Getty Images

Ready for the big reveal at Shinnecock

By Rex HoggardJune 13, 2018, 6:07 pm

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. – It’s a bomber’s golf course. It’s a second-shot layout. The fairways are wide, greens firm. There’s a short list of would-be winners; parity has made this a wide-open Open.

This Shinnecock Hills Open, the fifth played on the east-end jewel, is a litany of questions without answers.

If history is any indication, the 118th edition will be something closer to what we expect from America’s national championship. This has all the markings of being your father’s Open – tough pars, tall rough and attrition.

In 2004, the last time the U.S. Open made it this far up the Long Island Expressway, the winning score was 4 under par, and in ’95 Corey Pavin played in a perfect U.S. Open manner on his way to an even-par victory.

This week’s championship may promise to be something more familiar – something more punitive – than the last few experiments, but it doesn’t clearly identify a favorite.

Fresh off his dominant performance last week in Memphis, Dustin Johnson has gotten the nod from Las Vegas, starting the week as the betting favorite for all the right reasons. But that nod ignores the current competitive landscape.

According to world ranking math, six players could be ranked No. 1 on Monday – Johnson (the current No. 1), Justin Thomas, Justin Rose, Jordan Spieth, Jon Rahm and Rory McIlroy – depending on how things play out over the next four days.


U.S. Open: Tee times | Full coverage


To put that in context, when the U.S. Open was last played at Shinnecock Hills in ’04, Tiger Woods was No. 1 and would remain there, unchallenged for the next four months.

In ’04, the gap between the first- and second-ranked players (Woods and Ernie Els, respectively) was 1.91 average ranking points; and the gulf between Woods and the sixth-ranked player (Mike Weir) was 6.24 average ranking points.

Johnson’s current lead over No. 2 Thomas is a razor-thin .29 average ranking points; and DJ’s advantage over No. 6 McIlroy is just 2.22 points.

Rarely in golf can parity be so clearly quantified, and rarely has the competitive congestion led to a collective confidence.

“The only reason I'm here is to win. If I wasn't, I wouldn't have signed up,” said Brooks Koepka, last year’s champion. “I think everyone here is trying to win. Everyone thinks they're going to win, and they should. When you come to a golf tournament, you're preparing to win. You're not going to be satisfied with second place. I don't think I've ever heard anybody say, ‘Man, I'm glad I finished second.’”

The list of potential champions goes as deep into the tee sheet as one’s imagination. But what kind of test awaits this week’s field?

The 2004 championship at Shinnecock Hills is widely considered a bust in terms of set up for the USGA. A golf course that was already on the edge tumbled into the unplayable abyss on Sunday when even well-played tee shots on the par-3 seventh hole began bounding hopelessly into one bad spot after another.

“It's a very difficult job to find the line of testing the best players to the greatest degree and then making it carnival golf,” said Phil Mickelson, runner-up at Shinnecock Hills in ’04 who might be the week’s most compelling story line with the career Grand Slam hanging in the balance. “It's a very fine line, and it's not a job I would want. And I know that the USGA is doing the best they can to find that line, and a lot of times they do, and sometimes they cross over it.”

Following what some considered Open Light last year at Erin Hills – where Koepka won at 16 under – and in 2015 at Chambers Bay, many envisioned this championship a perfect pathway back to something more familiar. Golf’s toughest test, as the U.S. Open is considered in most circles, had become a bit too user friendly.

Shinnecock Hills is a classic design with all the central elements of a demanding test, from aches of knee-high fescue rough to wildly pitched greens that leave little, if any, room for error.

“I'm obviously not that old, but when I watched U.S. Opens on TV and saw these long, narrow corridors of narrow fairways and thick rough, that's what I was used to at a U.S. Open,” McIlroy said. “If you look at the venues that are coming up, they're very traditional venues, venues like Oakmont, Winged Foot, Pebble Beach. Maybe you'll see more of what we perceive as a traditional U.S. Open setup.”

Shinnecock Hills certainly fits into the notion that the USGA is gravitating back toward something closer to the association’s original DNA, but if this week’s championship is a chance to put some teeth back into the game’s toughest test the appetite for that kind of pendulum swing seems to be lacking.

Mike Davis, the association’s executive director, has been outspoken on this front. There will not be a sequel to the fiasco that defined the ’04 U.S. Open this week. Technology will help, with the USGA no longer relying on the inexact science of a Stimpmeter to measure firmness, and the USGA’s modus operandi under Davis has been to err on the side of the player, not protecting par.

 “I've never, since I've been at the USGA and it's been almost 30 years, heard anybody say we're shooting for even par. Never heard it. I know people think we talk about it, but it's never happened,” Davis said. “But we talk about incessantly how do we get the course to be really a great test of golf? As we say, get all 14 clubs dirty.”

What that means for this week’s field is anyone’s guess, but then that seems to be the status quo at a U.S. Open with more questions than answers.

Watch: Koepka holes out from off the green at 16

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 21, 2018, 5:36 am

Brooks Koepka faced a stiff challenge from Gary Woodland on Sunday in South Korea, but eventually it came time to end the suspense.

Having clung to a slim lead for much of the back nine, Koepka looked as though he was going to have to scramble just to save par when he missed the green at 16. 

Instead, caddie Ricky Elliott was able to leave Koepka's putter in the bag.

That holeout combined with a bogey from Woodland at 17 put Koepka ahead by three, allowing him to walk to victory and to the top of the world rankings.

Getty Images

Koepka wins CJ Cup, ascends to world No. 1

By Nick MentaOctober 21, 2018, 5:07 am

Brooks Koepka eagled the 72nd hole Sunday to cap off a final-round 64, win the CJ Cup and supplant Dustin Johnson as the new No. 1 in the Official World Golf Ranking. Here's how Koepka took over the golf world Sunday in South Korea.

Leaderboard: Koepka (-21), Gary Woodland (-17), Ryan Palmer (-15), Rafa Cabrera Bello (-15), Jason Day (-12), Scott Piercy (-12)

What it means: This is Koepka's fifth career PGA Tour victory but only his second in a non-major, following his maiden win back at the 2015 Waste Management Phoenix Open. Up four to start the day, Koepka saw his lead evaporate as Woodland rocketed up the leaderboard and kept pace with him for much of the back nine. But every time Sunday's result appeared in doubt, Koepka reclaimed his lead in dramatic fashion. He nearly aced the par-3 13th to go ahead by two and later holed out for birdie at the par-4 16th to go up three with two to play. He finished par-eagle at 17 and 18 to shoot a back-nine 29 and close out his third victory in the last five months. With the win, Koepka ascends to the No. 1 spot in the Official World Golf Ranking for the first time in his career.

Round of the day: Ryan Palmer set a Nine Bridges course record when he birdied his final seven holes in a row en route to a bogey-free round of 10-under 62 and a solo third-place finish.

Best of the rest: Woodland played his first 16 holes in 9 under par to storm from five back and catch Koepka atop the leaderboard. But his furious Sunday charge finally came to an end when he failed to get up and down for par from the back bunker at 17. He carded his 11th birdie of the round at the 18th hole to sign for 63 and finish solo second.

Biggest disappointment: In retrospect, Woodland called it correctly on Saturday when he said: "You obviously want to get off to a good start and put pressure on him as soon as you can. You know, Brooks doesn't seem like he cares too much, and he's playing so good, so you're going to have to go out and post a number." Woodland put as much pressure on Koepka as he could. He went out and posted that number. Koepka never blinked.

Shot of the day: Koepka's holeout at the par-3 16th, which put him ahead by three, unofficially ending the proceedings:

Quote of the day: "To be world No. 1 is something I dreamed of as a kid. I don't think this one is going to sink in." - Koepka

Getty Images

Watch: Koepka nearly aces par-3 13th Sunday

By Golf Channel DigitalOctober 21, 2018, 4:24 am

Just when it looked like he was facing a legitimate challenge Sunday, Brooks Koepka responded with a near-ace.

Up four to start the final round, Koepka saw his lead disappear as Gary Woodland raced up the leaderboard to tie him at 13 under and then 14 under.

Unfazed, the three-time major winner birdied the par-5 12th to regain his outright lead and then followed up with this tee shot at the 218-yard, par-3 13th.

And just like that, the tap-in birdie put Koepka back ahead by two with five to play.

Getty Images

Haas nearly shoots age in taking Champions playoff opener lead

By Associated PressOctober 20, 2018, 10:05 pm

RICHMOND, Va.  -- Jay Haas shot a 7-under 65 - missing his age by a stroke - to take a two-shot lead Saturday in the PGA Tour Champions' playoff-opening Dominion Energy Charity Classic.

Trying to become the oldest winner in tour history, the 64-year-old Haas birdied the par-5 16th and 18th holes to get to 11-under 133 on The Country Club of Virginia's James River Course.

''I've been out here too long to know that I can learn to expect anything,'' Haas said. ''While I'm hopeful every day and I've been playing OK, the last couple weeks have not been very good, but this week has been much better. I love this golf course and it looks good to my eye. Most of the holes look like I'm going to hit a good shot, so I enjoy playing here.''

Mike Fetchick set the age record of 63 years to the day in the 1985 Hilton Head event. Haas is second on the list, taking the 2016 Toshiba Classic at 62 years, 10 months, 7 days for his 18th senior title.

''That's a good way to say I'm old, 'experience,''' Haas said. ''I think I'm very nervous most of the time when I play and today was no exception, but I continued to hit good shots and, hopefully, I can put one foot in front of the other, one shot at a time, do what I tell my son to do every time, you know? See if I can put some of those adages to work tomorrow.''


Full-field scores from the Dominion Energy Charity Classic


Stephen Ames and Scott Dunlap were tied for second after the round that started in light rain. Ames had a 67, and Dunlap shot 68.

Defending champion Bernhard Langer had a 66 to join Billy Mayfair (67) and Woody Austin (68) at 9 under. Langer won the SAS Championship last week in North Carolina to take the season points lead. The 61-year-old German star has two victories this year and 38 overall on the 50-and-over tour.

The top 72 players qualified for the Charles Schwab Cup Playoffs opener. The top 54 on Sunday will get spots next week in the Invesco QQQ Championship in Thousand Oaks, California, and the top 36 after that will advance to the season-ending Charles Schwab Cup Championship in Phoenix.

Miguel Angel Jimenez, second in the standings, was tied for 23rd at 4 under after a 71.