Notes Rain Not Yet a Factor

By Mercer BaggsJuly 16, 2003, 4:00 pm
SANDWICH, England -- The horns sounded just before 4:00 PM local time. Thunder had arrived and rain was on the way.
 
As expected, the heavens opened Wednesday, but only for a short while. The brief shower might have added a little moisture to a considerably firm and fast Royal St. Georges golf course, but certainly did not contribute enough to make a considerable difference.
 
Its going to need a pretty strong deluge to make this course play soft, said 1994 Open Champion Nick Price.
 
According to Tiger Woods, officials had watered the course over the first couple of practice days so that the course wouldnt get away from them.
 
When the Open was played 10 years ago at RSG, heavier Wednesday rains provided relief for the players once the tournament started. Such is not expected this time.
 
Though it may again rain Wednesday night and a little on Thursday, that's about all the course will receive.
 
Temperatures, which have hovered near 80 degrees over the first three days, are forecasted to drop into the mid-60s Thursday, steadily increasing to Sunday.
 
Even if we do get some rain between now and 6:30 tomorrow morning, that wont be enough to change the nature of the course as we see it now, said Royal & Ancient Secretary Peter Dawson.
 
And the forecast for the championship itself is pretty dry conditions. I think the course will get progressively quicker as the championship wears on.
 
GET A MOVE ON
 
Pace of play is always an issue in the Open Championship. There are 156 players in field, and with the wind and the difficult course conditions the time between shots increases.
 
In an effort to get play in under the sunlight, tournament officials have pushed up starting times on Thursday and Friday to 6:30 AM. They are also hoping that will pick up the pace of play.
 
It enables us to have starting intervals of 11 minutes rather than 10 minutes, said chairman of the R&As Championship Committee David Pepper. I think you will find on the average tour event you have a 10-minute interval, and that one extra minute certainly helps.'
 
If this does not help, and players fall behind their required positions, penalties will be enforced.
 
They have so many seconds in which to play the shot ' 40 seconds in some cases, 50 seconds in others. And if they have a bad time they are warned,' Pepper said.
 
And if they have a second bad time then they are penalized one shot. There are further sanctions, which eventually go as far as disqualification. But I dont think Ive ever come across a situation beyond one shot.
 
Since they do not employ split tees, the last tee time is at 4:06 PM, meaning every ounce of daylight will be needed to complete the first two rounds on time.
 
THE LANG AND SHORT OF IT
 
Bernhard Langer has never won the Open Championship, but he has had great success at Royal St. Georges.
 
He finished second in 1981, tied for third in 85 and finished solo third in 93. But he isnt expecting a similar result this week.
 
When I came here in 81, 85 and 93, I had had three tremendous years. I played extremely good golf throughout the whole year. My confidence was up and I cant say that now, said Langer, who has been playing through a major swing change.
 
The 45-year-old German may not be able to add to his 1985 and 93 Masters victories, but he hopes to make one more major move by taking the reigns as European Ryder Cup captain in 2004 at Oakland Hills.
 
Langer has long expressed his interest, and said Wednesday that he would focus fully on his captaincy, should he get the job, than try and be a player-captain.
 
Once you commit to be the captain they say you cant be captain and player, he said. So I guess after many months of thinking it through Ive committed to the captaincy and I will see who gets the job.
 
NOT-SO GREAT EXPECTATIONS
 
Kenny Perry has won three of his last four events, but, like Langer, he isnt expecting too much this week.
 
Its not my style of golf. Im not much in the wind and I dont hit it very low, he said. 'I hit it real high, and then run it up. But technology has changed. The golf ball flies straighter now, and it has helped me. I noticed yesterday it helped me a bunch. It made me feel a lot more comfortable.
 
The 42-year-old Kentuckian has competed in only one Open. He missed the cut in 1991 at Royal Birkdale.
 
BACK IN THE OPEN
 
Fred Couples wasnt sure if hed be able to make the cross-continental trip due to his chronic back problems.
 
This years Shell Houston Open champion pulled out of last weeks Barclays Scottish Open, but made his way to Royal St. Georges.
 
Got here and felt horrible (Tuesday), but had a back doctor (Tom Boers) here in town and I feel really good today, Couples said Wednesday. So Im going to see him tonight, tomorrow and hopefully be ready by Thursday.
 
Couples skipped last years Open. He has played only five times since he tied for ninth at this venue in 1993. He has eight top-10s in 14 career starts.
 
AS I SAY, NOT AS I DO
 
Colin Montgomerie will be trying to win his first major with the help of a belly putter ' a device he uses, but believes should be made illegal.
 
Its not fair, he said of the club. Three pivot points for us is not right. You should have two bodily parts touching the club at one point, at one time. And three shouldnt be allowed. But as long as it is allowed, Im using it.
 
Related Links:
  • 132nd Open Championship Home
  • More Open Championship News
  • Course Tour - The Royal St. George's Golf Club
  • Getty Images

    This time, Dad gets to enjoy Koepka's Father's Day win

    By Rex HoggardJune 18, 2018, 1:39 am

    SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – When Brooks Koepka won his first U.S. Open last year at Erin Hills the celebration was relatively subdued.

    His family didn’t attend the ’17 championship, but there was no way they were missing this year’s U.S. Open.

    “This year we booked something about five miles away [from Shinnecock Hills]," said Koepka’s father, Bob. "We weren’t going to miss it and I’m so glad we’re here.”

    The family was treated to a show, with Koepka closing with a 68 for a one-stroke victory to become the first player since Curtis Strange in 1989 to win back-to-back U.S. Opens.


    U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


    Koepka called his father early Sunday to wish him a happy Father’s Day, and Bob Koepka said he noticed a similar confidence in his son’s voice to the way he sounded when they spoke on Sunday of last year’s championship.

    There was also one other similarity.

    “Two years in a row, I haven't gotten him anything [for Father’s Day],” Brooks Koepka laughed. “Next year, I'm not going to get him anything either. It might bring some good luck.

    “It's incredible to have my family here, and my dad loves golf. To be here, he loves watching. To share it with him this time, it will be a little bit sweeter.”

    Getty Images

    Koepka reveals he injured his ribs last week

    By Rex HoggardJune 18, 2018, 1:19 am

    SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – There was a time when Brooks Koepka didn’t even know if he was going to be able to play this week’s U.S. Open as he recovered from a wrist injury that had sidelined him for 3 ½ months.

    He didn’t start hitting full shots until the Monday after the Masters, which he missed, and returned to the PGA Tour in late April at the Zurich Classic. His return to competitive form accelerated from there with a runner-up finish last month at the Forth Worth Invitational.

    But if Sunday’s victory at Shinnecock Hills, where he became the first player to win back-to-back U.S. Opens since Curtis Strange in 1989, appeared to be an official return to full strength, it wasn’t exactly that seamless.


    U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


    Koepka, who closed with a 68 for a one-stroke victory over Tommy Fleetwood, revealed that he suffered a rib injury last week at the FedEx St. Jude Classic.

    “My rib kind of came out last week. It bugged me a little bit,” he said. “Right when we got here, [Koepka’s trainer] worked on it, knew what it was. It was pretty sore, but I had no problems since then.”

    In 2015, Koepka withdrew from the Arnold Palmer Invitational with a similar rib injury.

    Getty Images

    In the battle of bros, Koepka 1-ups DJ

    By Rex HoggardJune 18, 2018, 1:12 am

    SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – It’s a scene that occurs on a regular basis at the Joey D Golf Training Center, frenzied workouts driven by an intense combination of competition and desire.

    Under the watchful eye of longtime PGA Tour trainer Joey Diovisalvi, Brooks Koepka and Dustin Johnson will turn even the most mundane elements of their workouts into winner-take-all contests – from the duo’s warmup on stationary bikes to the various exercises that have turned the twosome into a pair of the game’s most imposing figures.

    It was during one of these hyper-fueled sessions a few months ago when Koepka suggested he could become No. 1 world.

    “I think Brooks was 11th in the world at the time, and Dustin said, ‘Yeah, if you add a ‘1’ to that,’” Diovisalvi recalled. “Brooks said, ‘You wait and see; you want to come to my party and put the banner up?’ Dustin just laughed, ‘Not while I’m alive, it’s not happening.’”

    That rivalry, which is a friendly as it is genuine, was taken to a new level on Sunday at the U.S. Open when the duo set out for the final lap in the day’s penultimate group. Golf’s undisputed Bash Brothers going head-to-head after having traded titles at the last two U.S. Opens, the prototype of the modern professional playing on golf’s most demanding stage.

    To the New York masses, the twosome must have looked like the guy most likely to ask how long you’re going to be using the bench press at your local gym, a pair of golfing unicorns who have combined unrelenting power with wildly under-rated precision.


    U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


    With apologies to all those who set out for the final round at Shinnecock Hills with the greatest expectations, this was always going to come down to either Koepka or Johnson.

    Koepka won his first U.S. Open in dominant fashion last year at Erin Hills and Johnson got on the board in 2016 at Oakmont, so it should have been no surprise that, as the duo went through their normal “game day” workout early Sunday together, there was the unspoken realization that the day’s competition was just beginning.

    “[Koepka] likes to beat DJ,” said Claude Harmon III, the swing coach for both men. “We’re in an era now where it’s a great time in golf that all the guys are friends and there are great friendships, but trust me – all these guys want to win. Brooks wants to beat everybody, including DJ who is his closest friend out here. He wants to beat him in the gym, in everything they do.”

    Even in the Official World Golf Ranking, which currently features Johnson atop the pack?

    “Absolutely, he tells him all the time,” Harmon said.

    Koepka won’t climb to No. 1 in world on Monday, but he did one-up his South Florida stablemate by becoming the first player since Curtis Strange, in 1989, to win back-to-back U.S. Opens.

    It was a perfectly Koepka performance.

    A day that began with a no small measure of apprehension following Saturday’s inexplicable setup snafu – that prompted some players to contend that the USGA had “lost” the golf course for the second consecutive championship at Shinnecock Hills – quickly settled into the kind of competitive grind for which the U.S. Open is known.

    Koepka broke out of a four-way tie for first place with a 20-footer for birdie at the second, added another at the third to go two strokes clear and appeared to be on cruise control. But then U.S. Opens, real U.S. Opens where par is a good score and the USGA dances dangerously close to the edge, are never that easy.

    The first crack came at the par-3 11th hole when Koepka airmailed the green and needed to convert a 12-footer for bogey. He scrambled again at the 12th with a 6-footer for par and salvaged his advantage at the 14th hole after finding the fescue with his drive.

    With Tommy Fleetwood – who became the sixth player to shoot 63 in a U.S. Open to settle into the clubhouse lead at 2 over par – watching from the range, Koepka walked to the 72nd tee with a two-stroke advantage. There was no suspense, no moments of anxiety, no reason to think he would allow this opportunity to slip away.

    For all the complaints about Saturday’s setup, which even USGA CEO Mike Davis said were justified, this was the kind of U.S. Open Koepka relishes.

    “This week is just back to a typical U.S. Open, where 1 over par wins the golf tournament,” said Koepka, who closed with a 68. “It's just a lot of grinding. But I couldn't be happier with the way I played.”

    Picking your favorite major is often like picking your favorite child – they are all special in their unique way – but Koepka had no problem giving his second turn as U.S. Open champion its proper place.

    This was special. Special because he outplayed Johnson, who closed with a 70 to finish in third place at 3 over. Special because of the workmanlike performance Shinnecock Hills demanded. And special because the last year hasn’t exactly been a celebration.

    Toward the end of 2017, Koepka began to feel pain in his left wrist. He would miss the Masters with a partially torn tendon and spend 3 ½ maddening months on his couch recovering.

    “We were worried that he wasn’t even going to be able to come here and defend,” said Koepka’s father, Bob. “I’m just thankful that he’s been able to recover. It’s been a long three months for him.”

    Although he didn’t start hitting full shots until the Monday after the Masters, his return to competitive form was nothing short of meteoric, even by modern standards. And when he finished runner-up at last month’s Fort Worth Invitational, just his fourth event back, his confidence quickly returned.

    “He’d never really been a golf nerd and I think he fell in love with golf again,” Harmon said. “When he came back there was something I hadn’t seen with him wanting to play again. He watched the Masters. He never watches the Masters.”

    He also was back in the gym, alongside Johnson, rekindling the duo’s ongoing bout of one-upmanship. Early Sunday during their pre-round workout it was the status quo for Koepka and Johnson, friendly banter that both lightens the mood and inspires excellence.

    But it was different once the two set out for the final round. There were no jokes, no trash talking, no talking of any kind, in fact.

    “I love Dustin. He's one of my best friends,” Koepka said. “To play alongside him, it was fun today. I was excited about it. I figured he would be the guy to beat. But I didn't talk to him today. Maybe I said something on [No.] 3, and that was about it.”

    There will be plenty to talk about next week when they renew what is one of the game’s most unique friendships and rivalries. Koepka won’t ascend to No. 1 in the world just yet, but he will hang a banner in Diovisalvi’s gym – 2018 U.S. Open champion – and Johnson wouldn’t miss that moment.

    Getty Images

    Balky putter dooms DJ's run for second U.S. Open

    By Will GrayJune 18, 2018, 12:31 am

    SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – While the course conditions during the final round of the U.S. Open were decidedly different than the day before, Dustin Johnson’s struggles on the greens remained the same.

    Johnson appeared in command of the tournament at the halfway point at Shinnecock Hills, building a four-shot lead as the only player under par. But he, like many of the leaders, fell victim to borderline third-round conditions and struggled to a 7-over 77.

    That still left him with a share of the lead at 3 over heading into the final round and a great chance to earn his second U.S. Open title in the last three years. Instead, he couldn’t keep pace with playing partner Brooks Koepka, shooting an even-par 70 to finish alone in third while Koepka went two shots better to successfully defend his title.


    U.S. Open: Scores | Live blog | Full coverage


    Johnson declined to speak with media following his round.

    Johnson was 2 over for the week heading to the back nine on Sunday, only one shot behind Koepka. But he made three bogeys on the inward half, including dropped shots on Nos. 11 and 14 that effectively ended his title chances.

    The culprit for Johnson’s regression was clear. After leading the field in strokes gained: putting through the first two rounds, he couldn’t get comfortable on the greens on the weekend.

    Johnson needed 38 putts to complete his third round, T-64 among the 67 players who made the cut, and his 35 final-round putts were T-63 in the same category.

    Despite the putting woes, Johnson has now finished T-4 or better at the U.S. Open four times in the last five years. In addition to his third-place showing this week and his win at Oakmont in 2016, he also tied for second at Chambers Bay in 2015 and was T-4 at Pinehurst the year prior.