Scotland, Bandon Dunes linked halfway in an unlikely golf destination: Cape Breton, Nova Scotia

By Brandon TuckerJuly 23, 2012, 3:44 pm

INVERNESS, Nova Scotia – Between the winding, coastal roads and ferry rides across lochs, the abundant seafood and even the accents of the islanders, a visit to Cape Breton evokes a charm with the familiarity of the British Isles.

But rather than menus offering fish 'n' chips or haggis, this isle's shoreline comes stocked with lobster. Visitors can enjoy traditional lobster suppers boiled in sea salt, spoonfuls of lobster chowder appetizers or even lobster with eggs at breakfast. You could probably even garnish a martini with a lobster claw. 

The town of Inverness, home to the new Cabot Links, is the same name as the Scottish Highlands largest city, a direct result of an influx of Highlanders settling here in the 1800s. Today, the town is even home to a single malt whisky distillery and inn, Glenora Distillery. For a first-time American to the isle, the accents of the locals on the eastern edge of Canada is surprising; their tongues are more Scottish compared to the Canadianspeak you'd find around Ontario.

Golf courses and residents here are few and far between compared to the isles overseas, where a course is around every corner. There are less than ten 18-hole courses on all of Cape Breton, but two of them are among North America's finest. One has been in existence for seven decades, while the other is enjoying it's first summer in operation.

Stanley Thompson's Highlands Links in Cape Breton Highlands National Park


Since 1941, golfers have made the journey from throughout the northeast to Cape Breton's northern shore to play one of North America's most coveted classic courses, Highlands Links. Commissioned by the National Parks Service in 1939, course architect Stanley Thompson was given a marvelous piece of national park land to craft a gem that has stood the test of time.

Highlands Links is not a 'true' links (in fact, Thompson originally named it the 'Mountains and Oceans Course'). But despite soft turf and holes that wind along a valley river and through dense trees, there are traditional links characteristics here: fairways are riddled with huge humps that yield few flat lies and greens have gentle, natural contours. The course also has an St. Andrews-esque, out-and-in routing. From the 10th green, you're six kilometers from the clubhouse.

Hole names come with an old world flair like 'Canny Slap' and 'Hame Noo.' The sixth is a personal favorite hole name: 'Muckemouth Meg' (even though the dogleg around a small lake swallowed up four of my golf balls). The seventh, 'Killiecrankie,' is one of the most demanding and gorgeous par 5s anywhere: a narrow, 570-yard roller coaster through trees to an elevated green. A brute of a hole with the finest 21st century golf clubs, it's a mystery how anyone with persimmons could have possibly reached this hole in three shots comfortably.

But Thompson's agenda when building the course didn't have much of 'easy' in it. Even the walk, for pre-golf cart era design, is quite challenging. The distance between the 12th green to 13th tee is a quarter mile, but it's the most pleasant walk between holes you could imagine: a narrow path under trees that winds along the Clyburn River. In total, a walk at Highlands Links is an 11kilometer trek, just as it was back when the course opened to vacationers coming from New England seven decades ago.

'Golf was an all day affair,' described Graham Hudson, manager of operations at Highlands Links. 'The golfers would take caddies and bring a picnic.'

Pure links golf comes to Canada at Cabot Links

A spectacular three-hour drive down the coastal Cabot Trail from Cape Breton Highlands, Cabot Links stakes claim as the only true links course between Bandon, Ore., and Ireland's west coast.

Ben Cowan-Dewar, a Canadian golf tour operator and entrepreneur based in Toronto, was tipped off about an abandoned coal mining site in Inverness from a state official during a dinner in 2004. Developing the coastal site into a course and hotel would become his first golf course project. He called on a reliable partner in Mike Keiser, the man behind the golf mecca that has become Bandon Dunes in Oregon, who assisted with the vision and the checkbook. With a 48-room hotel and 18 holes now open, a second 18-hole course, Cabot Cliffs, may break ground as early as next spring.

'This [development] is going to save the town,' said my caddie for the round, Neil MacEachern, a born-and-raised Inverness local who worked for the phone company 30-plus years before retiring to become a caddie at Cabot Links. 'You wouldn't have to pay me to do this job.'

In fact, the majority of the 140 jobs at Cabot Links have been filled by locals. The head housekeeper, for example, was hired largely because she had a reputation in town to keep an exceptionally clean house. The last coal mine closed in 1958, but residents are finding work on this land once again – and for plenty more than the $1.25 per day the miners earned.

It's likely a mere formality until Cabot Links becomes Cape Breton's second to join the Top 100 ranks (Highlands is rated No. 42 outside the United States by Golf Digest). The course, designed by Rod Whitman, presents a player-friendly but proper links test full of wispy grass, deep bunkers and shoreside breeze to be negotiated. Among the design traits are a massive, 30,000-square foot double green shared by the 13th and fourth holes, plus wall-to-wall fescue turf. Every hole has a view of the gulf, while at the south end of the course, No. 10 and 11 present scenic diversion beside a calm harbor. From there, Nos. 13-16 all play along one-mile-long stretch of gulf to the left, where the course and beach is separated by a public walking path, much like many links abroad. To the right, the town of Inverness's skyline is dominated by separate protestant and catholic church spires, helping to add more ageless charm to a links that's shining new.

More golf in Nova Scotia: Glen Arbour Golf Club

Getting to Cape Breton

The easiest way to get to Cape Breton, located just north of the mainland of Nova Scotia across the Port Hawkesbury Bridge, is to fly into Halifax International Airport (YHZ). Flights to most northeast cities like New York, Boston and Philidelphia are operated daily, as well as midwest cities like Detroit and Chicago. From Halifax, it's about a three-hour drive to Cabot Links and five hours to Cape Breton Highlands National Park.

Another option is to fly into Sydney (YQY) a small town located on the west side of Cape Breton that has connecting service from Toronto and Halifax. If you fly into Sydney, you can play another new course, The Lakes Golf Club, which opened in 2010. Designed by Graham Cooke, the course plays alongside a forested ski hill and overlooks scenic Bras d’Or Lakes.

For more information, visit

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Not DJ, not Poulter: Kisner most proud to take down Kuchar

By Rex HoggardMarch 24, 2018, 9:34 pm

AUSTIN, Texas – On his way to this week’s Final Four at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play, Kevin Kisner has beaten world No. 1 Dustin Johnson and the European match play ninja Ian Poulter. But neither match could compare to his duel with Matt Kuchar early Saturday.

“I was more jacked to beat [Kuchar], really. Kuch is such a good player and our games are so similar,” said Kisner, who defeated Kuchar in the round of 16, 1 up. “We both made eight birdies this morning and I barely snuck out of there. I thought it was a lot of fun.”

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By comparison, his quarterfinal bout against Poulter wasn’t nearly as electric. Kisner won two of the first four holes when the Englishman made bogey (No. 3) and when he was conceded the fourth hole, hecruised to an 8-and-6 victory for the week’s most lopsided win.

“I don't know Ian that well, so I don't really have a history with him, other than watching him kill us in the Ryder Cup,” Kisner laughed.

Things won’t get any easier for Kisner on Sunday when he’ll play Alex Noren in the semifinals. The Swede has been dominant this week and is considered one of Europe’s top players heading into this year’s Ryder Cup.

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Hahn: 'My fault for not expecting the worst from fans'

By Grill Room TeamMarch 24, 2018, 8:35 pm

Fan behavior has made headlines all year long on the PGA Tour, and the topic of conversation doesn't look like it’s going away anytime soon.

The latest example came on Friday at the WGC-Dell Technologies March Play, when James Hahn took to Twitter to complain that a fan deliberately yelled in his backswing on the 15th hole during his match with Jason Dufner, which he lost 3 and 2.

“Whether we like it or not, this is where the game is going,” he tweeted. “My fault for not expecting the worst from fans. Just sucks to lose a match that way.”

The two-time PGA Tour winner followed up his original tweet, clarifying that he can expect bad behavior from all golf fans while still loving and respecting them.

He also pointed out a major difference in comparing golf to other sports, saying some PGA Tour players go to far greater lengths than the typical NFL star to engage with fans on a daily basis.

The incident comes on the heels of several recent player run-ins with fans, including Justin Thomas at the Honda Classic, Rory McIlroy at the Arnold Palmer Invitational and Sergio Garcia earlier this week at Austin Country Club.

On Wednesday, PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan said that inappropriate fan behavior related to alcohol sales is something his staff is monitoring.

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Match-by-match: WGC-Dell Technologies, Elite Eight

By Golf Channel DigitalMarch 24, 2018, 8:25 pm

Here is how things played out in the Round of 16 on Saturday at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play. The week began with 64 players taking on Austin Country Club,but the field is dwindling. Click here for Day 3 match results:

Match 97: Bubba Watson (35) def. Brian Harman (18), 2 and 1. Watson was 1 down going to the eighth hole, but he won four of the next five holes to turn around this battle of lefties. A 12-foot putt for eagle at the 12th dropped, giving him a 3 up lead coming home. It was Watson’s second eagle of the day. He looks as if he’s still riding the confidence from that Genesis Open victory last month. Watson will advance to play Kiradech Aphibarnrat in the quarterfinals.

Match 98: Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28) def. Charles Howell III (59), 1 up. Aphibarnrat won in a late comeback, winning the final two holes. He holed a 9-foot putt for birdie at the 17th to square the match and won with an 8-foot birdie at the last. He had not led all day, not until that last birdie putt dropped. The 28-year-old Thai improved to 4-0 on this world stage after sweeping his group in the round-robin play. A four-time European Tour winner, Aphibarnrat is looking for his first PGA Tour victory. He will meet Bubba Watson in the quarterfinals.

Match 99: Kyle Stanley (45) def. Sergio Garcia (7), 3 and 1. Stanley birdied the eighth, ninth and 10th holes to go 3 up, and then he held off Garcia’s run at him, eliminating the world No. 10 with birdies at the 16th and 17th holes. With the victory, Stanley has a chance at a nice Texas two-step, a chance to eliminate the two highest ranked players left in the field, the only players left among the top 10 in the world ranking. But, there’s hard work to do in the quarterfinals, where Stanley will meet world No. 2 Justin Thomas.

Match 100: Justin Thomas (2) def. Si Woo Kim (50), 6 and 5. Thomas remains on fire in this format, steamrolling Kim a day after completing a round-robin sweep of his group by blowing away Francesco Molinari, 7 and 5. The Kim match felt like it was over shortly after it started, with Thomas making the turn 5 up. Thomas will advance to play Kyle Stanley in the quarterfinals.

Match 101: Cameron Smith (46) def. Tyrell Hatton (12), 2 and 1. Smith found himself behind early, falling 2 down after Hatton opened with back-to-back birdies, but Smith quickly rallied to win one of the best matches of the day. He birdied four of the next five holes to go 1 up. Hatton lost despite making seven birdies on the round. He lost despite making birdies at the 15th, 16th and 17th holes to the red-hot Smith, who made eight birdies. Smith will meet Alex Noren in the quarterfinals.

Match 102: Alex Noren (13) def. Patrick Reed (19), 5 and 3. In this Fire vs. Ice match, Ice won, with Noren making easy work of Reed. Really, though, Reed never got a flame going, and Noren wasn’t going to help him the way Jordan Spieth did a day before. Reed was 2-over on his card before finally making his first and only birdie of the day at the 13th. Somewhere, European Ryder Cup captain Thomas Bjorn must have been smiling, watching Noren easily take down the formidable American match-play dynamo. Noren will meet Cameron Smith in the quarterfinals.

Match 103: Ian Poulter (58) def. Louis Oosthuizen (25), 2 and 1. Poulter’s match-play mojo is going strong again, with the Englishman summoning the intensity that has made him so formidable in the Ryder Cup over the years. He was on fire Saturday, making eight birdies over the first 15 holes, if you count the concession he received hitting a wedge to 18 inches at the 13th hole. Poulter put a special putter in the bag this week, using the same flat stick that helped him lead the Euros to their historic comeback victory against the Americans at Medinah in 2012. Though Oosthuizen made four birdies in a six-hole stretch on the back nine, he still couldn’t make it close. Poulter will meet Kevin Kisner in the quarterfinals.

Match 104: Kevin Kisner (32) def. Matt Kuchar (16), 1 up. Kuchar applied all kinds of pressure on Kisner on the back nine, but he couldn’t get Kisner to fold in the best match of the day. Kuchar was 2 down with four to go but managed to pull all square going to the last. After missing a 15-footer for birdie at the 18th, Kuchar watched Kisner sink a 12-footer for his birdie to win. Kisner will meet Ian Poulter in the quarterfinals.

Match 105: Bubba Watson (35) def. Kiradech Aphibarnrat (28), 5 and 3. This was a tight match until Aphibarnrat’s short game failed him on the back nine, with a chunked chip at the 10th, a clumsy pitch at the 12th and a heavy heavy pitch at the 13th helping Watson win four consecutive holes. Watson played his way into the semifinals of this event for the second time in his career. He ended up fourth in 2011. Watson will meet the Justin Thomas in the semifinals.

Match 106: Justin Thomas (2) def. Kyle Stanley (45), 2 and 1. Thomas moved into position to win more than the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play Championship. He moved into position to take the world No. 1 ranking from Dustin Johnson. All that stands between Thomas and the top ranking now is Bubba Watson. If Thomas beats Watson in the semifinals, he is assured of going to No. 1. Thomas started slowly against Stanley, missing a 3-footer for par to lose the second hole. It marked the first time Thomas trailed in a match all week. All square making the turn, Thomas won the 10th, 11th and 12th holes and then held off Stanley the rest of the way. Thomas will meet Bubba Watson in the semifinals.

Match 107: Alex Noren (13) def. Cameron Smith (46), 4 and 2. With birdies at three of the first six holes, Noren took an early 3-up lead. Noren, however, made it more interesting than he would have liked the rest of the way. Noren lost the seventh hole with a three-putt bogey and lost the eighth failing to get up and down for par. Smith, though, never pressed Noren after getting that opening. He failed to make a birdie the entire round. Noren, who has won six European Tour events since the summer of 2015, has been knocking on the door to his first PGA Tour title this year. He lost the Farmers Insurance Open in a playoff in January and finished third at the Honda Classic last month. Noren will meet Kisner in the semifinals.

Match 108: Kevin Kisner (32) def. Ian Poulter (58), 8 and 6. Poulter gift wrapped Kisner an early 2-up lead, and Kisner pounced after that. Poulter, who was on such a torrid run until meeting Kisner, three-putted to lose the third hole with a bogey and then pulled his tee shot deep in a hazard to lose the fourth hole. Kisner birdied the fifth and sixth holes to race to a 4-up lead. Poulter had no answers. After making eight birdies in the morning Round of 16 , Poulter didn’t make a birdie against Kisner, who will face Noren in the semifinals.

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Garcia bounced in Austin: 'On to Augusta'

By Rex HoggardMarch 24, 2018, 6:55 pm

AUSTIN, Texas – For the 16th time in his career, Sergio Garcia’s week at the WGC-Dell Technologies Match Play ended earlier then he would have hoped, but this time he has plenty of distractions to ease the sting.

Garcia lost his Saturday morning match to Kyle Stanley, 3 and 1, marking the 15th time in his Match Play career he’s failed to advance to Sunday, but at least he has plenty to keep him busy with a newborn at home and his return to the Masters looming in two weeks.

“On to Augusta,” said Garcia, who is not playing next week’s Houston Open. “It's exciting. Obviously when we get there, it's going to be interesting to see how we feel and everything. But it is definitely exciting.”

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Garcia defeated Justin Rose in a playoff to win last year’s Masters, his first major triumph, so his return to Augusta National will be unlike anything he’s ever experienced.

His duties as defending champion will include hosting Tuesday’s Champions Dinner. No word on Garcia’s menu for the event, but various sources have confirmed it will be something “Spanish.”