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Oh-K: How and why Ko turned to new coach

By Randall MellFebruary 14, 2018, 7:00 pm

Lydia Ko didn’t go with any of the biggest names in coaching in the latest revamp of her team.

While Ted Oh’s name should be familiar to golf fans, he isn’t a top 100 teacher.

A former rival to Tiger Woods in the junior ranks, he is a relative newcomer to the coaching ranks, though he is proving more than a quick study.

Ko quietly left Gary Gilchrist in January to enlist Oh’s help in getting ready for her first start of 2018, which she’s making this week at the ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open. She was with David Leadbetter before Gilchrist. They’re two of the biggest names in coaching.

So why Oh?

Ko hasn’t addressed that just yet. Her camp appears to be trying to low-key her start to 2018, after all the scrutiny she received making sweeping changes going into last year, which ended as her first winless year since she began playing LPGA events as a 15-year-old.



Her changes, however, got the attention of New Zealand’s own Bob Charles, who counts The Open in 1963 among his six PGA Tour titles. He told New Zealand’s Fairfax Media Wednesday that he was puzzled by all the changes she has made to her game the last two years.

“It doesn’t thrill me at all,” Charles said. “Perhaps it thrills her to be chopping and changing. I’m from the old school. You figure it out yourself. You go with what you’ve got and not somebody else.”

It might hearten Charles to know that Oh considers himself old school, too.

Oh, 41, told GolfChannel.com that he didn’t overhaul Ko’s swing in their work getting ready for this season.

“Her mechanics were already great,” Oh said. “It was more fine-tuning things. It was more about sequence, tempo and balance and a lot of practice.

“We worked a lot on her scoring clubs, her short irons and wedges and shots around the green. We spent hours and hours with the scoring clubs.”

Ko was second in LPGA scoring average in 2015 and ’16. She dropped to 10th last year.

So what led Ko to Oh?

Michael Yim is the common denominator. Yim is Ko’s agent. He was also the first agent Oh ever worked with, when Oh turned pro coming out of UNLV.

Oh was a teen sensation, growing up in the same “golf neighborhood” as Woods in Southern California. Woods was from Cypress, Oh from Long Beach. Woods and Oh were 1-2 atop in the U.S. junior ranks for a spell.

Back in 1993, Oh burst into the national spotlight, qualifying for the U.S. Open at Baltusrol. He was 16. That made him the youngest player in more than 50 years to qualify for that major. His locker that week was right next to Jack Nicklaus and Greg Norman. He played a practice round with Seve Ballesteros.


Ted Oh during the 1993 U.S. Open at Baltusrol (Getty Images)


Ultimately, Oh never broke through to make it to the PGA Tour. He played the Web.com Tour for three years late in the ‘90s, back when it was called the Nike Tour. He eventually made his way to the Asian Tour, the Korean PGA Tour and Japan Golf Tour, where he carved out a good living for his family there. He played overseas until late in 2016, when a bad elbow and knee led him to start searching for another way to make a living.

“I came back to the States, and I didn’t know what I wanted to do,” Oh said. “A coaching job came out of nowhere.”

Oh adapted quickly when an offer came.

Born in Korea, Oh moved to the United States when he was 7. But his overseas ties, with all his Asian playing experience, led him back over there for his first meaningful tour-level coaching experience.

Oh was recruited to help Ha Na Jang on the LPGA’s fall Asian swing late in 2016. Jang won the Fubon Taiwan Championship the second week he was out with her.

Today, Oh works out of Indian Palms Country Club in Indio, Calif. He’s overseeing an Asian golf camp there this week.

Oh got a call from Ko’s camp late last year to see if he would be a “second set of eyes” for Ko in Phoenix, where she decided to do her offseason training, near the PXG headquarters. Apparently, they made a strong connection, because Oh ended up staying five weeks, devoting himself full time to helping Ko in boot-camp-style preparation for the new season. He said they worked nine-hour days together, five days a week.

“The days would have been longer, but the sun went down,” Oh said.

Oh’s old-school style is based on work, feeling shots in lots and lots of practice. It’s something that likely resonated with Ko, who impressed Gilchrist with her work ethic and commitment to long hours of practice.

Oh wasn’t just coaching Ko. He was playing and practicing with her. If she was in the bunker hitting shots, he was in the bunker hitting shots.

“I told Lydia I’m very old school, nothing fancy,” Oh said. “I said only about 25 percent of my job will be drawing lines on video and that sort of thing, that 75 percent would be about the practice.

“I told her ‘I’m not going to tell you how to practice, I’m going to be with you.’”

That’s how Oh believes a player develops the feel for shots.

Ko will be looking to develop that feel into a bounce back year.

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Watch: Full replays of The Open coverage

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 22, 2018, 11:00 am

NBC Sports and Golf Channel are showcasing nearly 50 hours of live coverage of the 147th Open. Missed anything? Well, you can catch up right here. Click on the links below for replays from Carnoustie, broken down into daily segments:

Saturday, Day 3 (Times ET)

7AM-3PM (Watch): Jordan Spieth fired 65 to move into a three-way share of the 54-hole lead, while Tiger Woods (66) played his way into contention. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Rickie Fowler and Thorbjorn Olesen.

4:30-7AM (Watch): Sunny skies and birdies were on the menu early in Round 3, as Justin Rose made his way around Carnoustie in 64 strokes. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Henrik Stenson and Bryson DeChambeau.


Friday, Day 2 (Times ET)

8:20AM-3PM (Watch): As the skies cleared on Friday afternoon, defending champion Jordan Spieth made a run to try and regain the claret jug. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Jordan Spieth, Justin Rose and Kiradech Aphibarnrat.

1:30-8:20AM (Watch): On a rainy Friday morning at Carnoustie, Rory McIlroy shot 69 to reach 4 under, while Zach Johnson fired a 67 for the early lead. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Brooks Koepka, Ian Poulter and Cameron Smith.


Thursday, Day 1 (Times ET)

Noon-4PM (Watch): Tiger Woods was up and down in the afternoon, as winds picked up a little and no one could catch Kevin Kisner. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Woods, Russell Knox and Hideki Matsuyama.

1:30-8:25AM (Watch): Defending champion Jordan Spieth got off to a good start, while Kevin Kisner (66) set the early pace. Click here or on the image below to watch. Also, click here to watch the full replay of the marquee group: Rickie Fowler, Jon Rahm and Chris Wood.

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How to watch The Open on TV and online

By Golf Channel DigitalJuly 22, 2018, 8:30 am

You want to watch the 147th Open? Here’s how you can do it.

Golf Channel and NBC Sports will be televising 182 hours of overall programming from the men's third major of the year at Carnoustie

In addition to the traditional coverage, the two networks will showcase three live alternate feeds: marquee groups, featured holes (our new 3-hole channel) and spotlight action. You can also watch replays of full-day coverage, Thursday-Sunday, in the Golf Channel app, NBC Sports apps, and on GolfChannel.com.  

Here’s the weekly TV schedule, with live stream links in parentheses. You can view all the action on the Golf Channel mobile, as well. Alternate coverage is noted in italics:

(All times Eastern; GC=Golf Channel; NBC=NBC Sports; GC.com=GolfChannel.com or check the GLE app)

Monday, July 16

GC: 7-9AM: Morning Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: 9-11AM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)

GC: 7-9PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Tuesday, July 17

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Wednesday, July 18

GC: 6AM-2PM: Live From The Open (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Thursday, July 19

GC: Midnight-1:30AM: Midnight Drive (stream.golfchannel.com)

GC: Day 1: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 1: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Friday, July 20

GC: Day 2: The Open, live coverage: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Spotlight: 1:30AM-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, Marquee Groups: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 2: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 4AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 4-5PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Saturday, July 21

GC: Day 3: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 3: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 3: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-3PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 3-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)


Sunday, July 22

GC: Day 4: The Open, live coverage: 4:30-7AM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

NBC: Rd. 4: The Open, live coverage: 7AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/theopen)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Spotlight: 4:30AM-2:30PM (www.golfchannel.com/spotlight)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, Marquee Groups: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/marqueegroup)

GC.com: Day 4: The Open, 3-Hole Channel: 5AM-2PM (www.golfchannel.com/3holechannel)

GC: Live From The Open: 2:30-4PM (www.golfchannel.com/livefromstream)

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Tiger Tracker: 147th Open Championship

By Tiger TrackerJuly 22, 2018, 8:30 am

Tiger Woods begins the final round of the 147th Open Championship four shots off the lead. He's out at 9:25 a.m. ET on Sunday and we're tracking him.


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Schauffele just fine being the underdog

By Rex HoggardJuly 21, 2018, 8:06 pm

CARNOUSTIE, Scotland – Following a breakthough season during which he won twice and collected the PGA Tour Rookie of the Year Award, Xander Schauffele concedes his sophomore campaign has been less than stellar, but that could all change on Sunday at The Open.

Schauffele followed a second-round 66 with a 67 on Saturday to take a share of the 9-under-par lead with Jordan Spieth and Kevin Kisner.

Although he hasn’t won in 2018, he did finish runner-up at The Players and tied for sixth at the U.S. Open, two of the year’s toughest tests.


Full-field scores from the 147th Open Championship

Full coverage of the 147th Open Championship


“Growing up, I always hit it well and played well in tough conditions,” Schauffele said. “I wasn't the guy to shoot 61. I was the guy to shoot like 70 when it was playing really hard.”

Sunday’s pairing could make things even more challenging when he’ll head out in the day’s final tee time with Spieth, the defending champion. But being the underdog in a pairing, like he was on Saturday alongside Rory McIlroy, is not a problem.

“All the guys I've talked to said, 'Live it up while you can, fly under the radar,'” he said. “Today I played in front of what you call Rory's crowd and guys were just yelling all the time, even while he's trying to putt, and he had to step off a few times. No one was yelling at me while I was putting. So I kind of enjoy just hanging back and relaxing.”