Monday Scramble: Open season, on everybody

By Ryan Lavner, Will GrayJune 19, 2017, 5:05 pm

Brooks Koepka pounds Erin Hills into submission, the USGA gets one right (at last!), Johnny stands by his 63, Rory McIlroy owns Elk and more in this week's edition of the Monday Scramble:

Koepka was a fitting winner at a U.S. Open unlike any of the previous 116 editions.

Erin Hills featured the widest fairways in U.S. Open history, and they were made even more spacious with three days of light winds and heavy rain that took much of the fire out of a course designed to play firm and fast.

Coming into the week, the layout was thought to be a bomber’s paradise, and sure enough Koepka treated every tee as his own personal launching pad. He wailed away on driver, never hitting more than a 7-iron into a par 4 for the first three rounds, and became the first player to hit more than 80 percent of his fairways and greens. It was a clinical performance.

But above all, this major will be remembered for the bevy of low scores, including Koepka’s record-tying 16 under total.

No, this wasn't your father's U.S. Open, but rest assured the punishment will return next year.


1. It’s impossible to overstate how absurdly good Koepka’s ball-striking was last week.

For four days at a U.S. Open, he missed only seven fairways and 10 greens. 

Throw in a hot putter, and he became the first U.S. Open winner since 2003 to rank in the top 5 in both greens in regulation and putting.

2. Did watching Koepka overpower a golf course feel familiar? Because it should have. He’s basically DJ Lite.

Golf’s new bash brothers have become inseparable, living in the same area in South Florida, working with the same trainer, using the same swing coach, and even sharing the same chef while on the road.

Labeled for years as an underachiever, Johnson, 32, has become a mentor of sorts for Koepka, 27. The world No. 1 even called Koepka on the eve of the final round to remind his pal of a few keys – namely patience and process.

Pressed for details, Koepka laughed. “There’s probably not that much that’s interesting, to be honest. It was a long phone call for us – it was like two minutes.” 

3. Koepka became the seventh consecutive first-time major winner – the second-longest streak in the modern era – and it’s a troublesome trend as the sport’s popularity drifts back toward the norm in this post-Tiger era.

TV ratings for the final round were the second-lowest in tournament history.

Yes, these types of things are cyclical, but individual sports are most successful when there is a dominant figure. Even though major triumphs by Jason Day, Sergio Garcia and Koepka were satisfying for the hardcore fans, their breakthroughs merely reinforced that this is an era of competitive parity, at least in the game's biggest events. 

4. On Sunday afternoon, Brandt Snedeker was asked about his Ryder Cup partner’s ceiling as a player.

“I don’t see any reason why he can’t be a multiple major winner,” he said. “People don’t realize he’s got the total game: short game, putting, the way he hits it.”

He did issue a word of caution about his potential, however.

“One thing he is going to have to learn is when to rein it in,” Snedeker said. “But when he’s on like this, hitting driver the way he does, it doesn’t matter if you don’t pick your spots because he’s hitting sand wedge.” 



5. Brian Harman and Rickie Fowler offered an interesting contrast in perspective after falling short at Erin Hills.

Harman had every reason to look for silver linings after his tie for second – after all, he didn’t even have a top-25 in any of his previous major appearances.

Fowler, meanwhile, has the most major top-5s of any player without a win since 2010, and he should be growing tired of watching someone else hoist the hardware.

Or not.

Harman: “I don’t believe in moral victories. I had an opportunity today and I didn’t get it done.”

Fowler: “You have to measure success in different ways, not just winning, because that doesn’t happen a whole lot. … You kind of have to say, ‘Hey, it’s a major.’”

That's a revealing glimpse into each player's psyche, no?

6. There were plenty of red figures at Erin Hills, but the top players in the world found nothing but carnage.

Johnson, Rory McIlroy and Jason Day all missed the cut, marking the first time since the creation of the OWGR in 1986 that the top three players in the world missed the cut at the same major.

And frankly, it wasn’t really close. McIlroy and Day shot themselves out of it before the opening round was over, while DJ never got things on track after flying into town late after the birth of his second son.

Erin Hills' sprawling fairways and burly length would have seemed to favor each of them, and McIlroy’s “pack your bags” fescue analysis got plenty of pre-tournament attention. But ultimately a quirky venue got the best of all three, who likely will be happy to see the tournament shift back to more traditional venues for the next decade-plus.

Now, if the oh-fer happens again next month at Royal Birkdale ... 



7. That sound you hear is USGA chief executive Mike Davis taking a big sigh of relief.

Erin Hills may not have been a home run, but for the first time since Pinehurst, the folks in blue blazers left the 72nd green without any egg on their face.

After the greens at Chambers Bay and the rules fiasco at Oakmont, a little chirping about low scores and wide fairways must seem like an oasis in the desert. And while there were some double takes at Koepka's 16-under total, the course received largely favorable reviews from the field.

8. It was apparent, however, that the USGA went the cautious route with this major.

Designed for the usual 20-mph winds to rip through the treeless property, the 50-yard-wide fairways posed little challenge to those who had control of their tee shots.

Criticized in the past for pushing green speeds to the edge, the USGA kept the greens at Erin Hills at a manageable pace, helping eliminate some of the pre-tournament pace-of-play concern.

The course can be tipped out at 8,348 yards, and yet it might not have been all that outrageous to play the Open from the back boxes. The field averaged more than 302 yards off the tee, led by amateur Cameron Champ at 334 yards. In all, 14 players averaged more than 315 yards for the week as the course played nowhere near its sticker-shock yardage.

That the USGA and R&A – which recently concluded that the distance increase in golf has been negligible – can even consider an 8,000-yard major should be a red flag about where the game is headed. 



9. Johnny Miller is no longer on the call for the U.S. Open, but leave it to the NBC Sports analyst to offer the most polarizing opinion of the week.

GolfChannel.com asked for his thoughts after Justin Thomas’ 9-under 63 in the third round pushed aside Miller and set the record for the lowest score in relation to par at the U.S. Open.

Miller made it clear that he still views his 8-under 63 at Oakmont in the 1973 Open as one of the greatest rounds in the history of the sport, even if it’s no longer the benchmark at the Open. He criticized the wide fairways at Erin Hills and said the Open’s low scores made it feel like the “Milwaukee Open.”

“Nine under is incredible with U.S. Open pressure,” he said, “but it isn’t a U.S. Open course that I’m familiar with the way it was set up.”

Fans on social media seemed split by his comments. There were some who said that Miller was right, that his round came on a more difficult golf course in more difficult conditions and with more at stake. And others thought he was just a bitter loon who was typically ungracious.

10. Does Johnny have a point? Well, when judging the quality of these U.S. Open rounds, history likely will still favor Miller.

With his closing 63 in 1973, Miller gained 10.8 strokes on the field, and there were only seven rounds under par that day.

Thomas’ round was nine strokes better than the field average, on a day when 32 players broke par.

But Miller earned the decisive point in the argument with this: his 63 propelled him to victory, while Thomas' final-round 75 dropped him into a tie for ninth.

11. With nary a storm in sight during the opening round, the U.S. Open came and went without Phil Mickelson for the first time since 1993.

Mickelson didn’t receive the lengthy weather delay he needed to make the cross-country trek from his daughter’s graduation in California, a jaunt that always appeared to be a long-shot at best. Lefty took it down to the wire, sending his caddie to scout the course and waiting until hours before his tee time to withdraw, but ultimately his spot went to alternate Roberto Diaz.

Mickelson will turn 48 during the final round at Shinnecock, and we’re now reaching the point where a U.S. Open win for Lefty would be largely unprecedented in the history books.

12. The last major included a playoff between two Europeans, but this time around the Euros were almost absent.

England's Tommy Fleetwood took fourth-place honors, but he was the only Euro to crack the top 15 on a leaderboard coated with red, white and blue. Paul Casey, who held a share of the 36-hole lead, faded to 26th over the weekend while McIlroy, Justin Rose and Henrik Stenson all missed the cut.


Steve Elkington is usually wrong about most things on Twitter, but rarely is he so off-base as this.

After McIlroy missed the cut at Erin Hills, the Worst Tweeter in Golf suggested that the four-time major champion was “bored” playing golf and that he was content with his major haul and hefty bank account.

Ring the bell. 

Whoa! Landed a haymaker there. Elk is stumbling around the ring (as usual), but let's see how he responds ... 

OK, he's back, and he appears to have steadied himself long enough to fire off another illiterate tweet:

Second-round TKO. Elk remains winless on Twitter.

This week's award winners ... 


In Need of a Massage: Everyone who attended the Erin Hills Open. Fans who went all 18 walked roughly 30,000 steps – or the equivalent of 15 miles – on the sprawling, linksy property. Yowsers. 

Sorry ’Bout That: Jonathan Randolph. Tasked with keeping Thomas’ score during his historic third round, the Mississippi boy couldn’t fit the card into his back pocket and ended up ripping the bottom of it. “If that goes into the Hall of Fame and it’s all torn and jagged, they’re going to be wondering who in the world Jonathan Randolph is,” he said. 

NSFW: Adam Scott's putting. The former Masters champ had a few cringe-worthy misses from short range at Erin Hills, as his search for a post-anchoring solution continues.



PGA Tour-bound: Aaron Wise. The 2016 NCAA champion started 62-62 at the Web event in Wichita and boatraced the field, eventually winning by five to lock up his PGA Tour card for next season. He’s the next young stud who deserves our attention. 

Running Laps Around the Competition: Leona Maguire. The two-time NCAA Player of the Year won the Women’s British Amateur to continue her reign of terror. Fortunately for the rest of the amateurs, she only has one year left before she takes her game to the next level. 

Well Worth the Work: Local qualifiers. There were five players – Kevin Dougherty, Tyler Light, Jack Maguire, Jordan Niebrugge and Champ – who advanced through both stages of qualifying and made the cut at Erin Hills. It’s the fourth consecutive year that at least that many players have gone 3-for-3. 

Still On a Tear: Braden Thornberry. The NCAA champion and fourth-place finisher at St. Jude kept rolling at the prestigious Sunnehanna Amateur, which he won in a playoff. Can’t help but wonder how he would have fared at Erin Hills if he had qualified. 

If You’ve Got It, Flaunt It: Paul Casey. Yes, that is the Englishman’s wife, Pollyanna, who appears scantily clad not only on the back of his phone case, but also, apparently, on the inside of one of his suit jackets. 


Blown Fantasy Pick of the Week: Top 3 players in the world. Take your pick as to which player’s missed cut was the most disappointing – defending champion DJ, Rory on a rain-softened course, or Day and his excellent Open record. A terrible week for one-and-doners. Sigh. 

Getty Images

Furyk: Not worried about ' overconfidence, complacency'

By Rex HoggardSeptember 26, 2018, 12:44 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – After seeing the course for the first time this week on Tuesday, the U.S. Ryder Cup team convened for a dinner.

Although the team wasn’t giving away any secrets, according to captain Jim Furyk the goal was to allow players to share ideas on the course, potential pairings and to further solidify this week’s game plan.

“We sat down and had a great conversation with the players last night. The players spoke a lot,” Furyk said following his team’s morning practice. “There's not a worry on my end of any overconfidence, complacency. No one is putting the cart before the horse here.”


Ryder Cup: Articles, photos and videos


Specifically, vice captain Davis Love III said he reminded the team of a speech Michael Jordan gave at the 2012 matches.

“We started a little bit last night talking about the ultimate goal. Michael Jordan said if you think about the goal of winning the championship you’re not going to be able to play. You’re going to be too nervous,” Love said. “You break it down goal by goal.

The U.S. team only played nine holes on Wednesday at Le Golf National, the back nine, and will likely play the front nine during Thursday’s practice before the matches begin. Although Furyk has said the key to this week is getting the U.S. team to understand the course, he’s also aware of the need for rest following a grueling stretch of playoff golf for most of his squad.

Getty Images

Underdogs? Label doesn't concern Bjorn

By Will GraySeptember 26, 2018, 12:37 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – As the opening-day sessions draw near, European captain Thomas Bjorn is keeping his plans close to the vest. But he’s not getting bogged down in the notion that his squad might be the underdog this week at Le Golf National.

Jim Furyk’s American squad is one of the strongest on paper in Ryder Cup history, with only Phil Mickelson lower than 17th in the latest world rankings. It’s led Las Vegas oddsmakers to install the Americans as slight favorites in the biennial matches despite the fact that the Europeans haven’t lost at home since 1993.

Bjorn didn’t make any changes to his three practice foursomes one day to the next, lending some potential clarity to who will be paired with whom once the competition begins in earnest. And while he’s not shying away from the notion that his team might lack the firepower of the Americans, he’s not going to make it a significant focus in the team room, either.


Ryder Cup: Articles, photos and videos


“My job is to create a process for those 12 players to go out and perform their best. Are we underdogs? Probably on paper we are,” Bjorn said. “But we still believe that we can win. We still believe that we can go out and do a job on the golf course, and we concentrate on us.”

Bjorn remained coy when asked if he plans to ensure all 12 players see the course for at least one match Friday, although he reiterated that a plan is in place and “everyone knows where they are going.”

But with strength on both sides, Bjorn did open up about his expectation that this week’s matches could take an already historic competition to another level.

“These teams are the two best teams, world ranking-wise, that have been across from each other in this event,” Bjorn said. “It’s all lined up to be something special, so it’s for those 24 players to go out and show that.”

Getty Images

It's been a while: Happy 25th anniversary, America!

By Rex HoggardSeptember 26, 2018, 12:20 pm

SAINT-QUENTIN-EN-YVELINES, France – The last time the U.S. team won a Ryder Cup in Europe, Bryson DeChambeau was a week old, Jordan Spieth 2 months old, and Justin Thomas 5 months old.

Nearly a third of this week’s U.S. team was diapers when the Tom Watson-led Americans pulled off a 15-13 victory in 1993 at The Belfry.

Davis Love III, a two-time captain who is serving as an assistant this week, was playing in his first Ryder Cup in ’93 and secured the winning point, beating Costantino Rocca, 1 up, in his Sunday singles match.

Now 25 years removed from that victory, Love concedes it would have been unthinkable that 25 years later, the ’93 match would be the U.S. side’s last road victory.

“It’s surprising, 25 years,” Love sighed on Wednesday as the U.S. team went through its paces at Le Golf National.

It hasn’t been a complete bust for Team USA on the road since ’93; there have been close calls. The Americans dropped a one-point decision in 1997 in Spain and lost by the same margin in 2010 at Celtic Manor. But everything in between has been utterly forgettable. There was a three-point decision in 2002 at The Belfry and that nine-point boat race in 2006 in Ireland. Most recently, the Continent rolled 16 ½-11 ½ in 2014 in Scotland.

“It's not anything I need to mention in the team room. There's not like a big ‘25’ sitting in there anywhere. They are well aware of it, and they are well aware of how difficult it is to win in Europe. That's the battle we fight this week,” said U.S. captain Jim Furyk, who was playing Q-School in ’93 when Love and Co. were winning at The Belfry.

There is no shortage of reasons for America’s European failures, nor is there some sort of secret sauce for reversing U.S. fortunes.

“I'll praise both the European Tour and the way they choose golf courses, venues where they have European Tour events,” Furyk said. “We're coming into a golf course that they know a lot better than we do, that will be set up in a fashion that they think suits their game. Those are obstacles we have to overcome.”


Ryder Cup: Articles, photos and videos


Le Golf National annually hosts the French Open, and the setup this week has a distinctly European flare, with narrow fairways ringed by thick rough - mowed toward the tee box, no less - and relatively slower greens than what the Americans are used to on the PGA Tour.

Then there’s the crowd, a group that has proven itself formidable even when they travel to a U.S.. This week’s scene promises to be particularly intense from the outset, with the massive grandstand behind the first tee poised to hold more than 6,000 fans.

“They make a lot of noise,” Furyk said. “When we walk into that first tee, and they announce both teams, they are going to say, ‘And from the United States,’ announce two guys, and there's going to be a nice applause. And when they announce the two folks from Europe, there's going to be a giant roar and those players are going to feel that presence, and you're going to hear those roars around the golf course.”

And finally there will be pressure. We’re talking pressure the likes of which many have never experienced. Some would compare it to the intensity of being in contention during the final round at a major, but that really doesn’t do it justice.

The American contingent always wants to win for team and country, but this year’s matches bring in the added load of breaking a 25-year slide. The U.S. team will say the right things, dismiss the notion that somehow this Ryder Cup is more important than all others, but simmering under that calm exterior is the nagging truth.

“Phil [Mickelson] started in ’16 on the 18th green; he started talking about winning this Ryder Cup,” Love said. “We hadn’t even finished. He took someone off to the side of the green and said, ‘Look, in Paris it’s going to be a different ballgame. It’s an away game. We’re going to have to be on our game.’”

Ryder Cup captains always wear a variety of hats, but this week the U.S. leaders have taken on the role of arm-chair sports psychologists. It’s simple stuff really: Focus on your job and not the outcome; ignore the noise; win your point.

In an attempt to change his team room's mindset, Love is trying out a new narrative, that it’s been four years since a U.S. team Ryder Cup or Presidents Cup team has lost.

“They have to hear that. We have won three in a row. Don’t worry about the last 25 years,” Love said.

For three days, the U.S. team has been busy trying to learn as much as they can about Le Golf National. You know the deal, luck favors the prepared. This match and America’s 25-year losing streak, however, may depend on what they’re able to forget.

Getty Images

Tiger Tracker: 42nd Ryder Cup

By Tiger TrackerSeptember 26, 2018, 11:15 am

Fresh off his 80th PGA Tour victory at the Tour Championship, Tiger Woods is competing in his first Ryder Cup since 2012. We're tracking him.