Report: Compton considering 'packing it in'

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Having lost his PGA Tour card for the first time since 2012, two-time heart transplant recipient Erik Compton is reportedly mulling retirement.

Compton was 61st in earnings through the first three events of the Web.com Tour Finals, and when the season finale was canceled because of Hurricane Matthew earlier this week, the 36-year-old lost his final opportunity to retain his playing status. According to a Golf Digest report, the lack of recent results has led Compton to ask himself some tough questions.

"I'm thinking about packing it in. I just can't get it done," Compton said after a T-24 finish at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship, where he entered the final round tied for sixth. "I've done this too many times. I can't get it done. If you can't get it done out here, you can't get it done on the tour. I'm a three-round player now."

Compton was a runner-up at the 2014 U.S. Open, the highlight of a career year that netted him nearly $1.8 million in earnings. But he barely hung on to his card last season, finishing 122nd in the FedEx Cup standings, and this season made only 10 cuts in 24 starts. After reaching No. 73 in the world with his breakthrough at Pinehurst, Compton is currently ranked No. 543.

The Miami resident took the cancellation of the Web.com Tour Championship in stride, offering a contemplative reflection to his nearly 32,000 Twitter followers:

Compton's best finish this season came at the season-opening Frys.com Open, where he tied for 26th. He missed the cut in his final four PGA Tour starts of the season and was disqualified from the John Deere Classic when he moved up on the pro-am tee sheet but wasn't yet on-site to play.

Compton turned pro in 2001 and received his second heart transplant at age 28. He continues to take several medications to keep his body from rejecting his third heart, and while he would be exempt on the Web.com Tour for the 2017 season, he seems to be at a crossroads.

"I'm not going to learn anything out here at my age," he said. "The only thing I'm going to learn is how to be away from the family with a short life span. I've been through the ringer enough, and I can't seem to find a way to get out of it."