Skip to main content

Woods finishes firmly on top of 2000 World Golf Ranking

Tiger Woods finished the 2000 season nearly 18 points ahead of his nearest competitor, as the final Official World Golf Rankings were unveiled on Monday.
 
Woods, who became the youngest player and only the fifth golfer in history to complete the career Grand Slam with victories in the U.S. and British Opens this past summer, posted a point average of 29.40 compared with 11.69 for second-ranked Ernie Els of South Africa.
 
The 24-year-old Woods enjoyed one of the greatest seasons in golf history, amassing a total of 10 wins in 22 official starts. He added a third major title to his 2000 trophy case when he successfully defended his PGA Championship crown in August, and his win at the Canadian Open less than a month later saw him become just the second player to win the three national opens in a single season.
 
Woods was also dominant in the World Golf Championship events, teaming up with the world's third-ranked player, David Duval, to retain the World Cup for the U.S. He also cruised to victory at the WGC-NEC Invitational, finished second in the WGC-Match Play after falling to Darren Clarke in the final match, and tied for fifth place at the WGC-American Express Championship.
 
Woods' other triumphs included the Mercedes Championships, the Pebble Beach Pro-Am, the Bay Hill Invitational, the Memorial Tournament and the Johnnie Walker Classic last month in Thailand. He also recorded 19 top-five finishes this year.
 
Els, who began the year with a playoff loss to Woods in the season-opening Mercedes event, went on to finish second at The Masters, U.S. Open and British Open. He was also the runner-up at the Memorial and took third place at the Tour Championship.

Els registered his lone PGA Tour win at the International in August and added a European Tour victory at Loch Lomond and a South African title in Sun City.
 
Duval, who yielded the top-ranking to Woods over a year ago, captured his first victory in a year in a half at the Buick Challenge in October. He is followed by fourth-ranked Phil Mickelson, whose four titles in 2000 matched his best year of 1996 and put him in second place behind Woods on the PGA Tour season money list.
 

England's Lee Westwood, the winner of five European Tour titles as well as the Cisco World Match Play Championship and a South African event, finished in fifth place, one spot ahead Scotland's Colin Montgomerie. Westwood won the Order of Merit for the first time, putting an end to Montgomerie's seven-year reign as Europe's top money earner.
 
Davis Love III, whose victory at the unofficial Williams World Challenge earlier this month was his first win of any kind in over two and a half years, stands in seventh place, one slot better than Hal Sutton, who won twice in 2000.
 
Fiji's Vijay Singh slipped two spots over the course of the year to ninth place despite winning The Masters, while Phoenix Open champ Tom Lehman rounded out the top-10.
 
The biggest movers of 2000 were Michael Campbell of New Zealand (108th to 14th); Canada's Mike Weir (57th to 21st); Americans Franklin Langham (181st to 59th) and Chris DiMarco (161st to 66th); and Japan's Nobuhito Sato (261st to 81st).