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Ogilvie bids farewell to PGA Tour at Wyndham

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Joe Ogilvie's lone PGA Tour victory came at the 2007 U.S. Bank Championship in Milwaukee. (Getty)

GREENSBORO, N.C. – About 300 fans gathered around the 18th green Sunday at Sedgefield Country Club to watch Joe Ogilvie bid farewell to the PGA Tour.

Ogilvie, 41, announced earlier this week that his appearance at the Wyndham Championship would be his 399th – and final – PGA Tour start. He plans to put the clubs away in favor of a full-time job in investment banking.

After closing with a bogey to complete his round of 3-over 73, the magnitude of concluding a professional golf career that started in 1996 began to sink in.

“Yeah, that was the last hole,” he said. “I held it together pretty well until the 18th green, and then I was like, ‘Man, that was hard.’”


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A graduate of nearby Duke University, Ogilvie had a hearty cheering section all week and has special ties to the Greensboro area. Sixteen years after a win at the Greensboro Open on the Web.com Tour – highlighted by a final-round albatross – helped him earn a PGA Tour card for the first time, Ogilvie was grateful to be able to finish his career near where it first took off.

“If you’re going to pick one, this would be a pretty good one to pick,” he said. “It’s kind of come full circle.”

Ogilvie admitted that it will take months, if not years, before he’s able to identify what he’ll miss most about life on Tour. He added, though, that while he may someday get the itch to return to competition, he doesn’t expect to return inside the ropes.

“This is it,” Ogilvie said. “I could get a couple sponsor exemptions here and there, but I’d be taking a spot from a guy that’s doing it full-time. When I change, and when I go and do the next thing, I’m going to go do the next thing.”