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Piller leads excited, curious LPGA friends into motherhood

By Randall MellJanuary 11, 2018, 10:20 pm

Gerina Piller’s new “bump” got a lot of attention from a group of major champions who huddled around her Monday during the Morgan & Friends Fight Cancer event in Boca Raton, Fla.

Morgan Pressel, Brittany Lincicome and Paula Creamer were more than excited for Piller, who is 23 weeks pregnant. They were also curious.

“I told Gerina, `Write down everything I’ll need to know,’” Pressel said. “I told her to take notes.”

Pressel wasn’t kidding. She yearns to be a mom someday soon.

“It’s definitely something my husband and I are talking about a lot,” Pressel said. “It’s something we will pursue, hopefully soon.”

It seems like yesterday Piller and Pressel’s generation of American women were hitting the tour in force. Piller is 32 now, and Pressel will be 30 this spring. Creamer is 31 and Lincicome 32.

They became friends as juniors and while growing up on tour. They’re all married now, and they’re reaching that age together when thoughts of starting a family are becoming more important to them.



“I think once one of us gets it started, there’s going to be a ripple effect, with many kids coming at the same time,” Lincicome said when they all got together at Pressel’s charity event last year. “We’ve gone through junior golf together, professional golf together, weddings together, and one day I can see our kids together.”

There was a time not so long ago when the LPGA was filled with working moms, when the tour’s Smuckers-sponsored traveling daycare center bustled with children. It has shrunk considerably, so much so that Karine Icher’s two children are sometimes the only ones there during a tournament week.

The tour is so much younger now than it’s ever been. When Creamer turned 30 in 2016, the average age of an LPGA winner was just 22.3 years old. It helps explain why the traveling daycare center isn’t bustling anymore, but that might be changing in the not so distant future, if Piller really has started something.

“I feel like there’s going to be an influx,” Pressel said. “I know a quite a few ladies on tour would like to start families in the next few years, and hopefully we’ll all have children in daycare together. That would be fun.”

Piller will get to show off her “bump” Friday at the Diamond Resorts Invitational at Four Seasons Resort Orlando. It will be the first and only tournament start this year. She and husband Martin Piller, a PGA Tour pro, are expecting a boy on May 3.

While Piller plans to take the rest of the year off, her fans shouldn’t worry. She is determined to return to the LPGA next year with her status intact, thanks to the tour’s maternity policy.

“It’s always been a dream of mine to be a mom,” Piller said. “But with Martin’s schedule and our lifestyle, it’s been hard to plan, but we’re blessed and excited for this time now in our lives.”

Piller, Pressel, Creamer and Lincicome don’t have to look far though to see evidence that there’s life on tour after motherhood. Juli Inkster won 18 times, four of them major championships, after giving birth to the first of her two daughters. Catriona Matthew won the Ricoh Women’s British Open when she was 39, 11 weeks after giving birth to her second daughter. Cristie Kerr, who became a mother 4 years ago with the help of a surrogate after she was diagnosed with endometrial deficiency, won after turning 40 last year.

Piller is especially close to Inkster.

“Juli is a huge role model for me, not just on the golf course, but off the course,” Piller said. “She has always stressed to me how family comes first, and how golf is always going to be there. She loves her girls and wouldn’t trade being a mom for the world. That’s very encouraging.”



Amanda Blumenherst, the 2008 U.S. Women’s Amateur champ, actually got this baby deal going among her generation of American LPGA pros. She left the tour four years ago and now has a 3-year-old son and 1-year-old daughter.

While Blumenherst entertained thoughts of returning to golf, she says her work as a Golf Channel analyst has satisfied her desire to remain involved in the game.

“I did think I was just hitting a pause button, as opposed to a retirement button,” Blumenherst said. “I thought we would start a family and then re-evaluate after having a few kiddos, but it really was a difficult decision to try to come back.

“I would have loved an LPGA win, or a hand full of them, or to make the Solheim Cup team. So that was a challenge, having goals I hadn’t met yet, but at the same time I knew having a family was very important to me.”

Blumenherst said she has gained a special admiration for women who continued to compete as moms.

“I had so much respect for Juli Inkster, Nancy Lopez and Danah Bordner before I had children, and now I have hero worship for them,” Blumenherst said. “I don’t know how they did it.

“Being a parent is a full-time job, and to see them balance both so well, it’s a super human feat. I don’t know if I could do it . . . It’s hard to be away from your children, to leave them for long chunks in a day or even to fly away to Asia and Europe and not take them with you. I admire the moms who do it.”

These are the challenges awaiting Piller, who knows she has a special group of friends who will want to see her notes when they follow her into motherhood someday soon.

“I look at what Catriona and Juli did, and I have hope I can come back just as good or even better,” Piller said. “If that’s not the case, I’ll have a pretty good reason why it wasn’t. Martin and I feel blessed and excited about what’s ahead.”

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'Go in'? Yes, JT wants an ace at the par-4 14th

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 19, 2018, 5:11 am

Justin Thomas didn’t hesitate after hitting his tee shot on the 353-yard, par-4 14th in Round 2 of the CJ Cup.

“Go in,” he immediately said.

“Please go in,” he added.



Thomas’ tee shot was on a great line, but it landed just short of the green. Surprisingly, it took three more shots for his ball to "go in." After birdies on Nos. 12 and 13, Thomas parred the 14th.

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Watch: Dufner makes six (!) fist pumps after birdie

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 19, 2018, 4:53 am

Jason Dufner makes Ben Stein seem like Jonathan Winters. Dufner often looks mighty miserable for someone who plays golf for a living.

But not on Friday at the CJ Cup!

Dufner made a 20-footer for birdie at the 16th hole and “celebrated” with one-two-three-(pause)-four-five-six fist pumps. There could have been more, but the camera cut away.



That was Dufner’s third birdie on the back nine, which offset a triple bogey at the par-3 seventh, en route to an even-par 72. Good times.

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Watch: Paul C-ace-y makes hole-in-one at CJ Cup

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 19, 2018, 2:35 am

Par-par-par-par-par-par. It was a boring second round over the first six holes for Paul Casey at the CJ Cup.

And then he aced the par-3 seventh.



Casey's tee shot from 176 tracked straight towards the hole and rolled in near the final revolution. That got him to 2 under par for the tournament. He was five off the lead, held by Chez Reavie, but bogeyed the ninth and 10th holes to give back those two strokes.

Hey, it's a no-cut event and a guaranteed paycheck. Drinks on Casey!

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Wie has hand surgery, out for rest of 2018

By Randall MellOctober 18, 2018, 9:43 pm

Michelle Wie will miss the rest of this season after undergoing surgery Thursday to fix injuries that have plagued her right hand in the second half of this year.

Wie announced in an Instagram post that three ailments have been causing the pain in her hand: an avulsion fracture, bone spurs and nerve entrapment.

An avulsion fracture is an injury to the bone where it attaches to a ligament or tendon.

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I think John Mayer once said, “Someday, everything will make perfect sense. So for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears, be strong and keep reminding yourself that everything happens for a reason.” A lot of people have been asking me what’s been going on with my hand and I haven’t shared much, because I wasn’t sure what was going on myself. After countless MRI’s, X-rays, CT scans, and doctor consultations, I was diagnosed with having a small Avulsion Fracture, bone spurring, and nerve entrapment in my right hand. After 3 cortisone injections and some rest following the British Open, we were hoping it was going to be enough to grind through the rest of the season, but it just wasn’t enough to get me through. So I made the decision after Hana Bank to withdraw from the rest of the season, come back to the states, and get surgery to fix these issues. It’s been disheartening dealing with pain in my hand all year but hopefully I am finally on the path to being and STAYING pain free! Happy to announce that surgery was a success today and I cannot wait to start my rehab so that I can come back stronger and healthier than ever. Huge thank you to Dr. Weiland’s team at HSS for taking great care of me throughout this process and to all my fans for your unwavering support. It truly means the world to me. I’ll be back soon guys!!!! Promise

A post shared by Michelle Wie (@themichellewie) on

Dr. Andrew Weiland, an attending orthopedic surgeon at the Hospital for Special Surgery in New York, performed the procedure.

“It’s been disheartening dealing with pain in my hand all year, but, hopefully, I am finally on the path to being and staying pain free,” Wie wrote.

Wie withdrew during the first round of the Ricoh Women’s British Open with the hand injury on Aug. 2 and didn’t play again until teeing it up at the UL International Crown two weeks ago and the KEB Hana Bank Championship last week. She played those events with what she hoped was a new “pain-free swing,” one modeled after Steve Stricker, with more passive hands and wrists. She went 1-3 at the UL Crown and tied for 59th in the limited field Hana Bank.

“After 3 cortisone injections and some rest following the British Open, we were hoping it was going to be enough to grind through the rest of the season, but it just wasn’t enough to get me through,” she wrote.


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Wie, who just turned 29 last week, started the year saying her top goal was to try to stay injury free. She won the HSBC Women’s World Championship in March, but her goal seemed doomed with a diagnosis of arthritis in both wrists before the year even started.

Over the last few years, Wie has dealt with neck, back, hip, knee and ankle injuries. Plus, there was an emergency appendectomy that knocked her out of action for more than a month late last season. Her wrists have been an issue going back to early in her career.

“I don’t think there is one joint or bone in her body that hasn’t had some sort of injury or issue,” Wie’s long-time swing coach, David Leadbetter, said earlier this year.