S. and sits adjacent to Shinnecock Hills, site of this summer's U.S. Open.