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PGA Tour: No one allowed on property without negative COVID-19 test

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The PGA Tour is strengthening its protocols with stricter rules governing testing and who is allowed on the tournament property beginning at next week’s Rocket Mortgage Classic.

The Tour announced Saturday morning that players, caddies and other approved personnel will not be allowed on the tournament property without the Tour first clearing them with a negative COVID-19 test.

“Previously, players and caddies could be on site to practice as they awaited their arrival testing results, but without access to any indoor facilities,” the PGA Tour said in a statement outlining the change. “The Tour is taking that precaution one step further to add an additional safety measure in that no player nor caddie will be on site – anywhere – to start the week, without first being cleared through COVID-19 screening. Again, this same policy will apply to all individuals inside the bubble, such as independent Physios, instructors, staff and others.”

PGA Tour commissioner Jay Monahan appeared on Golf Channel Saturday morning to talk about the evolving protocols.



Updated COVID-19 protocols for Rocket Mortgage Classic

Updated COVID-19 protocols for Rocket Mortgage Classic


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“I think it’s just another example of a slight tweak, a slight tightening as we go forward,” Monahan said. “I’d expect us to continue to tweak more and more as we go.”

Earlier this week, PGA Tour officials announced that players would not only be tested before taking the Tour charter flight to an event, but they would also be tested upon arrival. Now, those arriving players, caddies and other approved personnel will not be allowed on tournament grounds until their results are confirmed as negative.

In other changes announced earlier this week, the PGA Tour added instructors to those requiring tests and moved the PGA Tour fitness trailer on to the property to keep players from having to visit local gyms to train.

“Our goal was to be best in class among professional sports leagues and to do everything we could to mitigate risks for our players, our caddies and our constituency, recognizing we would not be able to eliminate all risks,” Monahan said of the protocols as originally released. “What we’ve committed to do is be out here every single week, watch what’s happening, listen and learn and adapt.”